order: carnivora

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The aardwolf (Proteles cristata) is a small mammal native to East and Southern Africa in the same family as the hyena. Unlike many of its relatives in the order Carnivora, the aardwolf does not hunt large animals. It eats insects, mainly termites – one aardwolf can eat about 250,000 termites during a single night, using its long, sticky tongue to capture them. It is nocturnal, resting in burrows during the day and emerging at night to seek food.

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A skinned wolf from yesterday and a crested gecko eye from today!
I just wanted to try drawing the shape of the skinned wolf head, I’m not sure why. I had an urge to draw it while watching the video of a wolf specimen being gutted from a video on @thebrainscoop . Maybe it’s because I don’t draw canines very often? Idk

Really Good Design Tropes That I Love:
  • Those little dot eyebrows. Like what rottweilers have kinda? Cute round eyebrows
  • Really thick, almost fluffy, colorful eyelashes
  • Horizontal pupils
  • Teeth characteristic of the order carnivora on (in?) something that is very much not
  • disproportionately long limbs, digitgrade legs
  • blank faces or faces that first appear to have only eyes
  • Barn owl heart faces
  • baboon mouths where the lips fold up over the face
  • Ghibli hair that floofs up like feathers or hackles
  • Hands with different colored fingers/fingertips
  • subtle colors and markings, pale spots and stripes and tones
  • frog-like hands/feet with noticeable finger/toe pads
  • mouths where they don’t belong
  • alternatively mouths that are exactly where they ought to be but are shaped weird, like cross-shaped or vertical or maybe there’s two of them somehow maybe there’s just one but it takes up most of the face
  • nested mouths holy shit
  • Those flabby black lips that bigger dogs have
  • thin, gangly bodies that contort almost like they don’t have bones
  • transparent skin, visible organs, bonus if the organs aren’t human-looking
  • Monochrome eyes, with rings of different shades
  • neck floof
  • Humanoid characters with one really exaggerated, nonhuman body-part
  • multiple eyes
  • eyes in mouths
  • tusks and fangs that curl outwards in really impractical looking ways
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Hesperocyon - The First Dog

When: Eocene to Oligocene (~39 - 33 Million years ago)

Where: North America

What: Hesperocyon is the oldest known and one of the most primitive members of the canids. It was a relatively small form, at 2ft 8 inches (~80cm) long on average, with slender limbs.  This ‘first dog’ is not the ancestor of all living canids, as it falls into a group of dogs that is now totally extinct; the Hesperocyoninae.  However, this small lithe form is thought to strongly resemble the true common ancestor of all canids. It was capable of climbing trees, but was more at home on the ground, and was showing more adaptations for the ability to run quickly on the ground than its non crown carnivoran ancestors. The ability to run fast for long distances is called cursoriality, and this is the primary locomotion type of most living canids. 

The world that Hesperocyon lived in was a changing world. The lush sub-tropical forests of western North America that characterized the early Eocene period were quickly disappearing, as the world became cooler and drier. The fossil record shows many groups of mammals becoming more adapted to open spaces, losing their arboreal adaptations as the trees disappeared and the great plains of the Oligocene spread.  Groups that did not adapt to this new more open world vanished, such as most North American primates, like Notharctus,and a group of very arboreally adapted stem carnivoramorphans, exemplified by VulpavusThe canid-line adapted very well to this new open world, with three distinct subgroups quickly popping up; the group that today’s fossil belongs to, the Hesperocyoninae, the Borophaginae (see Epicyon), and the Canidae; the group all modern species of dogs fall into. 

Reconstruction by Mauricio Antón

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The aardwolf (Proteles cristata) is a small, insectivorous mammal, native to East and Southern Africa.

The aardwolf is in the same family as the hyenas. Unlike many of its relatives in the order Carnivora, the aardwolf does not hunt large animals. It eats insects, mainly termites – one aardwolf can eat about 250,000 termites during a single night, using its long, sticky tongue to capture them.