online multiplayers

I’d say I’m sorry for the net neutrality spam, but I’m not. This NEEDS TO BE HEARD.

If you aren’t sure what points to bring up when calling/emailing, here are a few:

- Online shopping makes up a huge percentage of all shopping done, especially around the holidays. If people don’t have access to internet, they won’t shop online, and that means a huge loss in profit for a lot of companies.

- More expensive internet means less people use it. The internet only really became a huge thing about 20-25 years ago. I know for a fact a large amount of people are going to get rid of their internet completely so they don’t have to waste money.

- Less people using the internet also means a heck of a lot less revenue for websites like Facebook, twitter, tumblr, etc. Most people will likely switch to texting/calling each other like we used to before the internet was huge.

- Less internet users means less online gaming which means companies like blizzard that focus on multiplayer online games are going to suffer BAD.

- No one is gonna wanna vote for or support the campaign of someone that voted against net neutrality.

- If they’re doing this to stop piracy/online terror groups/whatever else, remind them that those things existed before the internet. People can still pirate movies, music and games without online sharing, terror and hate groups will still find ways to organize, it’ll just be a lot less traceable.

- If any ISPs pop up that don’t throttle their customers internet, they’ll become the preferred company.

Remember, these people talk money, not logic. Speak their language and prove to them how much we need the internet.

I’ve gotten quite a few asks recently wanting to know what my issue with Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition is. You’ve probably seen my grumbling about edition-warring a time or three, so I want to clarify that that isn’t where this post is going. I think 5E has a lot of fantastic ideas, and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to new players. The problem I have with it isn’t that I don’t like what it’s doing; it’s that I see a lot of great game design ideas lumbered by a conscious refusal to take them to their logical conclusion - or, in other words, it’s not that I think 5E goes too far, it’s that I think it doesn’t go far enough.

(Fair warning: a lot of this is going to be really jargon-heavy game design stuff that normal people probably don’t care about. That’s your cue to check out if tabletop RPG meta isn’t your cup of tea!)

To start off, there’s a concept in game design - applicable to both video games and tabletop games - called “mechanical engagement”. Basically, it’s what it sounds like: how and when the player is called upon to make rules-based decisions. Some games have high mechanical engagement, in the sense that players are given lots of rules-based “toys” to play with and expected to interact with them frequently; other games have low mechanical engagement, meaning that there are fewer rules-based “toys”, and fewer player-facing decisions about how to deploy them.

Moreover, in games that have roles or classes, different roles within the same game can offer different levels of mechanical engagement. It’s tempting to think of this in terms of low mechanical engagement = basic and low-powered, high mechanical engagement = advanced and high-powered, but this ain’t necessarily the case; you can see this phenomenon in action in the sphere of video games in, say, 2D fighters, or multiplayer online shooters. You have characters/roles with complicated and demanding execution, and characters/roles with simple and straightforward execution, and the former aren’t necessarily more powerful in practice, in spite of being more demanding to play.

The reason this happens is because a player’s preferred level of mechanical engagement is totally independent of any other axis of play (e.g., preferred role, preferred aesthetics, etc.) Some players like having lots of rules-based knobs and levers to play with, and they’ll gravitate to roles that will give them that even if there’s no actual benefit - i.e., even if it obliges them to work harder just to get to the same level as players in roles with lower mechanical engagement. Similarly, some players just want to press buttons and watch stuff explode - they prefer low mechanical engagement.

There’s nothing wrong with either preference, and one of the major perks of playing a tabletop RPG with class/role-based character creation is that it allows you to accommodate different preferences in terms of mechanical engagement within the same party. You can have players who want to juggle lists of special abilities as long as their arm, and players who just want to hit things with swords, and they can play at the same table - everybody wins. Again, remember that this is totally separate from wanting to play a “low powered” or “high powered” character; the level of mechanical engagement that a role demands is a different axis from how big its numbers are.

Now, one of the perennial issues of fantasy tabletop RPGs in general and D&D in particular is tying particular levels of mechanical engagement to particular role aesthetics. In many iterations of the game, if you want to play a role with high mechanical engagement, you have to chuck fireballs, and if you want to play a role with low mechanical engagement, you have to be a sword-slinging meat shield. A player who wants high mechanical engagement but also likes swords is liable to be told, both by the game’s text and by other players, that she’s Doing It Wrong - and so, for that matter, is a player who wants low mechanical engagement, but also wants to set stuff on fire with her brain.

(Incidentally, this is one of several areas where core-book 4E solves a real and recognised problem in the most hilariously unsubtle manner imaginable, by bashing every role into exactly the same level of mechanical engagement. Which is fantastic if that just happens to be your preferred keel, because now you can play and enjoy every role - and terrible if your ideal toybox is too much larger or smaller, because now every role is an equally bad fit for you.)

5E brings a couple of great ideas for solving this problem to the table:

1. It introduces a series of “tutorial levels”, where each class‘s abilities are introduced gradually over the levels 1-3, reducing entry barriers, leveling out the learning curve, and allowing folks to “try on” different levels of mechanical engagement more easily; and

2. It introduces system of templated archetypes whereby particular classes/roles can be “tuned” to different levels of mechanical engagement, making the same basic set of roles accessible to players with a broader range of preferences in terms of mechanical engagement - and, critically, the choice of template doesn’t have to be made until after the previously mentioned “tutorial levels” are complete.

Sounds great, right?

The problem is, it only applies to fighters and rogues and related classes. Clerics and wizards - i.e., the full-featured spellcasters - don’t get any “tutorial levels”, are obliged to choose their archetypes at first level, and all of their archetypes are about equally complicated - to the point that, for example, the lowest mechanical engagement cleric you can build has more rules-based toys you’re obliged to wrangle at any given level than the highest mechanical engagement fighter.

In other words, the game turns around and goes some distance out of its way to reinforce the very problem that this design pattern is meant to solve!

This pattern is repeated in several other places. For example, one of the long-standing disagreements among the fandom is whether D&D should primarily support epic, globe-trotting “high fantasy” or gritty, street-level “low fantasy” as its default tone. It’s as much a question of rules as it is of flavour text, so it’s hard to do both - but 5E gives it the old college try, which is a frankly fascinating decision. How does that play out?

Unconventionally, 5E does it based on character classes: you literally have some classes that are built out of high fantasy tropes, and some classes that are built out of low fantasy tropes, with the result that you can have characters who basically hail from totally different genres of fantasy fiction running around in the same party. This isn’t necessarily a bad idea; there are lots of inspirational sources that setup could describe - I mean, just look at The Lord of the Rings. If that’s not a prototypical case of high fantasy characters and low fantasy characters partying up, I’ll eat my hat.

This’d be another great opportunity for the archetype system to shine - but again, we see this obnoxious wall slamming down between “martial” and “magic” classes. This time it goes the other way: fighters and rogues default to low fantasy genre assumptions, and have access to archetype templates that can dial them up to high fantasy - but clerics and wizards default to high fantasy and don’t get anything to adjust that.

Tellingly, the high fantasy archetypes for fighters and rogues basically operate by bolting half a wizard to the side of their respective classes. You end up with a strange dynamic where some characters from a given piece of genre source material are valid inspirations, but not others - e.g., you can be Merlin, but not Lancelot; Gandalf, but not Legolas; Medea, but not Achilles. Again, we see this reactionary notion that only spellcasters are allowed to play in the big-kid sandbox; the game’s text openly acknowledges as much by flat-out stating that only full-progression spellcasters are relevant when determining which tiers of play a party can engage with. And again, the tools to fix that are right there; the game just doesn’t deign to pick them up and use them.

I could keep going, but I suspect I’ve harped on long enough that y’all get exactly where I’m coming from here. It’s like… these are not new problems. Maybe not all players care about them, but it’s nearly universally acknowledged that they exist, and it would have taken so little effort to address them - the game literally developed the perfect tools to do so, then didn’t use them. It drives me crazy to see a game come so close to what could have been a legitimately revolutionary take on the genre, then deliberately stop juuuuust short of the goal line.

Dead Space 1 & 2 by Visceral Studios was one of those games that I felt done those Resident Evil 4 gimmicks and camera right again compared to other 3rd-person shooting games at the time that kept trying to mimic it. Wasn’t as good as RE4 but it was a good replacement to the action based RE5 at the same time.

These games had that isolation like Metroid Fusion with almost no one in sight to comfort you and before Dark Souls, you couldn’t pause in this game so all your inventory is on Issac 24/7, literally! The menu is from a hologram of his suit and the health bar among other U.I. is positioned on his back at all times keeping you in on the atmosphere.

EDIT:

Forgot! But after being reminded, unlike Resident Evil 4, you could actually move and shoot alongside a quicker real-time menu.

The Necromorth enemies were varied and tough especially on harder difficulties. In fact, to fully make them as grotesque as possible, the art crew viewed corpses as reference, yeah let that sink in…

Endlessly spamming ammo wasn’t enough, you had to carefully remove their limbs before finishing them off. This was stressful on harder difficulties with limited ammo so careful aiming meant life or death.

There were these cool gravity shift sections were you could fight in zero gravity so there was more than just being isolated in a ship and you could use zero gravity to sling objects as free ammo, long before Sony’s Gravity Rush did it all way better.

The second game is were it was at. Issac was a more developed character but you could still felt how lost and confused like he was too. Levels were more varied too from crew living quarters during the opening scene chaos, a church with blood-written cryptic symbols and a revisit to the USG Ishimura from the first game.

There was also ‘that’ scene. (Guess).

Dead Space 2 had one of the best unlockable rewards too. After beating Hardcore Mode which limits your Saves and everything else, you get:

A Foam Finger. Which one-shots everything. Issac even does pew-pew sounds. This is up there with the Sailor Moon outfit in Silent Hill 3 and Pepsi Man in Fighter Vipers.

Issac Clarke’s two adventures were like the best ALIEN and The Thing games made that no one would create. It took the best things from those movies and rolled it all in one.

The second game had a shit forced online multiplayer that no one played but that didn’t dampen the main game. It wasn’t until the third game that it got much worse. You had micro-transactions, craftable loot and cover mechanics. This was like warning for things to come.

Dead Space would go from horror action into every other Gears of War copycat on the market that desperately wanted to market to everyone. So I’m not surprised EA axed Visceral Studios, to them they’re expendable, they’re not a cash magnet. It’s sad but true.

All in all, the R.I.G is as good as the Varia Suit and Spartan armour, hopefully the former studio staff gets back up on their feet and make another fun game again.

E.A. stinks.

A tribute to the MMO of our childhoods.

11 years.

All the time we spent playing this Massively Multiplayer Online Game, enshrining the information and history on our wikis.

And now the game, Club Penguin will officially close it’s Abode Flash doors for good.

I highly recommend playing all you can, visit all the rooms, replay all the minigames, feed and care for all the puffles you’ve adopted (or release some, if you wish), buy a lot of items, earn as many stamps as possible and just explore.

However, I’m not sure if the website will be preserved after the fall, so go to the Wayback Machine, and try to save all those recipes and activities in case someone is a blast-to-the-past searcher for fun.

Waddle on, Everypenguin.

RIP

Club Penguin

August 22, 2005-March 29, 2017

[Notice] The SplatNet service for the Splatoon game on the Wii U system will be permanently closed on September 30th, 2017. Online multiplayer battles will still be available, as this update only affects the SplatNet service. We sincerely thank all players for using this companion site for the original Splatoon game.

Nintendo’s really been going hard on colourful, family-friendly versions of genres that have traditionally been considered the province of the “hardcore” crowd: first role-based multiplayer online shooters with Splatoon, and now post-apoc wilderness survival games with Breath of the Wild.

I’m seriously wondering what genre they’ll tackle next if, indeed, this proves to be a trend.

Like, can you picture what Nintendo would do with a 4X space sim?

Or what they’d have to do to make tactical stealth assassination gameplay family-friendly?

(’cause you know they could totally do it - the question is how.)

probably-a-cryptid  asked:

Hello it's me again for like the fifth time! Are there any video game au's that you know of? I've only seen two when I've looked, and was just wondering! Oh and thanks for always taking time to make lists and stuff <3

Thanks for these requests! I don’t typically read much from this AU but here are some good ones! Let me know if I missed any!

Originally posted by klxud


Video Game/Gaming AU


[Press Start] by kaizuka, Gen, 17k (WIP)
Yuuri wakes up one day to find himself thrown into an otome game-like reality, where his love interests seem to consist of figure skaters from the Grand Prix, and many of his actions are dictated by one of three choices that pop up in a text box that only he can see. And, as he’s quick to find out, the only way out of the game is to choose a love interest and see the blossoming romance through till the end! Thumbs up!

On ICE!!! by Watermelonsmellinfellon, Mature, 23k (WIP)
The first time Katsuki Yuuri saw Victor Nikiforov perform, he realized he had a great desire to see figure skating in a video game. In fifteen years, his dream is realized. Little does he know that Victor’s attention has been caught by the very game he unknowingly inspired. Love!

Pixelated Reality by chibilysis (xyrilyn), Teen, 9.1k (WIP)
Yuuri Katsuki is a Level 230 Arch Mage - the top ranking Arch Mage in Code Regius Online (CRO) - the world’s #1 Virtual Reality Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game.Victor Nikiforov is a Level 190 Master Swordsman and Guildmaster of Fimbulwinter - a pirate/PK-killer guild. Strip away their online personas, however, Yuuri and Victor are but just two people trying to find their own place in the world.

all the dragons we have slain by brighter, Mature, 9.6k
This is why Yuuri loves gaming—the victory of it, the easy camaraderie amongst his guild, the sense that he’s part of something greater.Victor tells him, “you were incredible,” and maybe he loves that a little, too. Definitely recommend!

 Shall We Date? Let’s Skate! by Sakhyu, Teen, 4.5k (WIP)
“Shall We Date? Let’s Skate!” was the hottest dating sim game on the market … and it is also the video game one Yuuri Katsuki suddenly wakes up in. Now, Yuuri has to battle floating screens, pesky Quests, and … wait, what do you mean he’s now the main character?! Featuring poor, poor Gamer!Yuuri.

much ado about ADO by Vitali (exocara), Teen, 7.4k (WIP)
Yuuri’s first quest in the relatively popular VRMMORPG, Angels&Demons Online (ADO), was to seduce an NPC. He was trying to figure out just how to differentiate between NPCs and player characters, when he saw an angel with long silver hair and gorgeous blue eyes and thought to himself: That man is way too beautiful to be a player character.

Otome on Ice by Ethril, Teen, 9.9k (WIP)
Yuri K is a famous independent game tester that has a reputation for finding bugs and glitches that no one else can. He works mostly online through the pseudonym Eros and only gives his real name when hired to test games.Victor is the CEO of a major gaming company in Russia. Currently his top team is working on an Otome style game that they hope to turn into a RPG MMO in the near future, but first they need to do some serious testing. Christophe suggests they bring in the game tester Eros, whom they have worked with in the past, in order to test the new game “Otome On Ice”. Awesome fic so far!

Yuuri Katsuki Secret Route Walkthrough/FAQ by Metis_Ink, Gen, 2.2k
The otome community uncovers the mysteries of the Nikiforov-Katsuki Route, one of the most difficult and overly-complicated routes in a game supposedly just about ice skating. Rec’d by a follower!

This is my gift for @sunrise-and-death as part of @aftgexchange, with the prompt “Neil actually taking the time (now that he can) to figure out his feelings about his appearance, sexuality, and/or anything else like that.” I…ended up mostly projecting myself onto him, but I sincerely hope you’ll like this little thing I wrote for you :’) I hope you’ll have a wonderful winter <3 

tw: mentions of past abuse

**** 

It doesn’t bother him.

Really, it doesn’t.

That’s what Neil is trying to convince himself to believe.

Keep reading

things that would be cool in a Spyro remake

keep the rolling animation it’s cute!!

dragon statues in different poses!

more lively environments! butterflies, tiny birds, fireflies etc that are noticeably different from fodder!

new enemy animations and interactions!

no change to the gorgeous level palettes and lighting, just more sophisticated!

hopefully no ‘remake means realism’. keep the beautiful cartoon fantasy-stylised world!

animated skybox!

a little more foliage detail!

maybe bring back the scrapped idea of travelling to other worlds by boat as well as balloon!

moneybags reacts when you hit him. c:

don’t fix the double-jump in 2 pls it’s fun hahaha

(online) multiplayer hockey/speedway races!

a few more skillpoints!

characters react when you return to a level since there’s a bit of backtracking!

more Dragon Shores games!

new skatepark tricks! (and also maybe another multiplayer!)