oprahs book club

The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction—until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature.” The Latin root simply means “letters.” Those letters are either delivered—they connect with an audience—or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books—and thus what they count as literature—really tells you more about them than it does about the book.
—  Brent Weeks
The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.
—  Brent Weeks

James Franco’s Summer Book Club

Summer is here, so I thought I would offer a few books that have been on my list. All of these books have left their stamps on my memory. There was the summer I read Moby-Dick, and the summer I read Moby-Dick again… I hope to pass on some books that might make a few marks on your own souls.

See the reading list

NEXT CHAPTER
Even in retirement, Oprah still recommends solid reads and most
recently, “Home” topped the list of the 18 books to look out for in
May. In the spring lead-up to flighty beach reads, the latest from
Nobel Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison is a heavy story of
redemption and one veteran’s experiences after the Korean War. Tonight
Symphony Space hosts its own Thalia Book Club, which takes an in-depth
look at books that people are talking about—dare we say, Oprah Book
Club-style? This evening’s showcase features author Russell Banks
(“The Sweet Hereafter” and “Affliction”) interviewing Morrison on this
intriguing chapter of 20th-century history.

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Oprah’s Book Club 2.0)

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 by Ayana Mathis

A debut of extraordinary distinction: Ayana Mathis tells the story of the children of the Great Migration through the trials of one unforgettable family.

In 1923, fifteen-year-old Hattie Shepherd flees Georgia and settles in Philadelphia, hoping for a chance at a better life. Instead, she marries a man who will bring her nothing but disappointment and watches helplessly as her firstborn twins succumb to an illness a few pennies could have prevented.  Hattie gives birth to nine more children whom she raises with grit and mettle and not an ounce of the tenderness they crave.  She vows to prepare them for the calamitous difficulty they are sure to face in their later lives, to meet a world that will not love them, a world that will not be kind. Captured here in twelve luminous narrative threads, their lives tell the story of a mother’s monumental courage and the journey of a nation. 

Beautiful and devastating, Ayana Mathis’s The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is wondrous from first to last—glorious, harrowing, unexpectedly uplifting, and blazing with life. An emotionally transfixing page-turner, a searing portrait of striving in the face of insurmountable adversity, an indelible encounter with the resilience of the human spirit and the driving force of the American dream.

“Wild”. Finished this delicious book this morning. Thoroughly enjoyed every last bit of it. You’re reading first hand of the long,painful,emotional, but inspiring journey of Cheryl Strayed. She opts to do a solo hike, but, not just any run of the mill solo hike. The Pacific Crest Trail, which starts in Mexico and goes all the way up to Canada. She starts in the Mojave Desert and stops 11,000 something miles later in Oregon. Along the way, you learn some fun historical facts as well, of the trail and what not too. If you’re at all interested in hiking, personal growth, and finding your independence, it’s highly recommended. Plus its in Oprahs Book club… who the fuck doesn’t want to read a book that is OPRAHS BOOK CLUB.