onigiris

Rules: Tag twenty followers you want to get to know better.

Was tagged by yourdeadfallenangel

Name: Anthony

Nickname: Ant, Tony the Tiger

Birthday: October 4

Star sign: Libra

Gender: male

Secual orientation: Straight

Height: 5'9

Favorite color: Green

Time right now: 12:46 AM

Hours of average sleep: 6-7

Lucky number: 20 (critical hit!!!)

Last thing I googled: nanatsu no taizai

Number of blankets I sleep under: 3 cause my roommate likes it when his toes freeze off

Fave fictional characters: Ron Swanson, Kazuma Mikura, Tyrion Lannister, Gimli, Abed Nadir, Michael J. Caboose, Wade Wilson

Fave famous people: Do politicians count? Idk I don’t really care that much about celebrities.

Fave books: Song of Ice and Fire, Harry Potter, LOTR…. i haven’t actually read a lot of non academic stuff recently

Fave bands: Green Day, Linkin Park, Eminem, OneRepublic, Cage the Elephant, Fall Out Boy, Bad Suns, Imagine Dragons

Dream Trip: Idk. Somewhere delicious and English speaking, I guess.

Dream Job: Not entirely sure

What I am currently wearing: green shirt, blue jeans

Peeps: theprincelyclotpole psychedelic-onigiri phanwithachanceofmemeballs spy-in-the-space koalafyed grayr0cks paperscissorsrocket savecockandrolll bae-police andrewoclock loyalreek officialjaysuschrist highly-sensitive-potato celfi

anonymous asked:

do you know of any recipes/dishes for someone who would like to start cooking japanese food but isn't sure where to start?

Hi Anon! It depends on how much other cooking experience you have, honestly! Japanese food is so wide and varied that it would just depend on what you feel like trying and what you have available to you tools and ingredients-wise. I actually don’t have too many specific recipes in my repetoire; most of the time when I’m cooking Japanese food it’s because I’ve had something in a restaurant I like/heard about it from media/video games/anime and I want to learn how to make it, so I google around until I find a recipe that seems authentic and tasty. (I’d be lying if I tried to tell you P4 wasn’t the reason I learned how to make ganmodoki, for example…) 

If you’re looking for some basic dishes to try, tamagoyaki doesn’t use many ingredients but requires some practice to make. Yaki-onigiri is also pretty simple and tasty. Some of my go-to sites are NoRecipes (I used his Hamburg steak recipe recently and YEAHHHH that was good shit good shit etc) and JustOneCookbook. If you learn better from videos, I very very highly recommend Cooking with Dog, it’s the actual cutest goddamn thing I’ve ever seen and also really educational! RunnyRunny999 is also a great channel. 

Hope that helps! Good luck!!

This is just too freaking cute! who knew that giving rice balls hair bows could look this lovely? And it’s easy to do too!

The balls of rice in the picture are seasoned with Furikake (which you can either make or buy) and decorated with ham, onigiri and nori. For those who are not very good with scissors (like me), I would suggest food cutters to create the flower shapes).

The little cheese flower is really easy to make and great for decorating bentos! It’s usually done with ham, but it works just as well with cheese. Please visit the wonderful youtube channel of bento4kinds for a tutorial on how to make ham (or cheese) flowers.  

This lovely bento was created by the very talented Chika

7

Gochujang Tuna-Melt Onigiri

“Thing is, it’s always tricky to explain something with such a blunt construct, where the appeal of it all relies almost entirely on the quality of the main simple ingredient – rice. You could have walked through this life eating and thinking that onigiri is none but a ball of rice, big deal, until you’ve had a real onigiri and realized what it’s actually about – a ball of really good rice.  It makes all the difference.”