one hundred forty nine

1000

21000 = 10 715 086 071 862 673 209 484 250 490 600 018 105 614 048 117 055 336 074 437 503 883 703 510 511 249 361 224 931 983 788 156 958 581 275 946 729 175 531 468 251 871 452 856 923 140 435 984 577 574 698 574 803 934 567 774 824 230 985 421 074 605 062 371 141 877 954 182 153 046 474 983 581 941 267 398 767 559 165 543 946 077 062 914 571 196 477 686 542 167 660 429 831 652 624 386 837 205 668 069 376 — ten novemnonagintillion, seven hundred fifteen octononagintillion, eighty-six septennonagintillion, seventy-one sexnonagintillion, eight hundred sixty-two quinnonagintillion, six hundred seventy-three quattuornonagintillion, two hundred nine trenonagintillion, four hundred eighty-four duononagintillion, two hundred fifty unnonagintillion, four hundred ninety nonagintillion, six hundred novemoctogintillion, eighteen octooctogintillion, one hundred five septenoctogintillion, six hundred fourteen sexoctogintillion, forty-eight quinoctogintillion, one hundred seventeen quattuoroctogintillion, fifty-five treoctogintillion, three hundred thirty-six duooctogintillion, seventy-four unoctogintillion, four hundred thirty-seven octogintillion, five hundred three novemseptuagintillion, eight hundred eighty-three octoseptuagintillion, seven hundred three septenseptuagintillion, five hundred ten sexseptuagintillion, five hundred eleven quinseptuagintillion, two hundred forty-nine quattuorseptuagintillion, three hundred sixty-one treseptuagintillion, two hundred twenty-four duoseptuagintillion, nine hundred thirty-one unseptuagintillion, nine hundred eighty-three septuagintillion, seven hundred eighty-eight novemsexagintillion, one hundred fifty-six octosexagintillion, nine hundred fifty-eight septensexagintillion, five hundred eighty-one sexsexagintillion, two hundred seventy-five quinsexagintillion, nine hundred forty-six quattuorsexagintillion, seven hundred twenty-nine tresexagintillion, one hundred seventy-five duosexagintillion, five hundred thirty-one unsexagintillion, four hundred sixty-eight sexagintillion, two hundred fifty-one novemquinquagintillion, eight hundred seventy-one octoquinquagintillion, four hundred fifty-two septenquinquagintillion, eight hundred fifty-six sexquinquagintillion, nine hundred twenty-three quinquinquagintillion, one hundred forty quattuorquinquagintillion, four hundred thirty-five trequinquagintillion, nine hundred eighty-four duoquinquagintillion, five hundred seventy-seven unquinquagintillion, five hundred seventy-four quinquagintillion, six hundred ninety-eight novemquadragintillion, five hundred seventy-four octoquadragintillion, eight hundred three septenquadragintillion, nine hundred thirty-four sexquadragintillion, five hundred sixty-seven quinquadragintillion, seven hundred seventy-four quattuorquadragintillion, eight hundred twenty-four trequadragintillion, two hundred thirty duoquadragintillion, nine hundred eighty-five unquadragintillion, four hundred twenty-one quadragintillion, seventy-four novemtrigintillion, six hundred five octotrigintillion, sixty-two septentrigintillion, three hundred seventy-one sextrigintillion, one hundred forty-one quintrigintillion, eight hundred seventy-seven quattuortrigintillion, nine hundred fifty-four tretrigintillion, one hundred eighty-two duotrigintillion, one hundred fifty-three untrigintillion, forty-six trigintillion, four hundred seventy-four novemvigintillion, nine hundred eighty-three octovigintillion, five hundred eighty-one septenvigintillion, nine hundred forty-one sexvigintillion, two hundred sixty-seven quinvigintillion, three hundred ninety-eight quattuorvigintillion, seven hundred sixty-seven trevigintillion, five hundred fifty-nine duovigintillion, one hundred sixty-five unvigintillion, five hundred forty-three vigintillion, nine hundred forty-six novemdecillion, seventy-seven octodecillion, sixty-two septendecillion, nine hundred fourteen sexdecillion, five hundred seventy-one quindecillion, one hundred ninety-six quattuordecillion, four hundred seventy-seven tredecillion, six hundred eighty-six duodecillion, five hundred forty-two undecillion, one hundred sixty-seven decillion, six hundred sixty nonillion, four hundred twenty-nine octillion, eight hundred thirty-one septillion, six hundred fifty-two sextillion, six hundred twenty-four quintillion, three hundred eighty-six quadrillion, eight hundred thirty-seven trillion, two hundred five billion, six hundred sixty-eight million, sixty-nine thousand, three hundred seventy-six (302 digits, 4085 characters)

anonymous asked:

Hey, first i wanna say thank you for all the work you have on find fanfics and and sharing with us. I wanna know if you have some fic with twins? it can be ksoo ou jongin. Thank you very much ❤

Thanks a lot! I haven’t done twins in awhile! Here is the one from before. Enjoy!

Update 3/8/17- So I don’t know how but somehow I have come across 3 twin fics since putting up this list. It was recent enough that I couldn’t stand it, I have to add them. Yea more twins! (I’ll put them on top to make it easier)

Photograph: Complete 3 chapters. blind Kyungsoo falls in love with Kai, and then him and Jongin head off to their mandatory military

Only For You: One shot (kind of creepy?) Kai tries to convince Jongin to leave Kyungsoo

Fervour: One shot. Soulmate au, Kyungsoo gets 2 names on his wrist

Twins: One shot, For Kyungsoo’s birthday his boyfriend Jongin gives him an extra present 

All Mine, All Mine: One shot. Kyungsoo is dating Jongin and Kai is jealous and is always trying to trick Kyungsoo 

Recollecting Recollection: One shot. So Jongin’s twin is Chanyeol in this one, and a lot of smut happens

Heat: One shot. Jongin and Kai are wolves, only Jongin is the omega and Kai the alpha who treats him like shit. Jongin tries to get away from it all.

Same Boy: One shot, Kyungsoo and Sehun start to think their boyfriends sound like the same person

Like a Fool: one shot, this is just Jongin has a twin Kai but the story isn’t revolved around that. Kyungsoo keeps liking Jongin even though it’s a bad idea

Four-Thousand One Hundred and Forty-Nine Days: Complete 9 chapters. The twin part doesn’t come in until the end though. Kyungsoo rescues cat hybrid Kai who has been abused by his last owner, eventuality he saves his twin, too.

Twice as awesome: One shot, Jongin uses his twin to help ask Kyungsoo  out

Of Crushes and Weird Kids: one shot. Kyungsoo is complaining to Sehun that he wants to be friends with Jongin, so Sehun can’t figure out why he is talking to the other kid

Duplicate Version A: Kaisoo: one shot Jongin told Kyungsoo about his twin and how they are competitive, he just didn’t expect to meet him in that way…/ Troubled: one shot, the sequel, Kai comes to stay with them

The Wrong Twin: One shot, Kyungsoo “accidentally” hooks up with the wrong twin

making ends meet

No violins, no candlelight. No trauma, fight or danger. No long conversations or emotional upheavals. No ardent words or fleeting touches.

It just … happened …. on a sunny Tuesday afternoon while paying bills.

Joan sat on the library sofa, laptop perched on her crossed legs. “We can’t keep this up. If we, and by we, I mean you, continue spending like this, we are going to end up in our eighties huddled in the dark, burning our furniture for warmth.”

From the floor where he sat sorting notes, Sherlock looked up slightly amused at the scenario. “Come Watson, it can’t be as bad as all that.”

“Two hundred fifty one dollars for mealworms, six hundred seventy three dollars and forty nine cents for a one hour rental of a Komodo dragon…” she looked up from her laptop. “I didn’t know you could rent lizards. It would have come in handy on the Roberts case.”

“Hmm, yes,” he scrambled up from the floor and joined her on the couch.  "I recently found a herpetologist with a splendid array of specimens. Of course, the research must be done on site under his supervision. Quite a decent sort of chap.“ His face registered his excitement. "You should come with me next time.”

Joan rolled her eyes in amusement, “You are missing the point. We need to spend less or at least spend more wisely …”

“Alright,” he slumped back onto the sofa realizing she would not be derailed. “I will spend less on lizards and worms, if you will scale back on your shoe purchases.” Sherlock looked at her cheekily, waiting for the indignant reply.

She didn’t take the bait. “It’s a deal.  I’ll start shopping at Target and you at Petsmart.” Joan side-eyed a crooked smile at him.

They sat in silence for a bit as she reviewed the spreadsheet and entered more data.

“Is that how you see our future? Two wizened old souls, cuddling for warmth?”

She noted the verb change. “Yup. Wouldn’t be all that bad, would it?” Joan turned and looked at him.

“No, I suppose not. Research shows that human contact, hugging, cuddling and the like, besides physical warmth, provides a myriad of health benefits, cardiovascular …”

She scrolled down the page. “No! Sherlock! Two thousand dollars on an old door?”

Sherlock sat up and squinted at the screen. “Oh, that … that’s the door from the hotel room of that 1933 murder case I’ve been working on. I believe it has answers to yield.”

Joan shook her head, closed the cover on the laptop and set it aside.  She sighed and sat back, “I give up.”

“The door is solid oak. It shall burn quite nicely when the time comes.” He blinked at her with mock sincerity. She stared at him blankly. He tilted his head and extended an arm, “Fancy a cuddle?”

The look on his face made her smile. Joan leaned in and rested her head on his shoulder as his arm went around her shoulders.

“We are doomed!” She threw an arm around his waist.

“Yes, but we are doomed together,” he countered.

She tightened her hold on him.  "We are going to end up being that strange old couple that people laugh at aren’t we.“

"No. I won’t ever let anyone laugh at you.” He said the words with such sincerity that she looked up at him and, after a brief pause, kissed him.

Anyone who follows me and has BBC America! 

CLASS IS PRIEMIERING IN AMERICA. WATCH IT. IT’S GOOD. IT’S GOT GAY. IT’S GOT GAAAYYYYY  rich amazing, unique, fleshened out, horrifying, organic natural relationship save for once forced heterosexual pairing that falls apart episodes later, it has ALIENS. IT HAS PTSD. IT HAS EVERYTHING YOU WANT. IT HAS ALIEN PREGNANCY WHICH MIGHT BE A HYRBID, PLAUSIBLY, IT IS … UNIQUE.

IT IS CLASS!

YOU’LL LOVE IT.

IT

IS

BASICALLY

K/S IN THE DOCTOR WHO VERSE AND SPOCK IS A PRINCE AND JIM IS A POLISH GUY.

My four hundred forty-nine followers, give it a shot!

One of you

AT LEAST

ONE OF YOU.

OR FIVE OF YOU

TO MAKE IT SOAR IN THE RATINGS.

HELP US EVERY US AIRING CLASS HAS TO GET IT.

ANYONE WHO VIEWS MY BLOG AND DOESN’T FOLLOW ME

GIVE IT A SHOT

LOOK AT THE GUIDE AND CHECK WHEN IT COMES ON YOUR BBC AMERICA.

I already watched it online last year and it is AWESOME.

276

276! = 2 788 080 104 957 639 191 680 903 001 314 480 365 358 208 808 594 579 728 293 284 812 921 096 767 321 237 014 975 648 559 809 402 832 080 216 720 845 635 210 496 880 141 845 495 936 417 355 321 351 495 199 230 301 718 310 340 364 607 456 251 452 629 551 945 091 569 444 362 117 400 247 244 754 510 080 815 710 039 408 642 004 413 313 259 312 731 475 441 990 221 075 975 772 090 870 168 192 957 569 821 358 384 057 572 518 460 332 424 123 112 546 009 218 539 458 350 498 795 914 485 125 737 116 013 596 593 452 093 236 702 874 134 234 197 830 946 061 763 324 118 761 731 635 414 950 062 979 415 154 163 942 499 193 567 649 728 095 700 240 303 338 291 200 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000
Name: Two quattuoroctogintacentillion, seven hundred eighty-eight treoctogintacentillion, eighty duooctogintacentillion, one hundred four unoctogintacentillion, nine hundred fifty-seven octogintacentillion, six hundred thirty-nine novenseptu

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999

2999 = 5 357 543 035 931 336 604 742 125 245 300 009 052 807 024 058 527 668 037 218 751 941 851 755 255 624 680 612 465 991 894 078 479 290 637 973 364 587 765 734 125 935 726 428 461 570 217 992 288 787 349 287 401 967 283 887 412 115 492 710 537 302 531 185 570 938 977 091 076 523 237 491 790 970 633 699 383 779 582 771 973 038 531 457 285 598 238 843 271 083 830 214 915 826 312 193 418 602 834 034 688 — five novemnonagintillion, three hundred fifty-seven octononagintillion, five hundred forty-three septennonagintillion, thirty-five sexnonagintillion, nine hundred thirty-one quinnonagintillion, three hundred thirty-six quattuornonagintillion, six hundred four trenonagintillion, seven hundred forty-two duononagintillion, one hundred twenty-five unnonagintillion, two hundred forty-five nonagintillion, three hundred novemoctogintillion, nine octooctogintillion, fifty-two septenoctogintillion, eight hundred seven sexoctogintillion, twenty-four quinoctogintillion, fifty-eight quattuoroctogintillion, five hundred twenty-seven treoctogintillion, six hundred sixty-eight duooctogintillion, thirty-seven unoctogintillion, two hundred eighteen octogintillion, seven hundred fifty-one novemseptuagintillion, nine hundred forty-one octoseptuagintillion, eight hundred fifty-one septenseptuagintillion, seven hundred fifty-five sexseptuagintillion, two hundred fifty-five quinseptuagintillion, six hundred twenty-four quattuorseptuagintillion, six hundred eighty treseptuagintillion, six hundred twelve duoseptuagintillion, four hundred sixty-five unseptuagintillion, nine hundred ninety-one septuagintillion, eight hundred ninety-four novemsexagintillion, seventy-eight octosexagintillion, four hundred seventy-nine septensexagintillion, two hundred ninety sexsexagintillion, six hundred thirty-seven quinsexagintillion, nine hundred seventy-three quattuorsexagintillion, three hundred sixty-four tresexagintillion, five hundred eighty-seven duosexagintillion, seven hundred sixty-five unsexagintillion, seven hundred thirty-four sexagintillion, one hundred twenty-five novemquinquagintillion, nine hundred thirty-five octoquinquagintillion, seven hundred twenty-six septenquinquagintillion, four hundred twenty-eight sexquinquagintillion, four hundred sixty-one quinquinquagintillion, five hundred seventy quattuorquinquagintillion, two hundred seventeen trequinquagintillion, nine hundred ninety-two duoquinquagintillion, two hundred eighty-eight unquinquagintillion, seven hundred eighty-seven quinquagintillion, three hundred forty-nine novemquadragintillion, two hundred eighty-seven octoquadragintillion, four hundred one septenquadragintillion, nine hundred sixty-seven sexquadragintillion, two hundred eighty-three quinquadragintillion, eight hundred eighty-seven quattuorquadragintillion, four hundred twelve trequadragintillion, one hundred fifteen duoquadragintillion, four hundred ninety-two unquadragintillion, seven hundred ten quadragintillion, five hundred thirty-seven novemtrigintillion, three hundred two octotrigintillion, five hundred thirty-one septentrigintillion, one hundred eighty-five sextrigintillion, five hundred seventy quintrigintillion, nine hundred thirty-eight quattuortrigintillion, nine hundred seventy-seven tretrigintillion, ninety-one duotrigintillion, seventy-six untrigintillion, five hundred twenty-three trigintillion, two hundred thirty-seven novemvigintillion, four hundred ninety-one octovigintillion, seven hundred ninety septenvigintillion, nine hundred seventy sexvigintillion, six hundred thirty-three quinvigintillion, six hundred ninety-nine quattuorvigintillion, three hundred eighty-three trevigintillion, seven hundred seventy-nine duovigintillion, five hundred eighty-two unvigintillion, seven hundred seventy-one vigintillion, nine hundred seventy-three novemdecillion, thirty-eight octodecillion, five hundred thirty-one septendecillion, four hundred fifty-seven sexdecillion, two hundred eighty-five quindecillion, five hundred ninety-eight quattuordecillion, two hundred thirty-eight tredecillion, eight hundred forty-three duodecillion, two hundred seventy-one undecillion, eighty-three decillion, eight hundred thirty nonillion, two hundred fourteen octillion, nine hundred fifteen septillion, eight hundred twenty-six sextillion, three hundred twelve quintillion, one hundred ninety-three quadrillion, four hundred eighteen trillion, six hundred two billion, eight hundred thirty-four million, thirty-four thousand, six hundred eighty-eight (301 digits, 4100 characters)

420

420! = 1 179 832 395 293 178 259 148 587 778 443 982 767 423 908 163 629 667 689 799 210 969 550 884 231 351 169 347 804 766 799 500 510 294 050 388 349 696 532 084 729 374 087 533 384 204 019 322 892 961 178 819 464 698 121 263 533 012 685 335 273 004 294 789 382 652 477 324 465 427 001 701 326 230 145 911 466 316 029 644 714 371 748 823 861 128 004 214 806 081 770 714 277 374 544 632 880 180 009 063 325 310 867 611 466 814 559 562 175 609 414 340 177 417 478 580 290 981 292 661 586 700 768 075 544 788 360 242 053 436 899 439 186 009 859 147 147 653 878 644 064 667 799 709 427 693 731 208 035 920 284 052 203 131 022 083 688 425 805 265 631 534 978 481 761 954 009 800 546 844 281 261 649 619 610 291 306 374 918 025 956 972 209 823 833 523 561 696 079 181 976 208 783 662 818 235 613 615 149 296 343 931 089 295 234 402 130 043 253 489 826 928 097 199 211 074 340 929 916 161 625 854 705 227 595 565 090 740 962 113 793 308 742 649 598 603 963 747 960 941 063 835 474 664 306 971 892 700 806

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anonymous asked:

RE the cannon question; How would a cannon-carrying ship change the balance of power on Planetos? Same question for an Essosi city state with cannon technology?

Well, one ship can be boarded and captured even at heavy loss, but a city-state with cannon technology now can enforce its will anywhere within cannon range by threatening devastating bombardment of coastal cities. Hence the term gunboat diplomacy. 

Moreover, in terms of the balance of power, it’s a bit like what happened when the Monitor and the Merrimack gave birth to the era of the ironclad; as the London Times put it “whereas [previously] we had available for immediate purposes one-hundred and forty-nine first class warships, we now have two.” A cannon-carrying ship could manuever to maintain range against standard war galleys which needed to close to ram or board their enemies - as the Ottomans found out when they fought the Portugese for control of the Indian Ocean in the 16th century.

It’s Who You Are

A/N: This was an anon request. They mentioned that anytime the team ignores Spencer/acts like he’s annoying when he rambles, they get mad. ME TOO. Like, let my baby fanboy. He can’t help himself.

So this is about the reader chewing out the team for being mean to him. 

P.S. The chess facts are actually true from what I could find. :)

@coveofmemories

                                          ————————–

“Chess really is a fascinating game,” Spencer said, much more awake than the rest of his colleagues that morning. “The longest game possible is 5,949 moves.” He finished prepping his sugar coffee (instead of coffee with sugar, because honestly Spencer could just pour coffee into a bowl of sugar and have it be the same thing), and sipped it with one hand, wildly gesturing with the other. 

“There are nearly 169,518,829,100,544,000,000,000,000,000 (or one hundred sixty-nine octillion, five hundred eighteen septillion, eight hundred twenty-nine sextillion, one hundred quintillion, five hundred forty-four quadrillion) possible combinations for the first 10 opening moves in a game and it’s even been banned throughout the course of history.” Y/N walked in right during the middle of his ramblings on chess and stopped in her tracks before prepping her coffee. “Did you know that the first folding chess board was developed by a priest because he had to find a way to sneak it around?”

As he was talking, Y/N looked around at her colleagues. Rossi was checking his watch. Hotch was smiling, but shaking his head and Emily and Morgan had nearly checked out. “I’m sorry I asked,” JJ said, patting Spencer on the shoulder and turning away. Pretty much everyone else turned away, leaving Spencer to his cup of coffee.

“What did she ask you about?” Y/N queried, genuinely curious as to how he got to fanboying about chess. She started to fix up her coffee as Spencer sighed.

“She just asked what I did this weekend,” he said, stopping himself. Like he didn’t want to bore her like he’d bored everyone else. She motioned for him to continue. “I was just playing through a bunch of different permutations.”

Y/N hated when the team made fun of him for the things he loved. So he was different. Who cared? He enjoyed talking about things. He liked facts, so was it that much for them to let him talk without rolling their eyes, or ignoring him, or making fun of him? She knew the team loved him and he loved them too, but he did get self-conscious about it; she could tell when they turned around to leave and his face fell. She always tried to be the one to listen. To let him be excited. “That sounds awesome,” she said, mixing the sweetener into her coffee. “One day you and I need to play a couple of games. I need to see if I can beat the genius Dr. Reid. It’s definitely on my bucket list.”

The smile returned to his face as he poured himself another cup of coffee. The good doctor could down coffee like no one else you knew. Even her - and that was saying something. “That sounds awesome, Y/N. I’d love that.”

                                         ————————–

Thinking back on that morning when the team had been so dismissive of Spencer, Y/N couldn’t let it go. It wasn’t the first time it had happened, and it definitely wasn’t going to be the last - unless one of their friends and teammates lovingly chewed them out a bit. So when Spencer had gone to pick up the team’s lunch, she gathered them in the conference room.

“Guys,” she started, checking behind her again to make sure Spencer wasn’t back yet, “you guys really need to lay off Spencer.”

“What do you mean?” Emily asked, confused. Everyone looked at her like they didn’t understand what the issue was.

“Really?” For some of the smartest people in the world, they could be pretty dense. “This morning when JJ asked him about his weekend and he started rambling about chess…no one was paying attention.” She splayed her hands on her hips, getting more frustrated by the second. It irked her more than she realized. “You and Morgan checked out,” she said, cocking her head at Emily, “Hotch was shaking his head. Rossi was checking his watch and JJ you made him feel like no one cared with your ‘sorry I asked’ comment.”

They all looked at the floor. They knew it. And she knew they didn’t mean it deep down. But words could hurt. “Look, I know you guys don’t mean it - and sure he can get overly excited, but it’s who he is and as his friends, he shouldn’t feel as though he’s a burden when he talks about himself. That’s how he looked this morning when you all walked away.”

JJ looked like she’d been punched in the throat. “I didn’t mean it how it sounded,” she said quietly.

“I know JJ, but it still hurts him. You all know the type of stuff he went through as a kid. So how do you think it makes him feel when his best friends act the same way?”

Hotch looked up guiltily. “You’re right, Y/N. We’ll watch ourselves more carefully.”

“Thank you,” she said, putting her hands in her pockets, “Believe me, I know you don’t mean it, but he takes words harder than most people.” Everyone shook their heads in agreement, vowing to try harder in the future, when Spencer walked back into the BAU - lunch in his hands and a smile on his face.

                                        ————————–

Spencer had asked Y/N that Friday if she wanted to get together at the park to play chess. He’d been thinking about playing her all week long. Saturday came and Y/N walked up to the bench where Spencer was waiting with his chessboard. 

“Hey, Spence,” she greeted, passing him the cup of coffee she’d purchased on the way over.

“Thanks,” he replied, taking a sip and smiling. On this cool November day, a nice cup of coffee had the ability to warm you up from the inside out. They both wanted to take in the nice weather before it got too cold.

Over the next hour or so, Spencer and Y/N played move after move. She was pretty sure she was going to beat him - internally doing a little happy dance. “Thanks for playing with me, by the way,” he said, moving one of his pawns.

“Of course, Spence. This is fun. We should play more often. I want to make a habit out of kicking your ass,” she winked.

He huffed. “You don’t have me yet, Y/N. It feels nice to know that someone else is interested in what I’m interested in - or will at least fake it.”

So he had noticed. “You know they don’t mean it,” she assured him.

“I know,” he said, watching as she moved her last remaining queen, “It still hurts occasionally. I dealt with that kind of stuff, but x1000, when I was a kid.”

“Yea, that’s what I told them,” Y/N said, stretching her arms behind her back and smiling. She totally had him beat. He looked down at the board and she knew he saw it too.

“You told them that?” he asked.

“Yea…I…I told them they shouldn’t make fun of you when you’re just talking about something you love. It’s who you are.”

He moved his last possible piece, realizing he was beaten. “You didn’t have to do that, Y/N, but thanks. It means a lot.”

“Your ramblings are one of the things I love about you. You shouldn’t have to feel bad because you get a little overly excited,” she said.

“Do you…do you like me?” he asked, seeing the look on her face.

“I can’t believe it took you that long to notice, Spence. Yea, I do. So I don’t like it when people make fun of you.” She reached her hand across the table and placed it on top of his. “You have any other chess facts? I’m actually interested. I thought the thing about the priest was really fascinating.”

The biggest smile lit up his face. “As a matter of fact, I do, Y/N. Did you know that the second book ever printed in the English language was about chess?!”

1748

1748! = 685 557 129 020 136 728 739 109 554 073 677 018 906 446 731 497 173 347 064 598 482 154 513 406 345 300 621 818 463 659 060 241 335 350 332 536 696 363 295 401 248 668 817 806 898 245 259 790 514 105 601 866 185 689 289 237 319 142 968 316 077 746 606 414 871 225 754 097 980 350 402 278 474 236 679 957 711 129 729 121 494 248 343 250 559 477 384 498 826 553 495 794 147 415 652 651 551 183 124 225 759 915 726 195 397 531 093 151 833 403 112 806 836 881 511 479 434 979 696 662 030 622 670 493 148 766 767 098 705 692 354 070 680 068 431 477 375 932 554 589 515 277 383 061 128 223 916 822 865 865 682 161 941 558 640 037 956 915 681 313 217 701 390 228 000 185 381 312 788 888 437 220 125 842 483 085 611 604 857 401 609 576 268 928 122 944 776 047 812 977 087 366 430 783 288 150 400 785 970 836 065 654 998 751 070 857 143 847 712 624 209 570 110 190 437 975 650 481 833 757 256 133 268 494 267 932 435 180 812 144 803 281 374 726 048 695 955 281 887 473 055 638 791 722 515 207 450 699 9

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Whorf’s studies of American languages strengthened his conviction [in linguistic determinism]. For example, in Apache, It is a dripping spring must be expressed “As water, or springs, whiteness moves downward.” “How utterly unlike our way of thinking!” he wrote.

The example of whiteness moving downward is supposed to show that the Apache mind does not cut up events into distinct objects and actions. Whorf presented many such examples from Native American languages. The Apache equivalent of The boat is grounded on the beach is “It is on the beach pointwise as an event of canoe motion.” He invites people to a feast becomes “He, or somebody, goes for eaters of cooked food.” He cleans a gun with a ramrod is translated as “He directs a hollow moving dry spot by movement of tool.” All this, to be sure, is utterly unlike our way of talking. But do we know that it is utterly unlike our way of thinking?

As soon as Whorf’s articles appeared, the psycholinguists Eric Lenneberg and Roger Brown pointed out two non sequiturs in his argument. First, Whorf did not actually study any Apaches; it is not clear that he ever met one. His assertions about Apache psychology are based entirely on Apache grammar–making his argument circular. Apaches speak differently, so they must think differently. How do we know that they think differently? Just listen to the way they speak!

Second, Whorf rendered the sentences as clumsy, word-for-word translations, designed to make the literal meanings seem as odd as possible. But looking at the actual glosses that Whorf provided, I could, with equal grammatical justification, render the first sentence as the mundane “Clear stuff–water–is falling.” Turning the tables, I could take the English sentence “He walks” and render it “As solitary masculinity, leggedness proceeds.”

… The fundamentally different Hopi concept of time is one of the more startling claims about how minds can vary. Whorf wrote that the Hopi languages contains “no words, grammatical forms, constructions, or expressions that refer directly to what we call ‘time,’ or to past, or future, or to enduring or lasting.” He suggested, too, that the Hopi had “no general notion or intuition of time as a smooth flowing continuum in which everything in the universe proceeds at an equal rate, out of a future, through a present, into a past.” According to Whorf, they did not conceptualize events as being like points, or lengths of time like days as countable things. Rather, they seemed to focus on change and process itself, and on psychological distinctions between presently known, mythical, and conjecturally distant. The Hopi also had little interest in “exact sequences, dating, calendars, chronology.“

What, then, are we to make of the following sentence translated from Hopi? "Then indeed, the following day, quite early in the morning at the hour when people pray to the sun, around that time when he woke up the girl again.”

Perhaps the Hopi are not as oblivious to time as Whorf makes them out to be. In his extensive study of the Hopi, the anthropologist Ekkehart Malotki, who reported this sentence, also showed that Hopi speech contains tense, metaphors for time, units of time (including days, numbers of days, parts of the day, yesterday and tomorrow, days of the week, weeks, months, lunar phases, seasons, and the year), ways to quantify units of time, words like “ancient,” “quick,” “long time,” and “finished.” Their culture keeps records with sophisticated methods of dating, including a horizon-based sun calender, exact ceremonial day sequences, notched calendar strings, and several devices for timekeeping using the principle of the sundial. No one is really sure how Whorf came up with his outlandish claims, but his limited, badly analyzed sample of Hopi speech and his long-time leanings towards mysticism must have contributed.

Speaking of anthropological canards, no discussion of language and thought would be complete without the Great Eskimo Vocabulary Hoax. Contrary to popular belief, the Eskimos do not have more words for snow than do speakers of English. They do not have four hundred words for snow, as has been claimed in print, or two hundred, or one hundred, or forty-eight, or even nine. One dictionary puts the figure at two. Counting generously, experts can come up with about a dozen, but by such standards English would not be far behind, with snow, sleet, slush, blizzard, avalanche, hail, hardpack, powder, flurry, dusting, and a coinage of Boston’s WBZ-TV meteorologist Bruce Schwoegler, snizzling.

Where did this myth come from? Not from anyone who has actually studied the Yupik and Inuit-Inupiaq families of polysynthetic languages spoken from Siberia to Greenland. The anthropologist Laura Martin has documented how the story grew like an urban legend, exaggerated with each retelling. In 1911 Boas casually mentioned that Eskimos used four unrelated word roots for snow. Whorf embellished the count to seven and implied that there were more. His article was widely reprinted, then cited in textbooks and popular books on language, which led to successively inflated estimates in other textbooks, articles, and newspaper columns of Amazing Facts.

The linguist Geoffrey Pullum, who popularized Martin’s article in his essay “The Great Eskimo Vocabulary Hoax,” speculates about why the story got so out of control: “The alleged lexical extravagance of the Eskimos comports so well with the many other facets of their polysynthetic perversity: rubbing noses; lending their wives to strangers; eating raw seal blubber; throwing Grandma out to be eaten by polar bears.” It is an ironic twist. Linguistic relativity came out of the Boas school, as part of a campaign to show that nonliterate cultures were as complex and sophisticated as European ones. But the supposedly mind-broadening anecdotes owe their appeal to a patronizing willingness to treat other cultures’ psychologies as weird and exotic compared to our own.
—  Steven Pinker, The Language Instinct
1177

1177! = 1 185 224 119 565 992 993 526 459 115 236 696 559 809 304 896 339 252 024 348 813 709 251 351 302 149 835 488 785 491 716 717 744 764 292 327 664 298 206 738 918 918 993 771 328 019 043 713 385 020 803 297 648 264 666 240 597 970 161 898 856 492 181 405 633 181 889 002 317 509 252 768 218 962 978 320 009 352 269 669 352 171 016 090 492 733 555 248 392 959 922 019 142 653 925 837 446 181 612 690 594 501 449 378 411 196 191 959 996 195 550 842 198 111 560 503 797 812 160 042 203 595 817 778 528 389 535 281 802 070 541 558 604 673 827 559 059 551 255 586 652 940 817 584 089 868 583 353 558 206 794 249 580 520 945 147 087 032 792 079 706 810 797 445 527 109 508 510 542 165 296 316 079 873 924 531 467 423 430 287 405 868 063 847 938 861 104 009 557 024 569 061 908 896 944 428 458 308 972 624 723 515 361 766 739 852 362 453 308 795 782 745 646 089 545 167 103 845 225 460 265 951 582 261 658 831 691 816 419 521 340 964 718 324 164 199 420 789 928 277 285 006 418 343 094 845 142 075 436

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Numbers in Elvhen

about to head to bed. But before I do: I bring you numbers… IN ELVISH.

Elvish, as far as I can see, has had no numbers created for it. And well… without numbers there is no math, without math there is no major construction or architecture and… well…

Basically, without numbers, there is no Arlathan. So they’re kind of important. So far, there are only two numbers created within Elvish that we have seen, as far as I know: Sa (one) and Tan (three). Going off of these two sounds, I created some numbers that felt natural with each other, and fit with the phonetics of what we have seen so far with Elvish (staying away from hard consonants, agglutinative and fushional langauge, etc). 

1 through 10

 Elvish    |  Pronunciation

1.   Sa    |  s

ah
2.   Ta    |  tah
3.   Tan  |  tahn
4.   Ny    |  nay
5.   Va    |  vah
6.   No    |  no
7.   Noa  |  NO-ah
8.   Han  |  hahn
9.   Uan  |  OOO-ahn
10. Asan |  ah-SAHN

11 through 20

           Elvish    |  Pronunciation

11.   Asan'sa    |  ah-SAHN-ah
12.   Asan'ta     |  ah-SAHN-tah
13.   Asan'tan   |  ah-SAHN-tahn
14.   Asan'ny    |  ah-SAHN-neye
15.   Asan'va    |  ah-SAHN-vah
16.   Asan'no    |  ah-SAHN-no
17.   Asan'noa  |  ah-SAHN-no-ah
18.   Asan'han  |  ah-SAHN-hahn
19.   Asan'uan  |  ah-SAHN-ooo-ahn
20.   Alan          |  ah-LAHN

30 through 90

        Elvish    |  Pronunciation

30.   Atan      |  ah-TAHN
40.   Anan     |  ah-NAHN
50.   Avan     |  ah-VAHN
60.   Aloan    |  ah-LOW-ahn
70.   Anoan   |  ah-NO-ahn
80.   Ahan     |  ah-HAHN
90.   Anuan   |  ah-NEW-ahn

100 through 1,000

          Elvish    |  Pronunciation

100.   Salan    |  SAH-lahn
200.   Talan    |  TAH-lahn
300.   Tanlan  |  TAHN-lahn
400.   Nylan    |  NEYE-lahn
500.   Valan    |  VAH-lahn
600.   Nolan    |  NO-lahn
700.   Noalan  |  NO-ah-lahn
800.   Halan    |  HAH-lahn
900.   Ualan    |  OOO-ah-lahn
1000. Alan'en  |  ah-LAHN-en

100,000

    Elvish    |  Pronunciation

   Alan'el    |  ah-lahn-el

1,000,000

         Elvish    |  Pronunciation

   Alan'en'el    |  ah-LAHN-en-el

These numbers are stacked upon each other, like other words within elvish. For example, 9,341 (nine-thousand-three-hundred-and-forty-one) would be: Ualan'tanlan'anan'sa.

That Time of Year (To Help Those In Need)

Genre-Angst-Fluff (PG-13)

Word Count: 3,408

Warnings: swearing, i suppose child neglect but it’s not actually child neglect? like, it’s not actual neglect. idk how to explain that, but thought i should mention it.

Summary: Christmas AU where Dan and Phil first meet in a coffeeshop late at night on Christmas Eve after they find themselves unable to spend the cherished holiday with their families. 

a/n: this was originally a donated gift from me (sent as ‘deckthehowells’) to user shieldthephandom in the danandphilsecretsanta project :) the wonderful mods decided to post the reveals early, hence giving the rest of us the ability to share our work if we wanted. (i wanted to donate a gift and spent the early hours of the morning writing this thing, and at five thirty i decided i needed to sleep, so if the ending seems a bit blunt, this is why. i may go in and tweak it, but for now it’ll do.) i’m aware it’s past Christmas day, but is it really too late for another Christmas fic? i don’t think so. 

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