one of the best films of the year

uproxx.com
You Aren't Imagining It, 'Wonder Woman' Isn't Being Well Promoted
With only a month and change to go, Warner Bros. seems to have little interest in promoting 'Wonder Woman.'

“When Suicide Squad came out, you couldn’t escape the world’s worst heroes. They were everywhere, despite the average audience-goer knowing only who Harley Quinn and the Joker were due to pop culture osmosis. Everyone knows who Wonder Woman is. Yet a quick look at the playlist for Suicide Squad vs. Wonder Woman on the official Warner Bros. YouTube page is as different as night and day.



Approximately a month before Warner Bros. releases one of their biggest films of the year, one that will go down in entertainment history one way or another simply for being the first film starring Princess Diana, the company has released three trailers and two “Tilt Brush” videos explaining the concept art. 

At the same point in the marketing cycle for Suicide Squad, the villainous flick already had three trailers, four TV spots, a “Buy Advanced Tickets” promotional video, and fun little biographies for each member of the team. That’s a hell of a lot more promotion for a B-string list of heroes (at best) than for WONDER WOMAN.

Read the full piece here

Speaking for myself, I have seen exactly ONE commercial so far and that was two nights ago! Where I live they were showing Suicide Squad ads on basically a non-stop loop this far out from the release of SS.

HEY WARNER “BROS”!!!

daily friendly reminder that patty jenkins was supposed to be the first female director in the marvel cinematic universe (in it’s EIGHT film. marvel studios first female director will be anna boden co-directing captain marvel, it’s first female lead film, with ryan fleck. a man. it is mcu’s TWENTY-FIRST film, to be released in 2019. it started in 2008).

she was attached to thor: the dark world (released in 2013) but exited the project due to “creative differences”. in her own words “I could have made a great Thor if I could have done the story that I was wanting to do. But I don’t think I was the right person to make a great Thor out of the story they wanted to do.

now she’s the first female director of the dc extended universe (directing the first female lead of it in it’s fourth film, released in 2017. it started in 2013.) and made one of the best and most critically acclaimed superhero movies of all time, starring, for the first time in 75 years, wonder woman in a solo story.

kevin feige must be eating his fingers right now.

2

The Grammys just made it crystal clear: It values music that is plain, safe and white.

Beyoncé’s Lemonade went into the night a critical favorite by far, but every time it went up against Adele’s 25, it lost. Adele’s “Hello” took best pop solo performance over Beyoncé’s “Hold Up;” it also took song of the year over “Formation,” making for a clean sweep for Adele.

The Lemonade visual album — arguably the most powerful aspect of Beyoncé’s release, and a film widely hailed as one of the most ambitious and profound creations in that medium — was beat out by a Beatles tour documentary for best music film.

We’ve seen this special brand of erasure year in and year out at the Grammys. For the past eight years, white artists have taken the show’s album of the year award over black artists. 

Adele’s win simply reinforces the norm and provides even further proof that Grammy voters have trouble recognizing quality black art. Read more (Opinion)

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anonymous asked:

hey, can you break down the differences between the adventure zone and critical role for me? i haven't listened to either and now i'm curious

Oh gosh, okay. They’re delightful but… very different approaches to the same general idea (broadcasting a D&D game), and I think the fans of one show tend to have a sort of skewed impression of the other show, so here’s my thinking.

Just the basics, to begin with: The Adventure Zone started running in late 2014, and it’s an audio-only podcast in which the McElroy brothers and their dad start a brand-new D&D campaign from scratch. Critical Role started running in early 2015, and it’s a video podcast in which a bunch of best-friend voice actors started filming the D&D campaign they’d already been playing for years at home with the same characters. TAZ is (generally) prerecorded and lightly edited down, CR is 100% live. Both have a lot of howlingly funny and surprisingly touching moments, both get a lot more intense the more you get into them, and both are good shows that are a Good Time, especially when they make you feel things you didn’t sign up for. The main canon of TAZ is currently 56 one-hour-long episodes, with new episodes every two weeks, and CR is currently 85 four-hour-long episodes, with new episodes every week. Most of the reason for CR’s absurd length comes down to (a) three times as many players, and (b) no editing.

The DMs both put a ton of work into the world, but they also have very different approaches. Griffin (TAZ) is DMing for the first time, while Matt (CR) has talked about how DMing D&D games for the past 20 years is what got him interested in acting in the first place. The world of TAZ is much more of a sci-fi/fantasy hybrid, while CR sticks more to traditional fantasy.

TAZ plays fast and loose with the rules, which can be both a delight and a frustration for storytelling reasons—for instance, until the latest arc both spell slots and HP were not really tracked, which means (a) Griffin has had to come up with incredibly creative ways of introducing risk and limitations to the game, and (b) those incredibly creative ways can start to get pretty damn brutal. The mechanics of the game feel like an imposition on the story, most of the time—it’s rare that you get a dice roll that makes a huge difference to the plot (but when you do, as in the most recent episode, it’s pretty darn cool). As a result, the biggest spanner in the works of Griffin’s plans tends to be in the form of out-of-the-box thinking from his players, which they excel at; I think there is a tendency to railroad the plot as a result, but it’s a good story and it’s well worth a little bit of elbowing to keep everyone on track. Magical items also play a huge role, with viewers of the show submitting awesome new trinkets for the heroes of the story to use/abuse/completely forget about.

Because CR tilts more towards the rulebook (although Matt gets more than his fair share of shit for homebrewing and letting things slide and defaulting to the Rule of Cool), chance plays a much bigger role in the story. Matt’s simultaneously battling some incredibly creative players and dice that seem determined to roll as dramatically as possible. Entire subplots have been wiped out by a strategic roll, and in order to be able to adapt to that on the fly, Matt has to be hyper-prepared and have a lot of possible branching points. It’s absurdly open-world, especially now that the characters have the ability to travel instantly through different planes of existence, and Matt keeps pace with a story that feels more character-led than DM-led; railroading is practically nonexistent, which means you get incredible plot developments and super-deep characterization… but it also sometimes leads to long circular conversations trying to figure out what to do next. Because the players are all actors, there’s also a lot more that’s just straight-up improv theater: it’s not unusual (especially lately) to go for verrrry long stretches of riveting conversation without anybody rolling dice (I can think of a moment where Matt could’ve just had everyone fail a charisma saving throw against an NPC but instead just straight-up charmed them all in real life with words).

I’ll put it this way: CR is a basketball pickup game between friends who’ve been playing together so long that they kind of have their own home rules going and stick to them. TAZ is out there playing fuckin’ Calvinball. Both are great fun, but if you go into one expecting the other you’re in for a bad time.

Both shows have a lot of great NPCs, although Critical Role’s format gives them a lot more time and depth to shine (there are episodes where an NPC will have as much or more “screen time” than some of the player characters). Both shows have LGBT representation among player characters and NPCs alike that, while not perfect, is generally improving as the show goes on. For me personally, one of the more frustrating things about going from CR to TAZ was going from three female player characters and a metric fuckton of extremely deep characterization for all the female NPCs to no female player characters and many great and memorable female NPCs who nevertheless don’t get too much screentime or development just because of the the structure of the show.

TAZ is pretty shaky throughout the first arc (Griffin’s fighting a bit of an uphill battle getting everyone to sit down and actually play the game, which is funny in and of itself), but things slowly start to come together and the real potential of the show becomes clear once they break the heck out of the 5e Starter Set. I think the “Murder on the Rockport Limited” arc is what started to pull me in, and it’s not until the latest arc that I’m starting to get the character development I really crave in that show. Critical Role also takes a little while to find its footing, and to me the Briarwood arc (starting around episode 24) is where the mood of the show starts to solidify, with episode 40 and beyond really pushing from “this is cool, I’m enjoying how these interpretations of fantasy tropes are sometimes kinda unusual and off-the-wall!” to “how is this the most honest and genuine character development I’ve ever seen in media what the heck is happening here”.

So yeah. TAZ isn’t total chaos with no plot or effort put into it, CR isn’t a humorless wasteland of mathematical minutiae and rigid formulaic approaches. Both shows are great fun, both are IMO in an upswing and getting better and better as they go along, and I heartily recommend them both if you know what you’re getting into. Have fun!

so you mean to tell me beyoncé gave us one of the greatest albums i’ve ever heard, combined with a literal art film rather than music videos and put her everything into this literal artistic and musical feat so y’all could give adele best record and album of the year for basically rereleasing her last two albums with new and terrible vocals

k.

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Hey Elizabeth! Don’t you have some racist AF, rape culture promoting, homophobic POS movie to make? 

1. Racist AF: the Asian character in both “Pitch Perfect” movies is literally a human joke with no real dialogue, just “weirdo” surreal one-liners. The Latina character in the 2nd movie is the same, and the jokes involve how little her life is worth because she’s Latina. And Banks directed that one! 

2. Rape Culture promoting: see this post - Rape Culture 101: “No Means Yes”

3. Homophobic: the black character’s lesbianism is literally joked about in the first movie and treated with a “hush hush wink wink” vibe from the other girls throughout both. The “Bellas” all treat it as something embarrassing and it’s only treated as normal the one time in each movie that the character shares an anecdote about herself.

To be clear:

1. I’m not saying that Spielberg shouldn’t make more movies with women leads, far from it!

2. I AM saying that it’s peak white feminism when you read through Spielberg’s Wiki or IMDB filmography, see The Color Purple, and not know that movie STARRED OPRAH WINFREY AND WHOOPI GOLDBERG. 

Millennials and young people, you have an excuse - Banks doesn’t. She is 43 and was 11 when the movie came out in 1985. The movie and actresses were nominated for Oscars in ‘86 and Goldberg won the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress. This was not some college film that Spielberg made, it was nominated for 10 Oscars.

3. I am ALSO saying that “Pitch Perfect 2″ directed by Banks was one of the most offensive movies I’ve watched in years (yeah I know there are worst movies, I don’t seek out shit), especially the “throwaway life / who cares if I die” joke line on the Latina character. 

Elizabeth Banks - work on your own shit, hire women of color as writers, and watch The Color Purple for f*cks sake

I think everyone should atleast consider seeing Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2, whether you’re a Marvel fan or not.

Yes, it’s got everything that you’d expect from it. Good comedy, bright colours, incredible landscapes and action sequences that many people loved about the first film.

But it’s also a film heavily based on familial relationships and righting wrongs and the film does both narratives justice. We get to see excellent portrayals of non-romantic relationships, bonds between siblings, mentors, best friends, fathers and their sons. It’s about how our family aren’t necessarily our relatives. How mistakes and human nature, both big and small, can make a huge difference, but how they can also be amended in genuine ways. It’s touching, especially the end. That’s so rare in films nowadays, more so sci-fi/action films like Guardians.

Get out there and see Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2. I can honestly say it’s one of the best films I’ve seen this year.

Happy Birthday, Marilyn Monroe (June 1, 1926).


Georges Belmont: If I asked you what does it feel like being Marilyn Monroe, at this stage in your life, what would you answer?
Marilyn Monroe: Well, how does it feel being yourself?
GB: Sometimes I’m content with myself, at other times I’m dissatisfied.
MM: That’s exactly how I feel. And are you happy?
GB: I think so.
MM: Well, I am too, and since I’m only 34 and have a few years to go yet, I hope to have time to become better and happier, professionally and in my personal life. That’s my one ambition. Maybe I’ll need a long time, because I’m slow. I don’t want to say that it’s the best method, but it’s the only one I know and it gives me the feeling that, in spite of everything, life is not without hope.

5

Born into a traditional Mexican Catholic family in the 1940s, Graciela Iturbide was expected to become a wife and a mother. And that she did—with a camera in hand. Gifted a camera by her father before leaving home for Catholic boarding school, she began shooting black-and-white film photographs and never stopped.

As a young woman she navigated a brave path, carving through the male-dominated photography scene of the 1970s to become one of the best-known photographers in the world.  

Over her long career Graciela has been both filmmaker and photographer, student and mentor and, as she turns 75 this year, she is both artist and subject in a new a graphic biography—a first for Getty Publications—about her life and her story titled Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide.


Read the behind-the-scenes making of Photographic here. You’ll see Graciela’ neighborhood, her studio, and meet the author and illustrator bringing her story to life.

When All Time Low released The Party Scene I was 14 and a freshman in high school. One of my best friends, Eric, burned it for me and told me Circles would “be my shit.” 

Earlier this month, All Time Low released their seventh studio album, Last Young Renegade. I’m now 26 and heading into the second year of my PhD. Eric is about to finish film school. And you know what? Even though we aren’t as die-hard about the band as we used to be (I’ve seen them 11 times but the last time was in 2014), we still call each other every time they release an album to talk about what we think. Yeah, All Time Low has evolved and matured, but so have we. It’s nice.

Lin-Manuel Miranda on His Lifelong Oscars Obsession and Why the Show Still Matters (Guest Column)

The Hollywood Reporter
February 20, 2017

During college, Lin-Manuel Miranda and a friend used to improvise interpretative dance tributes to best picture nominees at their annual Oscar party. “It was a lot of breathing and rolling around,” recalls the creator of the Broadway smash Hamilton. “We had a great Seabiscuit dance one year.”

For the New York-born son of Puerto Rican parents — his father a political consultant, his mother a psychologist — it was just another phase of a lifelong fascination with the Oscars that began when he was growing up in the Inwood section of Manhattan, playing and replaying the telecasts that his family recorded on their VCR. At 37, Miranda is about to cross the threshold from superfan to participant: “How Far I’ll Go,” which he wrote for the Disney film Moana, is nominated for original song, and on Feb. 26, Miranda (with his mother) will attend his first Academy Awards.

It’s an auspicious step in a career that will see him star with Emily Blunt and Colin Firth in Disney’s 2018 Mary Poppins Returns and collaborate with composer Alan Menken on the studio’s live-action The Little Mermaid, one of Miranda’s favorite films and, he reveals here, the gateway to his Oscars obsession.

My brain is a compendium of Oscar moments: Tom Hanks’ beautiful acceptance speech when he won best actor for Philadelphia in 1994. Roberto Benigni climbing over chairs and wanting to make love to everybody in the world when Life Is Beautiful won best foreign-language film in 1999. Kim Basinger presenting in 1990 and telling the audience that one of the best films of the year, Do the Right Thing, was not nominated. For her to take a stand, 25 years before #OscarsSoWhite, was incredible — and impressive because time has shown the prescience of that film.

I expect we’ll see more of that this year. It’s a political time, so I imagine the Oscars will look exactly like your Twitter or Facebook feed. Why should we ignore for three hours what we’re talking about 24 hours a day?

The Oscars were always a family affair when I was a kid. One sort of unintentional tradition we had every year was during the “In Memoriam” part of the show. My family called it the “She died?” section because my dad, who is pop culture-oblivious, would always go, “She died? He died? She died?!” the whole time. So, it was very sad and yet also very funny watching my dad catch up.

When I was a kid, the Oscars felt like this impossibly larger-than-life thing. The first time I felt like I had a horse in the race was in 1990. I was 10, and The Little Mermaid was up for best song and best score. They did that crazy “Under the Sea” number with the late, great Geoffrey Holder and dudes in scuba outfits tap-dancing with flippers. We had a tradition of recording the show on our VHS, and I must have watched it a million and a half times.

There was also an amazing Chuck Workman montage at the beginning of the show that depicted 100 years of filmmaking with classic scores. I was already in love with movies, but this was the most beautiful thing I’d ever seen in my life.

That was the period when Billy Crystal was hosting, and I would memorize his musical spoofs of the year’s top films. He did them with Marc Shaiman, whom I’m working with right now on Mary Poppins Returns… I was a huge fan of those moments and musical numbers — they showed a genuine love of movies while still poking fun at them. I may also be the only person in America who laughed his ass off to “Uma, Oprah. Oprah, Uma.” David Letterman’s commitment to that bit was enough to put it over the top for me. He didn’t care if no one got it. In his head, it was funny.


Hosting the Oscars is not a thing I would ever want to do… You always have to do this dance as a host: You’re playing to a billion people at home, and you’re playing to anxious contestants in a room, and that’s an insanely hard thing to divide. It’s the most thankless task in the world. I have a pretty healthy ego, but it does not extend in that direction. I’d much rather be the guy writing the opening tune than having to deliver it.


Another Oscar moment that really stuck with me was when Whoopi won her best supporting actress for Ghost. I’ll never forget, at the top of her acceptance speech she said, “Ever since I was a little kid, I wanted this,” which is so rare. Then she said, “As a little kid, I lived in the projects, and you’re the people I watched. You’re the people who made me want to be an actor.” For me, it was like she was saying, “If you want this, you can get it, too. I’m proof that you can.”

I had been seeing myself in this world since I was old enough to do anything, and it was as if she reached through the screen to talk to me. I was that kid. Even my mother used to say, “Remember what Whoopi said.”

That speech was the inspiration for the opening song I co-wrote for Neil Patrick Harris, “Bigger,” for the 2013 Tony Awards:

There’s a kid in the middle of nowhere sitting there, living for Tony performances singin’ and flippin’ along with the Pippins and Wickeds and Kinkys, Matildas and Mormonses / So we might reassure that kid and do something to spur that kid  / ‘Cause I promise you all of us up here tonight, We were that kid and now we’re bigger


Another of my favorite moments was in 2005, when they had Antonio Banderas sing “Al Otro Lado Del Rio” from The Motorcycle Diaries, which was nominated for best song. And then when Jorge Drexler, who composed it, won, he went onstage and sang it, like, “This is how it really goes.” It was so funny and ballsy and great. I’m happy whenever Latinos win anything, so I was thrilled by both performances.

I can’t tell you what it feels like in that room because this will be my first time at the Oscars, but I can tell you why the Oscars matter. It’s a night when the arts and artists are formally honored, and this recognition is seen by millions of people across the country and around the world. The show inspires people to keep pursuing their craft, or to seek out the nominated films or the overall body of work of the nominees, and through that exposure, people gain a greater appreciation of what the art of filmmaking brings to our culture.

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Resilient is the best word to describe these trees. One of the longest living life forms on the planet the Bristlecone Pine love harsh environment of high altitudes near 10,000 ft (3300m), here filmed at moonset under starry sky of White Mountains #California, near #Bishop. This twisted pine is ~ 3600 years old and the oldest ones are at their 5000 years! Follow me @babaktafreshi for more of the world’s starry nights.

BANGTAN UNIVERSITY

COMING SOON: A collaboration of one shots based off the fictional world of Bangtan U. A series by @eradikeats-writes and @kpopfanfictrash 

PLEASE MEET:

Kim Seokjin, Dean of Bangtan University. Reserved, refined - except when he’s relating to the youths by cracking the world’s best puns

Originally posted by jjilljj

Kim Namjoon, Art Professor. Has published five books in four years on Bernini and sculpture. Loves to discuss how Roman technique copies the Greeks - a constant theme throughout their culture

Originally posted by fyeahbangtaned

Jung Hoseok, Film Professor.  Writes in his free time on global cinema and sexuality. Leads the campus student film society, frequently holds get-togethers at his own apartment to watch Mullholland Drive and eat cake.

Originally posted by jminies

Min Yoongi, Librarian. You talk in the library, you die.

Originally posted by icons-bts

Park Jimin, Chemistry TA. Studying organic chemistry because he wants to change the world. Can’t understand why his study sessions are always packed with females. 

Originally posted by armygzb

Kim Taehyung, Theatre and Performance Arts. Better dressed than his students. Favors cutting edge techniques and methodologies. Most likely found by the lakes, followed by his bevy of aspiring actresses. 

Originally posted by theseoks

Jeon Jungkook, Poetry Professor. Both the youngest professor and the closest to tenure. Brilliant, often waxes poetic beneath the shade of various trees. Maintains Auden is the standard for all longing.

Originally posted by jminies

MASTER LIST AND SCHEDULE


Tom laid on his back in his black and white suit on the hotel bed while Harrison banged on the bathroom door. His hands were folded across his chest as chuckled at [Y/N] and Harrison’s bickering through the closed door.

“Ease up, mate.” Tom yawned. The only downfall of being invited to events was switching time zones. Rubbing his eyes, he sat up. “We did only give her a three hour heads up.”

Harrison huffed, rolling his eyes while leaning against the opposing wall. “But aren’t girls usually good with last minute things?”

Tom raised a brow, “Um, I think it’s the exact opposite really. Girls always take forever to get ready.” Chucking one of the pillows at him, he laughed. “Even if we left right now, we’d be early.”

“I don’t even care about leaving, I just have to take a piss is all.” Harrison replied with a slight twinge of irritation kissing his words. “I could do so if someone would hurry their arse up!”

“Bloody fucking Hell, Haz.” [Y/N] yanked open the bathroom door, her face in a scowl. “Need to take a fucking whiz, do you? Go for it you little shit.” Her hand gesturing to the toilet.

Harrison stood up straight, his jaw dropping at the sight of his friend. Sure, he had seen her dolled up before but that was the thing. He had seen her in thousand dollar gowns for movie premieres but never like this. Never so simple and breathtaking.

Her hair was loose and wavy instead of pinned back in an intricate way. Her lips were dusted lightly with a soft pink and all he could focus on were her lashes. Not a lick of makeup were touching her lids except mascara and maybe a little dash of nude shimmer. Her cheeks were rosy but that came with her frustration. It was strange to see [Y/N] so dolled down but up at the same time. It was messing with his brain.

“Cat got your tongue, mate?” Tom teased as he stood up to see why Harrison suddenly froze up. As he rounded the wall, he stopped dead in his tracks. “[Y/N], you-you look stunning!” Just like Harrison, Tom was at a loss for words.

Her cheeks flushed, “Thank you,” tucking a chunk of hair behind her ears, “come on guys, it’s not that different from what you’re used to.”

Harrison shook his head, still unable to produce words. Scratching the back of his head, he exchanged looks with Tom. “You look incredible, [Y/N].”

Chewing on her lip, she glanced down at the last minute dress she had snagged from one of the LA shops on her strip. “I don’t know if this will do though.” She smiled at their expressions, Tom and Harrison weren’t the very best at hiding their facial movements. “You two look sharp! This dress is so simple and-”

“-perfect.” Tom responded, shaking his head, still unable to wrap his head around how beautiful she looked. He had gotten the chance to work with [Y/N] on a small film a few years back and built a very on and off again friendship. It wasn’t anything like an on and off again relationship but more or so they’d hang out like crazy and then months would pass by without either of them speaking a word to each other. It was just how it happened to work out.

One would spark up a conversation through text or twitter and the cycle would repeat. Harrison just got to know [Y/N] by default and had a similar style friendship. The only difference was that he’d spam her on a regular basis with funny memes. Tom would just kind of forget until she’d pop up on his instagram feed and the memories of their fun would play in his brain like a movie. 

“I have to agree with Tom on this one, [Y/N].” Harrison grinned as he winked at her. “You’re really hot.” 

Playfully rolling her eyes, she swatted Harrison. “Shut up, you sarcastic asshole.” 

Harrison laughed, “But I’m not being sarcastic this time!”

Rolling them again, she chuckled. “Go take a piss and we will leave, okay?” Shoving Harrison in the bathroom, she closed the door behind her. Looking at Tom, she motioned behind her. “How in the world do you handle all the time?”

“With great difficulty.” 

“I give you props, oh, here let me fix your bow.” She took a step forward, her hands gently readjusting the bow-tie. Her breath hitched in her throat when she finally noticed Tom looking at her. 

“[Y/N],” He started.

“Yes?” She whispered.

“I think we shouldn’t drift apart this time….”

Nodding, “I agree.” 

4

Believe the hype: ‘Hidden Figures’ is as great as it looks

The choice to give Hidden Figures an Oscar-qualifying run ahead of its wide release next year was a wise one: This movie is a home run, a veritable fist-pump of a film that celebrates the tremendous success of these women while never forgetting exactly how difficult their journey to the stars was.

Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe are all terrific — the latter coming off an incredible debut year as a film actress, having also co-starred in Moonlight — and the supporting ensemble is strong across the board. (Hidden Figures makes for a great best ensemble SAG nominee.) Their performances, with Schroeder and Melfi’s smart script in tow, keep these figures from becoming mere chess pieces in history. Their wants, their needs, their loves and their pains are rendered with specificity and sympathy.

In truth, Hidden Figures would have been required viewing no matter what because of its historical importance. But now, it’s a movie you’ll be anxious to see again minutes after walking out of the theater. Read our full review

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Why you should see wonder woman

FULL OF SPOILERS !!!!!!  (and swears)



I did not at first realise what an emotional experience this film would be, but FUCK ME on watching the first few scenes I felt the tears spring forth like fucking fountains of glory.

It was seeing all those strong women on screen, those incredible women, unsexualised and with agency of their own, that completely undid me and I didn’t stop weeping until the film was over.

So here is a list of 15 reasons why Wonder Woman was the best damn film of this year:

  1. The Amazons will have you wanting to take on the patriarchy with a bow and arrow in 10 seconds flat. A society of women, who love and support one another. A mother-daughter relationship unspoilt by ‘female jealousy’. LESBIAN ISLAND (also I am gay for every single Amazon ever.)
  2. The soundtrack will take you from 0 to I-wanna-punch-a-nazi really quickly.  
  3. I’m not really one for heterosexual white guys in films, but Steve Trevor is a good and brave soul and never, not once, does he treat Diana as his inferior. From the moment she rescues him from the sea he treats her as an equal and respects her and supports her. AND THIS IS WHY SHE LOVES HIM.
  4. Diana listens to no man. Not even the man she is romantically involved with. When he tells her not to get involved, out of his fear she will be hurt, she fucking gets involved anyway. In fact, the whole film can be boiled down to Steve going; ‘Stay here.’ and Diana going; ‘Fuck that.’
  5. Wonder Woman is canonically bisexual.
  6. It might be because I’m a slut for history but Diana calling out WWI generals on their old world Victorian values made my Fucking Day. ‘A real general fights alongside their soldiers.’  Queen of my heart.
  7. Diana asking why women would want to hold their tummies in. We don’t Diana thank you for asking, bc tummies are beautiful.
  8. Everyone telling Diana she can’t save everyone, to which she responds, ‘Watch me.’
  9. Steve saying, ‘It’s no man’s land, no man can cross it.’  and Diana, the fucking icon that is, going ‘I am no man.’ (it’s in subtext) And the costume!?? Fuck me. No seriously, fuck me.
  10. There is a Moroccan and a Native American character, the Moroccan character highlights racial issues that stop him reaching his dreams and the Native American character calls out white Americans on their genocide of his people. (having diversity in a film set in 1918 just sticks a big ol’ middle finger up to any film who has said ‘diversity isn’t historically accurate’)
  11. There is also a character with an invisible disability; Charlie has, one presumes, PTSD and not only does this highlight and give representation to people with mental illness, but the other male characters genuinely care for his emotional wellbeing. Men emotionally supporting other men! Men showing their emotions!! Men caring for one another tenderly!!!!
  12. None of these characters die. Only the het white guy dies, in a nice twist on the ‘female love interest dies to give het white male lead Angst’ trope.
  13. Humans aren’t good, we don’t deserve Diana (damn right we don’t) but we have goodness in us and it’s a choice!! 
  14. ‘I believe in Love.’
  15. War is a white old guy, and Diana destroys him. The overwhelming message of this movie is peace and love and in this shitshow we call the modern world, we need more movies with this message.


OH WAIT I FORGOT ONE!!! ‘Men are unnecessary for pleasure.’  !!!!!!!

So... I went to see Wonder Woman tonight...

And let me tell you - We were all amazed at Batman’s fight scene in Batman v Superman [when he was saving Ma Kent] - But he’s got nothing on Ms. Prince. Sorry, Batman-lovers [I am one, too, but…NO SPOILERS. But let me briefly talk about the fight choreography in WW - Kick. Ass. Ms. Jenkins did a tremendous job on this film. And Gal Gadot - Her portrayal of Diana of Themyscira was so effective that there was this one particular scene in the middle of the film that made me truly see why she was chosen to play the role - I can’t say no more coz I’d end up spoiling it for you guys D: But go see it! Oh, man, maaaaan. We need another Wonder Woman movie soon, is all I can say. 

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The 2017 Oscar acting nominees are the most diverse lineup in a decade

  • After two straight years of #OscarsSoWhite, the Academy produced their most diverse lineup of acting nominees in a decade — and tied the record for their most inclusive ever.
  • Seven actors of color (specifically, six black actors and one Indian actor) earned nominations for the film industry’s highest acting honor.
  • The number ties 2007 and 2005’s record of seven. The seven nominees of color are:
    • Denzel Washington, Fences
    • Ruth Negga, Loving
    • Mahershala Ali, Moonlight
    • Dev Patel, Lion
    • Viola Davis, Fences
    • Naomie Harris, Moonlight
    • Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures
  • Like 2007, which featured multiple nominees from movies like Dreamgirls and Babel, 2017’s list was buoyed by multiple nods for movies like Fences and Moonlight. Those two, plus Lion and Hidden Figures, are best picture nominees as well.
  • Only four years have featured more than five nominees of color in the Oscars’ acting categories: 2017, 2007, 2005 and 2004 (with six). Read more

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