online-resources

anonymous asked:

i want to keep on making art but i'm so depressed and it's taking my whole energy like... i cAN'T DO ANYTHING but i have so many ideas and i just can't sit down and express them as i would like to. any advice? :-//

💔 hi im sorry that youre struggling right now and its preventing you from creating im not sure if i can proper advise you on how to healthily deal with your depression but i’ll link some online resources for depression/self care that i hope eases what youre going through or just be helpful, sending you love& support and i hope you start making art again.

http://desperadore.tumblr.com/post/157171453048/alternative-depression-tips-for-when-you-read-the

http://likesummerrainn.tumblr.com/post/106967595928/let-itbebabygirl-opulentes-abuse

http://itwillbealrightdude.tumblr.com/post/119237006655/coping-skills

http://callistomist.tumblr.com/post/118505959727/i-decided-to-create-a-masterpost-that-would-help

anonymous asked:

I need to re-paint an A-7E Corsair II Navy aircraft for our VFW post. Where can I get a template?

are we talking standard grey/white, or aggressor camo? there are many many online resources for an aspiring modeler!  

for example, this is a marking guide from a decal set. you can find many other references by using a quick google search. is there a specific plane you are modeling?

anonymous asked:

I know you're fielding a ton of "how do I become game" questions, I have some that are very specific. I code for work in C#, PHP and web stuff. I know my way around C++ but I'm not prepared enough to start applying for game gigs. My questions are: 1. Is there a good self service way to indicate what my current skill level is, comparatively against current industry standards? What is "ready"? 2. The best resources and ways to expand my C++/programming knowledge in a constructive way

I always appreciate specific questions. It’s a lot easier to give more specific and useful answers than hand-waving generalizations that are read and forgotten.

1. Is there a good self service way to check my current skill level?

Yes. I suggest trying programming challenge websites like [topcoder.com], [codility.com] and [codewars.com]. Make sure that you’re using C++ as the language of choice. Many of these sites also have lessons geared towards teaching you the concepts you’ll need to know. Do as many challenges as you can, and try to improve in the ways the automated code checkers suggest. There’s a large variety of tasks at each site that you can try tackling, with varying levels of difficulty. I suggest starting with the fundamentals as a refresher and working your way up.

2. Best resources and ways to expand your C++/Programming knowledge

In addition to practicing with coding challenges, I would suggest picking up [Unreal Engine] (which primarily runs with C++ instead of Unity’s C#) and using it to put together smaller projects with a clear set of requirements that you can accomplish. Once you have a clear goal within a scope you’re sure you can reach, you can actually do the tasks and make sure that you can complete them. Once you’ve gotten the correctness part down, you can try submitting your solutions to sites like [Stack Exchange’s code review section] and asking for feedback on the stuff you’ve written.

Remember, the general rules of completing a code task are:

  1. Make it work (It should do what you want)
  2. Make it right (It should handle edge cases gracefully)
  3. Make it fast (It should do what you want quickly)
  4. Make it pretty (Other engineers should not have any trouble understanding your code if you hand it off to them)

Start small and work your way up to bigger tasks as you go.


Got a burning question you want answered?

albalmundo  asked:

Hey! So I found this page about cognitive disfunction and basically what it does is that it has a program in it that makes other people experience how our brain works so they can understand it better. it's designed for parents of children in grades pre-k through 12, but it can be a fun thing to do to everyone that says our adhd problems aren't true! the page is this one: understood(point) org /en/tools/through-your-childs-eyes/ hope it helps! <3

https://www.understood.org/en/tools/through-your-childs-eyes

this is a masterpost on how to deal with all of your schoolwork during a shitty mental health week. it is important to note that mental illness is a finnicky animal, and that not everyone has the same experiences as far as symptoms and adverse affects are concerned. however, these are all tips/resources that have worked well for me in the past, and i hope that there are at least a few that will work for you as well.

i. look at your schedule for the next day. rally all of your energy do all of the assignments and readings that absolutely must be done by tomorrow. disregard everything else. it can be done another day.

some portion of the stress will be lifted off your shoulders, and you will be able to relax a little bit and focus on things that are more important. If it can be delayed by 24 hours, it is not worth doing the night you are on the verge of a real crisis. i’m not advertising procrastination, but the reality is that we all do it. and i would argue that sometimes it is justified. if you are having a bad enough night where it takes all of your emotional and physical energy just to get through 30 pages of reading, you need to put nonessential things aside for a time when you are feeling more mentally available. your work will be higher quality if you do it this way.

ii. take a shower.

showers (especially hot ones) will help clear your mind, open your sinuses, and relax your muscles. stand/sit under the spray until you feel less tense. even if you’ll be heading straight back to your room to work, you will be more relaxed and levelheaded to tackle the assignments in front of you.

iii. tackle your essential assignments in smaller chunks.

slow down your routine by a few minutes. study in 10-15 minute bursts instead of your usual 20-30. study in your room instead of the library. make a small change that could help boost your focus. however your study schedule may look, slowing everything down can help you accomplish your essential tasks without causing you to burn out before everything is done. it may seem impossible to slow down your already fast paced schedule, but trust me, even making small adjustments can do a lot of positive work.

iv. seek help and support from outside sources if you need it.

study with a group of friends or classmates if you are feeling up to it. this will help with your comprehension of the material, and might help boost your motivation to get through those essential assignments so you can go back to your room and wind down. call your family if that will help you feel better about where you are. if necessary, seek counseling/wellness services on your campus. this information is often posted somewhere on your university’s website. remember that there is absolutely no shame in seeking out therapy and counseling related services! there are also many online resources for mental health you can access as well, if in person counseling is not a viable option for you.

v. remember that you are not a bad student because this is happening. you are not a failure. this is not your fault.

mental illness sucks. it sucks all of your energy and motivation right out of your system. it is brutal. sometimes you will need to take a night off. let yourself do this without punishment. your mental health is important. repeat this mantra to yourself until you believe it. above all, remember that your feelings and struggles will always be valid. keep fighting, i believe in you!

compilation of apps & websites

hey, guys! i’m back again, with another masterpost (!!!) it’s my fifth one this month bc its one of my new year’s resolutions to make a masterpost for each week of the month! hopefully this helps u guys!!!

some tips //

  • using an extension/app/website to block distracting sites is a lifesaver
  • i use the blocksite extension on chrome
  • u can also use forest to block ur sites + time ur studying
  • pomodoro is one of my personal favorites bc it’s 25 minutes of work (which is a pretty short time, so u can concentrate better) + 5 minutes of a break (to refresh urself!!!)
  • remember not to get too caught up in these, bc too many sites + apps are just a waste of time, and u’ll end up studying even less
  • everything in moderation!!!

resources //

wow, that was a long post, and now my eyes hurt from staring at the screen. but hopefully this is useful to someone!!! also, shoutout to @studyquill bc her tags and navigation is so organized and easy to use; when i was researching for other studyblr masterposts on apps and websites, i ended up reblogging a bunch from her tag!!! hugs, mel.

peachykeen-piggy-prattles  asked:

ok, here's a question that's been with me for years now: so uh, what exactly is the history of the tfwiki? why is it comedic in nature? im not complaining, its just that the tfwiki is so different from all other fandom wikis that i'm curious how it got that way. did it start as a regular wiki before someone added a funny caption as a joke, and it just went from there? or was it always going to be comedic? who created it? why? forgive me if this has been asked before, but google is useless here.

“Teletraan I, the Transformers Wiki” was originally founded on Wikia (then called “Wikicities”) back in May 2005 by a user named Nova81426, with the intention that he and a friend of his would work on it as a hobby. The week after opening up the site, however, the pair were offered a big job opportunity (to take over the running of a comic book store), so their planned project had to be shelved so they could devote their time to that.

Nothing much happened to the wiki for a while, until April of 2006, when it was discovered by longtime Transformers fan David “@itswalky“ Willis. The editing of Transformers articles on Wikipedia itself had been increasingly troubled for some time thanks to the efforts of one particularly terrible editor, so Willis determined to turn “Teletraan I” into the “proper” Transformers wiki as a way to have a good online resource free of that nonsense. He chose to make it a little humorous, and the first few editors who joined him in working on the site - being from a similar era of fandom as him, and sharing a similar sense of humor from being in the same fandom circle - rolled with it.

And y’know, it might’ve ended there, with the site being somewhere these guys had fun while documenting Transformers, but instead it just kept growing and growing as more people joined up to contribute. And as popular as we are for our tone now, back in the early days, whee-OOOH, there were some folk that HATED it, and were really out to get the site! But as our main talkpage still says, “THE FUNNY STAYS,” and eventually history got on our side. :)

To complete this recap of our history and answer the other big question that’s often asked - “why are there two wikis?” - we’ll jump ahead to 2008, when Wikia was in the process of redesigning itself to look less like Wikipedia, leading to the incorporation of an increasingly ridiculous number of ads. You’ve seen what Wikia (or “Fandom,” as they’re call now) looks like these days, right? This was the move toward that. The Transformers Wiki had no time for the talking auto-play adverts that were being shoved into their page layouts, forcing text and images off the screen, and as the Wikia administrators were not willing to compromise on the issue, it was decided that, in order to preserve itself, the site would go independent, moving to its own server, owned by Willis. That was when we were rechristened “TFWiki,” and where we remain today, while the previous Wikia wiki still exists in a largely-abandoned state.

physics doesn’t have to suck: how to enjoy and do well in your required physics classes

As someone who doesn’t intend to take a physics class ever again, I was relieved when I walked out of my second semester physics final. That said, physics doesn’t have to suck or drag your average down. 

(1) How to enjoy physics: Adjust your attitude. Physics is so cool if you actually think about it. Your attitude will dictate your experience. (2) But physics is so hard: Change the way you study and don’t give up. I did better in university physics than in high school. The content was way more difficult but it was my studying methods that made the difference.

This post is split into 3 parts: Introductory physics (very basic physics, that unit of physics you had to do in a lower level science class), high school physics (physics from an algebra-based perspective), and university physics (calculus-based physics and labs). (Obviously these overlap a lot but I needed to organize this somehow)

INFO IS UNDER THE CUT B/C THIS POST IS RIDICULOUSLY LONG

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

I don't know how to study. All through high school I never needed to and now I'm at Uni, I don't know how. I'm so stressed and so behind. Please help

Hey babe! I’ve been in your exact position before, and I know how overwhelming it feels. Building study skills basically from scratch is a lot of work, I won’t lie, but it’s totally doable! There are a few different things you’ll need to do;

1. Get a planner. Preferably a cute one that you want mind keeping on your dresser all the time. Put every single due date, reading date, class activity, everything in it. Then, go one step further and put start dates in too – at least three days before the assignment is due if it’s simple homework, longer for bigger projects. Always give yourself more time than you need. Be sure to look at your planner first thing every morning, and stick to what it says! Discipline is key. 

2. Find out your learning style. A little bit of research online can help you figure it out and give you some helpful resources to use this to your advantage. After you’ve figured this out, you can come up with a plan to effectively study for each subject. 

3. Don’t get burnt out. Studying for long periods of time without breaks is a sure fire way to not remember a thing. Give yourself plenty of breaks, and make time for friends and other things you enjoy. 

4. Learn to ask for help when you need it. This is one that I still need to get better at; I’m always afraid of inconveniencing people, but the truth is your teachers and classmates are happy to help if you need it! Go to office hours, start a study group, take advantage of on-campus tutoring if it’s available.

5. Use online resources if you need clarification. There’s so much information right at your finger tips, so take advantage of it! If you’re confused about anything, big or small, chances are someone else out there has been, too. Do a a quick search for articles or videos that may explain things more clearly than your textbook or teacher does. I’m a big fan of Khan Academy!

6. Study like you eat. I heard somewhere that you wouldn’t just eat one huge meal and hope it lasted all week, so you shouldn’t study that way either. Studying in shorter, more regular intervals will help the information stick better than just cramming right before a test.

7. Relax! You can totally handle this, it’ll just take a little time to adjust. Remember to take plenty of time to take care of yourself, both mentally and physically. Get plenty of sleep, eat as healthy as you can, and drink plenty of water. Feeling your best means you can perform your best, so make self care a priority!

Best of luck at university!

Here on the studyblr community everyone seems to have neat and organised notes, not the ones written in that hurried and messy handwriting that pretty much all of us take in a daily basis. I decided to write this short guide with the intention of giving tips on how you can have a neat notebook, so when you finally seat down to study and revise, you will have clean and easy to understand notes looking back at you. They do not have to be pretty or aesthetically pleasing in any way, just neat. That is enough to reduce a lot of stress while reading through your notebook before an exam!

Now, this is what I do and works the best for me. It might not be the right method for everyone because it requires a bit of patience and extra time. Even so, I have been doing this for quite a while now and it is what I like the most. I hope it can help you!

1. Buy an additional notebook

Instead of writing directly into your notebook, owning another one for the sole purpose of note taking is the first step. I have only one notebook for all subject and once it ends, I buy a new one. Simple as that. 

As you can see, my handwriting here is ugly (heh, at least for me), hurried and for some people probably barely legible. It looks that way because I was writing what the teacher was saying and writing on the board at that time, so I had to quickly write down everything otherwise I would miss pieces of information. 

At the beginning of each class I write its name and the date, then proceed to take notes under them so later on I will know when the notes were taken.

2. Rewriting notes

The next step is rewriting the notes you have taken on your actual notebook. That is when I do those fancy titles, use coloured pens and write calmly so my handwriting will be legible. 

However, I do not only rewrite them but I also check the textbooks and other online resources to make larger summaries and explanations, to complete them. So, rewriting your notes is also a method of studying in more detail and revising. It has helped me a lot with subjects such as History and Physics!

Here is the outcome! This is a very small example though, my notes are usually much longer, but you can get the idea. Reading something which is written neatly is much better, I bet you can all agree, so that is why I always go through all of this. 

Again, I hope this can be helpful to some of you! Good luck on your exams! :)

anonymous asked:

Hello, I'm the anon who's freaking out about being thrown into adulthood, and thank you for your previous help. 1.) How do I mamage/budget a minimum wage salary? 2.) I've never been great with any sort of organization, but would you mind teaching me about home organization and important paper organization?

Okay, so this post will be about budgeting on minimum wage, and later in the day I will also post about paper organization. Enjoy!

Budgeting on Minimum Wage

Overview

The average minimum wage in the US is $7.25/hr. Even working full time at 40 hours a week, that’s only a profit of $290 before taxes. This is not a fair living wage! You are worth way more than this amount! I strongly encourage you to start looking for another job that pays better, look for something around the $10-$15 range. 

While $7.25 is atrocious, thousands of people around the world support families on much less. If they can do it while supporting children, so can you! To live off a minimum wage budget you need to declare yourself independent. If your parents are still claiming you as a dependent YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO DO THIS. I also recommend that you have the highest amount possible taken out of your taxes so that you get money back from your state at the end of the year, instead of being in debt to them.

What I’ve done is come up with a budgeting plan based off some made up factors and my own personal experience.

Housing

1. City life. Forget about the city! Apartments located in cities can be three times as expensive as apartments in small towns or villages. On top of the extra expense, they’re much smaller and have less amenities included. I’d much rather live in a one bedroom apartment with a dishwasher and a conveniently located Laundromat, than a literal closet with no windows on a fifth floor walkup. Look for apartments twenty minutes to a half hour outside of your closest city. Now you have the close conveniences of a city, with none of those pesky city prices that your budget can’t handle.

2. College towns. Shop around and look at apartments by local colleges. Large colleges with have apartment complexes within walking distance of the school grounds. Landlords know that college students have less money (you might even be a college student yourself) and adjust their prices accordingly. Even apartments next to ivy league schools are priced this way, so don’t be discouraged by the institution’s “prestige”.

3. Locale. Your safety is more important than your bank account. It doesn’t matter if you live in Section 8 housing or in an affluent suburb. Some apartment complexes and neighborhoods are just safer than others. I live in a heavily populated and upper middle class suburb, and the first year I moved in, a drunk woman tried to throw a beer bottle at my car. Thankfully this is the only time this happened to me, but it made me feel unsafe in my environment. Before signing a lease, walk or drive around your prospective home’s neighborhood at night. Take in the atmosphere, and make sure it’s one where you could comfortably run to the local supermarket at 10:30pm and pick up toilet paper.

4. Roommates. Living on minimum wage requires that you find one or two roommates to help split the rent. The more the better! Get together with your more responsible friends, so at least you’re living with people whose company you enjoy. There are lots of “roommate wanted” forums and message boards for you to browse on the internet, but always bring a responsible adult with you before meeting a stranger. Please. Bring your mom if you have too.

Food

1. Low-spoon food. I created this post a few months ago which offers lots of suggestions about cooking and shopping on a budget.

2. Online recipes. Here are some of my favorite online Tumblr cookbook resources. 

3. I also regularly update my cooking on a budget tag. 

Misc Expenses

1. Gas. Shop around and find the cheapest gas in your area. Avoid gas stations next to colleges, highways, and in touristy areas. Look into getting as gas rewards card from your favorite supermarket. I get 10 cents off a gallon with Stop & Shop every time I do a big shop. 

2. Dollar store. Get to know your local dollar and bargain stores. You can buy everything from pots and pans to bed sheets there. These stores often sell bulk ramen for $1 and large cans of crushed tomatoes for 75 cents. That’s enough food for you to live off of for several days. When shopping, I make three grocery store stops to ensure that I spend the least amount possible on my pantry needs. I go Dollar Store, Stop and Shop, and then to my local organic grocery store. I’m going to make a list of things that I buy at Dollar Stores and things that I don’t buy at Dollar Stores soon!

3. Cable. We are living in the digital age- you don’t need cable television. Use Netflix or Hulu or whatever. It will save you tons of $$. 

4. Internet. As far as internet speed goes, if you’re living with roommates you will probably need a higher speed. Living by yourself, choose a lower one. Most internet companies offer large discounts to new subscribers. These typically only last a year, but will save you serious money. Make sure to take note of when this discount expires, and contact the company before it does. If you don’t, they’ll begin charging you the full amount without notice.

5. Verizon. I just want to take a moment to talk about how much I love Verizon because they have literally saved me so much money in the three years I’ve been with them. After you sign a contract with a new internet company, they charge you a bunch of ridiculous fees like “activation fees” and “installation fees”. I called Verizon and was like “I’m a poor college student, I can’t afford this” and they were like “don’t worry, we’ll waive the fee”. I signed a two year contract with them that saved me $80 on a high-speed internet bill per month (my price being only 50.99 a month). After the contract expired I call them and they put me on a month to month, keeping the price absolutely the same. TLDR- get Verizon if you can.

6. Utility. Get on a monthly budget with whatever utility company services your new apartment. Although it may seem like the cheaper option, paying the actual amount of electricity you spend per month is the more expensive. It’s also unpredictable, and a minimum wage budget won’t allow for it. See this for more info.

7. Amazon. I buy a lot of my beauty, cleaning, and cat products online. Amazon offers Prime shipping free for a year with a student email address, and then offers it at a greatly reduced price after the year. If you are a student, snap up that free deal ASAP. If it’s in your budget, I’d greatly recommend investing in Amazon Prime.

8. Saving money. It’s so important to attempt to break way from the “paycheck to paycheck” vicious cycle. Living this way does not allow for emergency expense money, and trust me, sometime soon you will need emergency expense money. Your cat might get sick or your car may die, whatever it is, it’s always smart to have at least $500 squirreled away. I’m gonna level with you, things have been tight for my budget and I haven’t been able to save anything for the past three months. But this month I will!

Example Budgets

Full Time

Working with the $7.25/hr and 40hr/week model, here’s an example budget for living on minimum wage. That’s $1,160 a month without taxes.

Housing: Let’s say you’re sharing an apartment with two close friends, the rent being $1,500 without any amenities. That rent split three ways is $500 each.

Gas I commute twenty minutes every day, and I drop about $20-$25 a week on gas. That’s $100 on gas a month.

Food: I do one big shopping a month with my boyfriend. We drop around $180 and that’s including toiletries and soap and stuff. So maybe you’ll spend about $100 a month on all your shopping needs.

Cable/internet:  Hopefully you took my advice and skipped cable. Let’s say you’re paying around $50 per month for internet. Split three ways that’s $17 each.

Laundry: Hopefully you’re not like me and are only spending around $20 on laundry per month.

Random expenses: Because there always are some. Let’s just tack on another $100.

With everything added up, you still have around $290 left before taxes! That money can go into a savings account, and after several months, you’ll have that $500 worth of emergency money saved.

Part Time

Working with the $7.25/hr and 25hr/week model, here’s an example budget for living on minimum wage. That’s $725 without taxes.

Housing: In this case, you need to look for apartments in the $800-900 range. In my area, one bedroom apartments go for around $1000, so you may need to get creative with your roommate (I don’t think you could have more than one roommate in this situation). Buy dividers to split the bedroom or studio in half! Let’s say your rent is $850 with nothing included, that’s $425 each.

Gas You’re still looking at a large gas bill per month, so it may be more inexpensive to ride a bike or use public transportation. Let’s say you use public transportation, and spend around $50 a month on that. Or maybe you and your roommate can split gas expenses and share a car?

Food: Pinch those pennies! Use some of those budget cookbooks I linked above to help you cook healthy and delicious meals for under $4 each. See if you can only spend $80 a month on groceries.

Cable/internet:  Hopefully you took my advice and skipped cable. Let’s say you’re paying around $50 per month for internet. Split two ways is $25 each.

Laundry: Hopefully you’re not like me and are only spending around $20 on laundry per month.

Random expenses: Because there always are some. Let’s just tack on another $100.

That leaves you $25 to put in your bank account, if that. This is a paycheck to paycheck situation, and you will probably need to get another source of income to feel secure. But you can still do it!

For those of you considering picking up a hobby, here is my personal experience with various crafty hobbies I’ve tried and their assorted costs:

Drawing ink/pencil: highly variable $-$$$. To start out with it can be quite cheap, if you’re just starting with school supplies and notebook paper. I’ve found even the higher-end paper products aren’t nearly the biggest drain, however, as when you start using the specifically artistic pens and pencils. I’d recommend sticking with basic supplies while you’re still developing your drawing skills, including using sharpies when you’re doing sketches (although these are getting a bit more expensive, too, they last quite a while even with heavy use). I also got a lot of use out of the 6-pack of varying sized Micron pens. For pencils, wooden is much preferred over mechanical, and if you can’t afford a full pack, I’ve personally gotten by fairly well just with 2B and 6B. As for colored pencils, quite honestly I’ve seen little difference in quality between expensive and cheap beyond color-choice. For charcoal, the charcoal pencils have struck me as something of a gimmick–you can do about as well just with a stick. Also, don’t neglect white charcoal; it really makes a difference and gives you a lot more options with your drawings. This is a pretty approachable craft to learn, however, even if you’re broke to begin with.

Drawing digital: highly variable $-$$$. Tablets aren’t nearly as expensive as they used to be, and there are a lot of free programs online. My experience here has been limited by my own funds, but I will say this is still an accessible hobby. For the most part, because my digital equipment is lower-end (also just due to talent), I’ve found it most useful for touching up my hand-drawn artwork after the fact by cleaning up the digital image, fixing mistakes I didn’t notice before, etc. It’s also a medium in its own right, but you’d have to get better advice elsewhere on what products would really be worth it.

Sewing: high cost $$$. Sewing machines themselves are a costly investment and pretty necessary if you’re actually making a garment, but even hand-sewing racks up, quickly. Thread, pins, and needles are fairly low-cost, but the fabric is getting ever more expensive. A proper pair of scissors can also be a bit costly; kitchen scissors are all right and will get the job done, but you will weary of their ineffectiveness. I also recommend a seam-ripper. I’ve gotten by without any of those special measuring mats or rotary cutters, but each project has its unique costs (snaps, buttons, zippers, batting, etc.). This craft is also a bit difficult to learn by yourself. Youtube tutorials can go a ways, but it’s really better to learn from someone else. If you have access to a sewing machine and a teacher already, this is a pretty useful skill to learn if you can take the time.

Oil painting: moderate to high cost $$-$$$. The costs can be fairly low if you stick with acrylics, but I don’t think much of that medium outside when you’re initially learning how to paint at all. Oil paints are pretty expensive, and you’ll need several base colors–I wouldn’t recommend trying to mix any yourself just from basic red, yellow, blue. When I started out it was in a class, and we were given 2 shades of red, 2 shades of blue, a green, 2 shades of yellow, a brown, and a violet, and even with this, getting just the right shade for the subject was a little tricky (although admittedly this was a beginner’s course). Brushes are also something you’ll want to invest in, and you’ll need several sizes. Turpentine is needed to clean the brushes, and you’ll want Gesso to prime your canvases, too. You’ll also need a flat palette, and then a razor to clean your palette. If at all possible, I recommend taking a class to learn how to do a proper oil painting and care for your equipment, and get some of your initial supplies from there.

Crocheting: low to moderate cost $-$$. I never got into knitting, but I imagine it’s much the same cost-wise. You basically only need yarn and a hook for this. Hooks come in plastic, and you can make a single size work for several weights of yarn in a pinch. The yarn is where the variability comes in. Simple acrylics won’t feel nearly as nice, but they do come pretty cheap. It’s also a very forgiving craft that you can undo and try again, over and over, so you don’t waste much. There’s plenty of online tutorials and forums, too, to help you get started.

Cross-stitch/embroidery: low cost $. Floss is fairly cheap, you can get a very wide selection of colors, and it goes quite a long way. Aida cloth is also fairly inexpensive, particularly given how long a project can take. You don’t need a frame, but they do help, and they run pretty cheap if you just get a plastic one. In terms of learning how, it’s very easy to pick up. There are also free online resources to make your own patterns. If you start adding beads and such the costs may stack up, but for the most part this is a pretty inexpensive craft.

Perler beads: moderate cost $$. You wouldn’t think plastic melting beads would cost much, but you’d be wrong. The color assortments are such that you rarely have enough to complete a project unless you buy each color you need individually, and even then you’ll want to stock up on black. Pegboards aren’t too expensive, but you’ll likely need a few even for a fairly small project. You’ll also need an iron (if you don’t have one already), masking tape, tweezers, and a needle. This is a project you can learn alone with little guidance once you learn the basics, but keeping up with the hobby will mean buying a lot of those beads, which gets expensive before very long.

Witchy 101-Research and practice

As we all know, Witchcraft has a lot of branching paths, things to learn and stuff to try. But we can’t possibly learn everything, not all at once. It is important to take things with a pinch of salt, and apply our own learning experiences to really begin understanding Witchcraft.

-Choose the topics you like; what do you want to work with, learn to do. They are the ones you focus on

-See how you can break topics down into chunks; divide it up into sections and focus on a section at a time until you understand it, then progress to more advanced sections once you feel comfortable. Don’t rush though!

-Mix theory with practice; you’re best to practice as you go as so to see how you feel doing it. This also gives you some flexibility into changes you make to methods and approaches, so it’s comfortable for you. Use everything as a guide, but make sure you make it personal.

-Everyone’s different, so don’t feel like you need to copy someone else to be good enough; if you like your way, then don’t change it.


Ways that you can record and research;

-Books; the staple of Witchcraft. Not everyone’s going to know what books are good or bad, but that’s how you learn. Look up book recommendations, ask around, or just grab a book and try it. If it involves plants, follow safety precautions and be careful with handling, otherwise use information from Witchcraft books as a guide. 

-Collecting items; if you work with physical objects like plants, crystals, candles, etc. Collecting is very useful as part of learning. Experiment and see what you can do with them, because you might discover ways no one else could. 

-Notebooks; pretty self explanatory, and these can be drafted neat into a grimoire if you have one

-Flashdrives; again, self explanatory but these make excellent portable grimoires for the discreet witch

-Photographs; If you are into plants, taking photos of anything you come across is very handy, and they can be stuck into your grimoire or stored on a flashdrive. Remember to name and label them with parts that you can use and always cross reference anything you find with reliable sources

-Field trips; visit as many places as you can, including your local area. Get to know what’s available to you. There’s always a good place for magic outside, but just be safe!

-Online resources; Google is great for answering quick questions, or getting definitions for words. Tumblr as we know is rich in resources created by other Witches. Also be sure to look at Websites, cross reference anything you’re unsure of though!

-The Witchcraft community; there are thousand of us, and we all know something useful and unique, so if you need assistance and opinions, asking us is a great way of learning something that a book never could teach you.

-Mobile apps; there are apps suited to different interests, like tarot references, moon phases, even plant encyclopedias. Explore those and try them out!

movinggaribov  asked:

Hi! Do you have any suggestions for good Russian podcasts? Thank you!

Hi! Yes, sure: 

ОЧЕНЬ по-РУССКИ

Russian Made Easy

One Minute Russian

Everyday Russian

Learn Russian|RussianPod101

Learn Russian Step by Step

And my humble Five Minutes podcast for advanced learners: 

Russian Grammar does great job collecting and updating information about the Russian resources. I highly recommend to follow this blog.

yopizzaislife-blog  asked:

I've learned some HTML and CSS on CodeAcademy, but now I have no idea what to do. I wanna do programming, scripting or coding. What do you suggest I start out with and where to learn it online?

Hi there!

I would exhaust the free online resources as much as you can. Read web development/design magazines and blogs. Download tech podcasts. Try to immerse yourself as much as possible. Nothing you learn will be superfluous; it all helps to build up your vocabulary, which will make learning in the future exponentially faster.

First, try out Ruby. Ruby on Rails is a fairly hot full-stack framework. You’ll be able to do cool stuff like build your own Twitter or Blog or Reddit in a super short amount of time.

This short tutorial lets you try out Ruby for free: http://tryruby.org/

And Codecademy has a free course —

Learn Ruby: http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/ruby

Another really great resource is the Flatiron School’s open source Pre-Work for their Web Dev/iOS immersives. Essentially, they ask students to complete all of this pre-work before beginning their 12-week courses. Much of it is free, but a few subjects require a Treehouse or Code School account. These are pretty inexpensive services, less than a programming book. I highly recommend them, especially Treehouse.

You can see the Pre-Work here: http://prework.flatironschool.com/

If you want to try Treehouse, this link will get you 50% off your first month.

The Pre-Work is divided into Web Development or iOS Development tracks, so pick the one that interests you most, or do both!

I’d recommend learning some JavaScript since it’s essential to know if you want to be a web developer. I’d also recommend building a few sites and playing around with jQuery plugins to learn through trial and error.

I think Learning By Doing is the best way to learn, so the online resources that let you actually build things along with the instructor are SO much better than a dry programming book. Leave the dry books for when you need to delve into a topic on a deeper level. Not for starting out.

Some Fun Stuff to Read / Listen to:

Smashing Magazine: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/

Net Magazine: http://www.creativebloq.com/net-magazine

This Tweek in Tech (TWiT) - http://twit.tv/twit

Lifehacker - http://lifehacker.com/tag/podcast

Gweek - http://boingboing.net/tag/gweek

anonymous asked:

you've mentioned you can code in your comics, where did you learn? I've always been interested butnever knew where I could go to pick it up. well besides college but I can't afford that :(

I’m primarily self-taught, actually! Although I did go to college, it wasn’t for programming or web development. (Like…at all.)

I started with books you can find in the coding reference section of the bookstore, but that was before there were so many resources online to help. ;) (And those books are expensive!) Of course, knowing what you want to code will help you know which language and where to start. (Not sure? This infographic is super helpful!) I still love having code books around for reference though (I’m a nerd, yes) and there are some recent fantastic ones if you need recommendations.

But here are some resources to try out:

  • Code Academy (free)
  • SoloLearn (free - app)
  • Team Treehouse (paid subscription but totally worth it & less than college)
  • Lynda.com (paid subscription – if you want to learn things beyond programming, they’re a good all-around resource of video tutorials in a huge library of subjects)
  • TutsPlus (free tutorials and how-tos)
  • SitePoint (excellent professional resources from developers for developers – mix of free and paid content)
  • Interneting is Hard (free; CSS/HTML only)
  • Stack Overflow (the place to go when you need a pro’s help to debug your work!)

And these are only a few. Like, the first things that come to mind. And don’t forget blogs! There a TON of blog resources out there – SmashingMagazine is definitely my #1, and for web development, you had better be reading it.

Honestly: if I could learn code at 11 with nothing but geocities, a book way about my reading level, a terrible neon-colored website in comic sans, and lots of repeated trial and error…so can you. And there are way more resources available to you now, and only a few clicks away! (Seriously. Google it. GOOGLE IT.) You can pretty much find open-source software for code editors, compilers, version control, and anything else you could need.

Seriously.

You can get started learning today, and you can do it for free. Don’t get me wrong. It does take time and practice. But it’s best to learn by doing – so just start doing!

Dear people reading this, 

This is not one of my usual letters. I’ve lately been getting some concerned (and sometimes angry) messages of people who dislike my use of the words “kids” and “Mommy” and I’d like to address these concerns and explain why i use them. 

The idea for this blog came to me during the holidays. I was thinking about how many lgbt+ kids feel lonely during Christmas because they’re surrounded by unsupportive relatives and wished a nice mom would just send each of them a uplifting letter. The thought got stuck in my brain and after a few weeks, i finally told myself, “Why sit around and think a nice mom should do that? I can be that nice mom who does it!”. I figured a blog would be ideal to publish those letters, so any kid or teen who likes them can read them. Then, i found myself wondering why i should limit it to a letter for the holidays. Why not publish letters year round as a long-term source of support? And so, “letters-to-lgbt-kids” was born.  

While the blog grew, i noticed that not only kids but people of different age groups seemed to find comfort in my words, so i broadened the range of topics but i always strive to keep the blog safe for 12-year-olds (the age minimum according to tumblr’s guidelines). 

It has never been my intent to belittle or insult lgbt+ adults by calling them my kids. I certainly would never go up to a lgbt+ stranger in public and say “Aww, you’re my cute little gay child.” As an lgbt+ adult myself, i fully agree that doing so would be demeaning and downright creepy. I also never meant the message of my letters to be “lgbt+ people are all silly cute little kids who should not get taken seriously” and i’m fully aware that there are lgbt+ people - kids and adults alike - who will find my letters ridiculous and prefer less “cute” online resources. 

I’d like to apologize to anyone who felt uncomfortable reading my letters or felt insulted by my choice of words. They were meant as a cute way to bring some positivity and support to lgbt+ youth and it honestly breaks my heart to feel like they caused pain instead. 

With all my love, 

The person behind “Tumblr Mommy” 

kathorakiryu  asked:

Do you have any advice for someone one who new to DMing? (Or links)

WELL where to begin, the DM nust fill many roles and i’m not just talking about NPCs

The GOD (inventor) a DM is the creator of a world nay a multiverse of worlds and so must create a rich variety of countries, cultures, cities, people, lives, tombs, monsters and stories. 

The storyteller: A DM must create a narrative for their players and be artistic, set the scene describe the surroundings, the people, the atmosphere, really bring the world to life for the players

The entertainer: a DM must keep his players interested and invested in the story and characrers and a good way to do that is humor. Good humor in a group is essential, and every now and then an adventure needs a little humor.

The adjuticator: A DM must be a font of knowledge of rules and stats (there are official books like the core rulebook, starter kit and beastiary as well as countless online fourms and resources) and often there can be disagreements over rules and among players, whatever the case, the DM is the final word in all things

The guide: a DM is an advisor and a guide to the players at and away from the table. They advise plyers in their choices of character creation and offer the occasional hint in the adventure but ultimatly a player’s choices and mistakes are their own

The facilitator: players will have characters, characters have dreams, riches, glory, badassery, and as a DM you should help them achieve those dreams but again, DM is the final word because sometimes a half dragon demigod scorceror weilding a flaming katana is a little over the top

The enemy: A DM is every enemy the players will face, every danger, and so you can’t go too easy on them, make a challenge, make a nemesis!

The friend: a DM is a friend to all players, you must help players when they need it, you need to keep players in good spirits and keep the adventure fun with great adventures and interesting NPC’s

I hope all of this helps

Now go forth young master and Good luck

tips for choosing a college

This is a really exciting time for high school seniors/transfer students who are getting accepted to universities! But now it’s time for the most stressful part: deciding which school to go to. I was in the exact same place last year that you are in right now and I thought I would share some tips for making this difficult (but exciting!) decision.

Research, research, research. Online resources are the best. On the school’s official website, look at their course catalogs and major requirement sheets. If you’re coming in undeclared, look at their list of majors and see if you think they have enough options you’re interested in exploring. 

Also think about what it will be like to be a student at that school. Don’t only focus on the practical stuff like rankings and academics.  Look at the student orgs, events, and student resources. Follow their social media accounts (especially Instagram and Snapchat) to get a sense of the school’s vibe. You can even creep a lil and look at current students’ posts to see the campus through their eyes. Search for YouTube videos as well. There might be some vloggers who go to the school you’re interested in and you can see the day in the life of a student.

Take tours! Attend any admitted student days or come to campus for a regular tour. This is soooo important. You will get to learn about the school from an actual student and they will tell you more than you could ever find online. At the very least, walk around the campus yourself a little bit to get a feel for it. If for whatever reason you can’t go to campus before you have to choose, contact the admissions office and ask for some extra info. They might even put you in contact with a student who is in your major who you can talk to.  

Once you have narrowed it down to a couple schools, ask people which one they think you should go to. I did this and realized that whenever they told me a different school than UCSB (which I ended up going to) I would feel disappointed. I would always be like, “But why not UCSB?” You could also do the same thing by pulling names out of a hat. Think that whichever one you pick out, you will go to and see how you feel about it. While choosing a school should definitely be about academic opportunities and other practical factors such as financial aid, I think your gut feeling should play a role as well.

Do not worry about what other people will think. Everyone has an idea of what certain schools are like. It might have to do with rankings or other reputations that the school might have, but try to disregard that as much as possible and form your own opinions. Don’t worry if people don’t think the school is good enough or anything like that. After all, you are the one who will be going there for years, not them. 

Think about distance! I definitely underestimated how important this was for me. Consider how often you plan on going home. If you’re going to go home every weekend, a local school will probably work best in the long run. If you’re the total opposite and plan on rarely going home, a school much farther away will probably work out well for you. 

Talk to current students if you can. Reach out to alumni from your high school or community college who currently go there. If you do stop at the school for a visit, feel free to stop some students for directions then ask how they like going to school there. Check if there are any studyblrs who go to the schools you were admitted to (me if you were admitted to UCSB) and ask them any questions you have. 

So those are all the tips I can think of right now. Enjoy this time in your life because it is so exciting and you have so many options. If you have any questions about college or UCSB feel free to send me an ask! Good luck, and congratulations!