or maybe borscht

Predictions for Of Bright Stars and Burning Hearts

Now since I’ve posted about what I am excited to see in the Rivals AU companion fic I’m going to post about my predictions.


Yurio idolized Yuuri as a child, like how Yuuri idolized Viktor.

Now Yurio has a bit of a broken idol thing going on because how Yuuri appears to treat Viktor. However, he can’t bring himself to completely believe that Yuuri is a bad person

Viktor talks to Yurio about Yuuri because Yurio is the only person receptive to “Yuuri is so amazing”

A few of Viktor’s prior relationships are mentioned but mostly glossed over.

Viktor gets a crush on Yuuri early on (maybe even by the JWC that Yuuri wins), however he doesn’t realize the depth of the feelings until later. (Falling Slowly is kind of a giveaway)

After Viktor realized he was in love he could not bring himself to sleep with anyone else, even though he thought that his love may be forever unrequited.

Their first time, before Yuuri said “I hate you, now fuck me,” Viktor was hopeful that Yuuri returned his feelings.

The first thing that kicked off the “Yuuri is a playboy” rep. is simply the gossip that follows most celebrities. However it got a big boost by Yuuri basically sneaking off all the time, that pole dancing incident, and an incident that Yuuri didn’t think was significant but everyone took the wrong way.

After the second time they had sex (when Yuuri was used Viktor in a horrible way to forget his loss) Viktor was the one looking at fanfiction… not a porn but at the fluffy “they’re so in love.” It didn’t help.

The Katsuki Yuuri hate really pisses Viktor off.

Viktor purposefully takes that picture with Yuuri’s jacket as a way to remember that night.

Viktor didn’t try to seduce Yuuri in chapter 11 because he was worried that either Yuuri would feel pressured or that Yuuri would leave.

After the blowjob in chap 11 he calls Chris and is all like “but the blowjob WHAT DID IT MEAN?!” and Chris is like “this is too much information even for me and that is saying a lot.”

The first time Viktor returns to his apartment after Yuuri leaves he can still smell the borscht and is sad, but happy that he has those memories. Or maybe there is leftover borscht and he eats it, remembering.

Viktor doesn’t bring up when Yuuri goes to the european championships because he is a mixture of hopeful (that Yuuri loves him back) and scared (that Yuuri doesn’t love him back)

Near the end Chris is like “…Yeah, Yuuri might actually have feelings for you.”

In chapter 14 before the happy ending Viktor looks at the pictures he took of Yuuri in Moscow to remember that fleeting happiness.

Yuuri goes to live with Viktor in St. Petersburg, (not sure what would happen with the coaching situation) but they get married in Hasetsu.

Okay that last one was pure wishful thinking; I just want to see Viktor in Hasetsu.

I can’t wait to read and find out. :)

Artemi “Blackhawks Magazine” Interview Transcription

I was asked to either post pictures of/transcribe the Artemi Panarin interview in Blackhawks Magazine; I opted to transcribe it so you can actually read it!  I was afraid the pictures would be unclear.


Artemi Panarin came to Chicago from far away and has made it in a big way.  The Russian rocket became an instant fit with the Blackhawks, endearing himself to fans and teammates.  Panarin is still learning to speak English, but here, through an interpreter, he conveys how advanced he is at life and hockey.


You are a star in Chicago after only a few months.  Based on what you’ve accomplished so far with the Blackhawks, are you a star back home?

I don’t feel that I am a star in Chicago.  I would like to be, but not yet.  There are a lot of stars with the Blackhawks.  I am an OK player.  I’ve been good at times.


All right.  Now that you’re an OK player in Chicago, do they follow you back in Russia?

I come from a very small town.  Korkino.  Friends and family followed me when I played in Russia for a few years, and yes, now they can maybe watch some of the Blackhawks games if they are on television.  They would have to get up early in the morning.  In Russia, a lot of people follow the Russian players who are over here.


Do you ever get homesick? 

I miss family and friends, of course.  My mother and father do not live together; they are separated.  I am very close to my grandfather and grandmother.  My grandfather taught me a lot about how to play.  He played once, not at the highest levels.  Maybe they will come to Chicago for the playoffs.  I basically left home when I was 10 to pursue hockey.  So I have been by myself for a while.  No problem.  Sometimes it is good to be alone.  Sometimes it is good to have solitude.  That gives me time to go over things, to think things over.  I live by myself, but I’ve met some good people, including of course my teammates.


Do you cook for yourself?

Oh, no.  Oatmeal in the morning for breakfast.  But for lunch or dinner, I usually go out to eat.


You certainly look like you’re happy in a completely new environment, whether you’re playing hockey or off the ice.

I try to have fun all day, every day.  Chicago is very nice.  Lots of nice people, lots of nice restaurants.  There is one not far from the United Center.  Red Square.  I can go there and pretty much order for myself, whatever I feel like.


What are your impressions of the Blackhawks and Chicago since you arrived last summer?

I came here with high expectations.  I heard so many good things about the city and the Blackhawks.  So I was expecting this to be a place where I would like to play hockey, and I have not been disappointed.


Let’s talk about that.  Stan Bowman, the vice president and general manager of the Blackhawks, says he and his staff began taking a long, hard look at you just over a year ago.  But so did a half-dozen other NHL teams.  Why did you pick the Blackhawks?

I heard about the way they play and saw some of how they play.  They play a nice style, the way I like to play.  Skate, play smart.  I like smart.  I like to play with the puck.  So do they.  Good hockey.  What I thought it would be like is what it is like now.


Bowman said a couple of his scouts, Mats Hallin and Ryan Stewart, were instrumental in the process, plus Barry Smith, the Blackhawks director of player development, who had coached in St. Petersburg before you played there.

Yes, we talked quite a bit.  They were very positive that the Blackhawks and Chichago would be right for me.


You certainly didn’t pick the Blackhawks because of money.  Bowman signed you to a two-year contract at the maximum entry-level salary ($925,000), which is all you could have gotten anywhere in the NHL.  He also said if you had stayed with St. Petersburg of the Kontinental Hockey League, you could be making three times that.

No, it was not about the money.  I thought it was time for me to see if I could make the NHL.


You were not drafted by any NHL team.  Was it because you were thought to be too small?

Too small?  I don’t know.  Maybe.  But here I am. (Smiling.)


According to Bowman, your contract included a clause that if you weren’t on the Blackhawks roster by December, you would be free to return to Russia.  There would be no minor leagues for you.

Yes, but I was confident that I could make it in the NHL.  I could have gone back to Russia if I didn’t make it, but I wasn’t really thinking about that.


Recently, you lost your frequent interpreter, Viktor Tikhonov, who was picked up on waivers by the Arizona Coyotes.

A good man.  He helped me a lot with the language and with getting used to being in Chicago.  He’s a good player, too.  I hope he does well with his new team.  Also, I have become friendly with a good family in Chicago, Andrew Aksyonov and his wife, Yulia.  They picked me up at the airport when I got here and I spend time with them.  We are good friends.


You’ve obviously hit it off with Patrick Kane, your linemate, on and off the ice.  You’re taking English lessons on Skype, but Patrick says he thinks you actually understand what he’s talking about a lot of times.

(Laughs.)  There are some sayings, some expressions, that I have picked up in the locker room, being around him and the other guys.  I don’t think I will say them all here.  But we do have a way of communicating.  Or maybe we’re just pretending that we understand each other when we really don’t.  (Laughs again.)


If you were to take Patrick for a classic Russian mean–if you haven’t done so already–what would it be?

Borscht.  Have to have borscht.  Maybe Russian ravioli.  Like dumplings.  Dough on the outside, meat inside.  Good.  I haven’t taken him for Russian dinner yet.  He took me to dinner not long ago.  Italian.  He paid.  I like the food in America.  But not fast food.  I don’t do fast food.


How about American beer?  Hockey players everywhere like beer, right?

Don’t like beer.  Ever.  Don’t drink at all during the season.  Summer, vodka.


What do you think of Patrick as a player?

One of the best in the NHL.  He is great to play with.  We kind of have a mutual understanding of what we’re supposed to be doing on the ice.  And my fellow Russian, Artem Anisimov, our center.  I can’t say anything negative about him either.  He does everything well.  He’s another great player.  So many great players on this team.


But you’re only OK?

I’m OK.


The KHL is generally regarded as the second-best league in hockey.  What’s the difference between the KHL and NHL?

There are a lot of good players in the KHL and good teams.  And there is good support.  When I played in St. Petersburg, the building was full.  But not full like Chicago.  And in the NHL, there are more good players, more good teams than anywhere.  KHL is good quality, but not like NHL.  The game here is faster.


Why do you think the fans in Chicago have taken to you so intensely?  They love you.

Maybe some of them do; I don’t know if they all love me.  But if I get excited, I show it.  Maybe some people like that.  Part of my job is to entertain.  We’re here to have run, right?  The atmosphere for hockey in Chicago, it’s exciting.  Loud.


What other Russian players do you admire?

Pavel Datsyuk, Evgeni Malkin, Alex Ovechkin and Ilya Kovalchuk, who I played with in the KHL.  Now I am friendly with Vladimir Tarasenko, who plays in St. Louis.


Head Coach Joe Quennville, apparently, was the one who nicknamed you “Breadman.”  Do you know why?

Because my name sounds like that restaurant: Panera Bread.  I haven’t eaten there yet.  I have gone there for tea.  Lately the coach is just calling me “Bread.”


How does Coach Q communicate with you?

When I came here, he told me, “Shoot the puck.”  When I don’t play well, I can see the look on his face.  He doesn’t say anything.


With the strong start you had this season, a lot of experts are already touting you as a possible winner of Rookie of the…

(Without interpreter) 24!


Wait a minute.  You just said that without an interpreter.  You understood where I was going with that question.

(With interpreter) I’m 24.  I played a few years in the KHL.  I don’t think of myself as a rookie.  It’s my first season in the NHL, but not my first season.


All the guys say you’re funny and have a great sense of humor.  How is this possible if only one other teammate, Anisimov, can understand Russian?

Me, funny?  Maybe it’s something they see in my face when I’m smiling or laughing.  I laugh at something I say, they think it’s funny, and then maybe they laugh, even though they really don’t know what I’m saying.


Above your locker, you have a religious icon that you often look to and touch.

I am religious.  Orthodox Christian.  My grandfather and grandmother, a lot of it came from them.


You mentioned enjoying solitude on occasion.  Do you think a lot about hockey when you are by yourself?

Sometimes.  If I have a good game, I don’t think too much about it.  If I have a bad game, I think about it.  I am hard on myself.  I am a critic of myself.  I am harder on myself than anybody else is.  Sometimes the mind goes too fast.  You have to clear it.  When things are not going well, like some of the guys told me earlier this year, it is good to just relax.  Sometimes you think you made a bad play.  Then you look at the film, it wasn’t that bad.


Girlfriend?

Nyet.  Single.


What would you rather do? Go to practice or sit down for an interview?

Practice.  Especially if the interview is a long one.  If the interview is too long, I don’t like that as much as a short one.


Is this interview running too long?

I would prefer going to practice.  This interview, it’s not so short anymore.  It’s going longer than practice.  (Laughs.)

Phoenix’s transformation into the person we see in Apollo’s time didn’t happen overnight - or at least, I don’t think so, anyway. He didn’t just fold the suit away some time after adopting Trucy and choose the least professional looking set of clothes from the back of his wardrobe, going ‘ah, yes, this works’.

That’s not how it works. How a progression of depression and stubborn will to keep going makes you not able to stop, but care less and less about anything other than the end goal works.

We can safely assume that he’s still wearing his suit, more or less, in the MASON system trial run. Perhaps it looks a bit more worn than most times - perhaps he’s simply had so much going on he hasn’t had it dry cleaned in those two weeks, or maybe he’s starting to realise that he needs to be more careful with money than ever, or maybe it’s a mix of both. But he’s still acting in investigation mode, and people still recognise him as Phoenix Wright, Attorney, and aren’t suddenly saying ‘why are you dressed like that’.

It starts off small. 

At first, he tries to keep the routine up - he wakes up, he washes, shaves, and dresses in something presentable enough.  He goes out looking for new clues, new evidence.

And when nothing comes up, he gets a bit demoralised, but it’s nothing he can’t handle.

His body language starts a subtle shift; when he goes to Trucy’s new school to pick her up, people recognise that blue suit, even if it is a bit more crumpled than they’d see it back when he was in the papers. Even if he isn’t bothering with a tie any more. His eyes shift away when he notices the stares, and when he knows Trucy isn’t looking, he hunches a little, making himself smaller. Unnoticeable. Unimportant. Nothing to see here.

He still hasn’t got the hardness in his eyes yet, and that won’t come for a while yet, it comes in spurts and stutters of a new understanding of how harsh the world is, and how easily the world can turn its back on you, and how much of a slog it is to work against the system and nothing is working.

He goes to the Borscht Bowl Club in response to an advert in the paper asking for a piano man in the suit, and when they see him (even with the creases and the crumples and the dark under his eyes from stress and lack of good sleep from making sure Trucy sleeps well, and wondering what they’re going to do about bills this time) their eyes light up, because they remember this man, this man who could play poker like the devil himself, bluffing like the best of them, and they suggest a proposal of sorts, not caring that he can’t even really play piano.

He’s uneasy about it at first. After all, it’s a little too close to the line on whether it could be considered ‘gambling’ or not, this idea of playing poker for the club, as long as he wins. For a while, he wonders if it’s the right thing to do, if he should go ahead with it, or call in, saying that he’s had second thoughts. 

He doesn’t immediately tell Maya or Edgeworth, worried about what they’d say, and when they do find out, they’re worried about him. But knowing that he has his suspicions that if he stays there, he might find more leads… they can’t tell him not to.

For the first couple of weeks, he plays bad piano and good poker in his blue suit, although the tie gets forgotten after a while. There’s a notable absence on his lapel that he keeps putting his hand to no matter how much he tries to break himself of the habit.

Then one day, the suit gets stained. Maybe it’s borscht. Perhaps it’s someone’s spilled drink. It could have been a compete accident - or, someone might have no love for him, and decided to play a prank, just to see his face as the last vestiges of his previous life gets dirtied, and he has to try washing it out in the bathroom, to no avail.

The suit is in the wash still the next day, still getting cleaned up, because he can’t not have the suit, just in case he needs it, so he has to find something else.

The first things he puts his hands on are a pair of sweatpants and a plain t-shirt.  The hoodie comes when he remembers how cold it gets down there.

He’s still wearing his shoes, though, and his face isn’t quite clean-shaven but it isn’t covered in stubble just yet. 

He’s halfway there, running down the street and not looking quite one thing nor the other. 

He finds it funny how he feels like he fits in more with the crowd he’s mingling with now that he’s not able to look like a lawyer at all any more, and that night he realises that he’s started to cry, without even realising it, because he’s lost something, and doesn’t quite know how he’d managed that when he’d thought he’d already lost it all.

He damages his shoes by stepping on broken glass one day, and narrowly missing the sharp shard slicing his foot. He sighs, and knows that it’d cost far too much to repair or replace them, and he isn’t going to ask for help on this - it’s his problem. Besides which, why bother with new shoes when he’s got a pair of old sandals that’ll do just as well that’re hanging around in his room somewhere?

With the sandals comes even more change to body language - posture that used to be more upright starts to become more slouched, and there’s a new shuffle to his walk that wasn’t there before, that starts because he’s not used to wearing sandals all the time, but never truly goes away.

He’ll shamelessly ask any of his friends or relatives for financial help when it comes to Trucy, because she’s the light of his life, she’s his kid, she deserves the best, deserves everything he can’t give her, but when it comes to his own welfare, his own clothes and ability to look after himself, he leaves everyone tearing their hair out, frustrated at how his answer is always that he’s doing just fine, there’s no need to worry, as long as Trucy’s okay, then he’s okay, and shouldn’t that be enough?

Trucy makes him his hat as a personal project, because she has her magician’s top hat, and that keeps her head warm, but her Daddy doesn’t have anything like that, and she gets worried that in the cold weather and the freezing temperatures of the club, he’s going to catch cold again - like he already has, several times; winter is the worst, because there’s no warm weather to thaw out into when you get upstairs and outside, it’s just cold all the time, and it’s left him under the weather more than once. 

It doesn’t help that the heating gets cut off more than once, either, and he still has to go to the club to play piano and poker, has no choice but to win through whatever means he can, be it using Trucy or other methods, because he has to provide for her and make sure they’re both earning something at least.

After a while - months, perhaps, years, maybe - he stops looking at the suit, stops wondering when he might next need it, stops fingering the spot on the lapel where his attorney’s badge used to be, because he knows that each time he’s done so, it’s just made the loss hurt more than ever. Especially with how long it’s been, and who knows how long it’s still going to be. 

He stops looking at his old cases, and his old photo albums, unless it’s for Trucy, or Maya, or Edgeworth, because for them, he’ll do anything, but if they aren’t around or the subject of the past isn’t being brought up, then he pretends as though this is normal, that this is the way things are, and that it’s alright.

And the more he tells himself that things are okay like this, for now at least, the more he starts to believe it.

So by the time the ghosts of the past reappear, and Shadi Smith offers him a challenge… he likely wouldn’t think of himself as having changed that much. 

After all, it’s just a natural progression of events, right?

Bread Army

Artemi Panarin

Blackhawks Magazine

Artemi Panarin came to Chicago from far away and has made it in a big way. The Russian rocket became an instant fit with the Blackhawks, endearing himself to fans and teammates. Panarin is still learning to speak English, but here, through an interpreter, he conveys how advanced he is at life and hockey.

You are a star in Chicago after only a few months. Based on what you’ve accomplished so far with the Blackhawks, are you a star back home?

I don’t feel that I am a star in Chicago. I would like to be, but not yet. There are a lot of stars with the Blackhawks. I am an OK player. I’ve been good at times.

All right. Now that you’re an OK player in Chicago, do they follow you back in Russia?

I come from a very small town. Korkino. Friends and family followed me when I played in Russia for a few years, and yes, now they can maybe watch some of the Blackhawks fames if they are on a television. They would have to get up early in the morning. In Russia, a lot of people who are over here.

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anonymous asked:

"Pink paths look so unnatural, that's not the way Animal Crossing towns are meant to be." Yes, this pink talking octopus roaming through the pines on her way to have a cup of coffee should really be guided only by a tasteful row of clovers, or perhaps a few stepping stones. Pausing to pluck a weed, she wonders what she will cook for dinner later. Perhaps pesto pizza, or a nice borscht. Maybe that nice purple kangaroo will join her. Nature is amazing.