on the way to the monastery

I love the idea that Zenyatta is the angriest of the Shambali

that he who uses orbs of discord and knows how to fight was one who was frustrated with the suffering of the world

who saw Overwatch as a chance to help in a more active way than the Shambali afforded him

the fact that he hadn’t come home in a while, wondering if his brothers and sisters would welcome him, speaks of a Zenyatta whose beliefs don’t fully align with the other monks

And that Zenyatta found Genji and immediately related to him because he found somebody who had more anger in him than Zenyatta felt, that he, unlike the other more tranquil Shambali, could understand and guide Genji better

Zenyatta who is angry, but not weighed down by it–who uses anger as energy, who despite having left the monastery is still one of the most advanced Shambali who touches upon the Iris on a semi regular basis

Zenyatta who is passionate, whimsical (”I dreamt I was a butterfly”), strong and emotional, but who has enough mastery to use that emotion to help him succeed. Who taught Genji the same, that anger isn’t a bad thing if it’s balanced, if it’s channeled into the energy to do and be better, and to help others. 

no but (among the 1424356 other things on my list) i so need to write a book about medieval history for a popular audience, just because the reality would blow people’s minds

there are so many things you can learn from it, so many misconceptions to destroy, and such an interesting social and cultural study of people learning to do things in different ways after rome fell. they had a period of almost 1000 years where classical culture was NOT the automatic standard. that is why we have gothic architecture and script. why they invented new literary and artistic genres, why they developed new laws. where, unlike in the ancient world, women and slaves were not relegated to a position of utter inferiority – in fact, slavery was abolished throughout most of the middle ages, and only began returning in the 16th-17th century when people were determined to replicate the criteria and legal systems of antiquity. same with women. you can find records of women doctors, bookbinders, copyists, shopkeepers, traders etc throughout the high middle ages. women religious were HUGELY influential; the abbey of fontevrault in france was required to have an abbess, not an abbot, in charge. queens regularly ruled whenever the king wasn’t around. it was only in 1593 that france, for example, decided to outlaw them from public/professional life. the salic law, made by philip iv in the early 14th century, barred them from inheriting the throne and later spread throughout europe, but that was not the case beforehand.

don’t talk to me about how “feudal anarchy” was a thing. feudalism was the last thing from anarchy, and it wasn’t about a lord mistreating or killing his peasants however he pleased. it was a highly structured and regulated system of mutual obligations – not a desirable condition for the serf, but still the bedrock on which society functioned. serfs were not slaves. they had personhood, social mobility, could own property, marry, form families, and often obtain freedom once they were no longer in an economic condition to make serfhood a necessity. abbot suger of france (late 11th-early 12th century) was most likely a son of serfs. he was educated at the same monastery school as the later king louis vi, ran the kingdom while louis vii was on crusade, and became the foremost historian of the period and partially responsible for establishing the tradition of ecclesiastical chronicles.

don’t talk to me about how everyone was a fervent and uncritical religious fanatic. church attendance on the parish level was so low that in 1215, pope innocent III had to issue a bull ordering people to take communion at least once a year. the content of clerical grievances tells us that people behaved and thought exactly as we do today – they wanted to sleep in on sunday, they wanted to have sex when they pleased, they didn’t believe the guy mumbling bad latin at them, they openly questioned the institutional church’s legitimacy (especially in the 13th century – it was taking assaults on every side as splinter and spinoff sects of every nature grew, along with literacy and the ability of common people to access books and learning for themselves). in the 14th century, john wycliffe and the lollards blasted the rigidly hierarchical nature of medieval society (“when adam delved and eve span, who then was the gentleman?”) partly as a result, wat tyler, a fellow englishman, led the peasants’ revolt in 1381. yes, the catholic church had a social and institutional power which we can’t imagine, but it was fought and questioned and spoken back to every step of the way.

don’t talk to me about how they were scientifically ignorant. isidore of seville, in the frickin 7th century, wrote books and books on science and reason from his home at the center of the andalusian “golden age” in muslim spain. toledo in the 9th century was a hotbed of theology, mathematics, and writing; admiring western european observers called multicultural, educated iberia “the ornament of the world.” in the 8th century in the monastery of jarrow in northumbria (aka in the middle of FRICKING NOWHERE) the venerable bede was able to open his “ecclesiastical history of the english people” with a discussion on cultural, linguistic, demographic, historical, geographical, and astronomical details, and refers to britain’s location near the north pole as a reason for its days being long in summer and short in winter (“for the sun has then departed to the region of Africa”). while bede’s information is obviously imperfect by virtue of his social and chronological location, he is a trained scholar with a strong critical sensibility and the ability to turn a memorable phrase; discussing an attempted imperial coup by an illiterate roman soldier, he sniffs, “As soon as he had seized power he crossed over to Gaul. There he was often deluded by the barbarians into making doubtful treaties, and so inflicted great harm on the body politic.”

don’t talk to me about how they were uneducated and illiterate. they were well versed in antiquity and classical authors through the high middle ages. they didn’t just suddenly discover them again when the 15th century started. the renaissance wasn’t about finding the texts, it was about deciding to apply them in a systematic way. beforehand, the 13th century saw the rediscovery of aristotle and the development of a new philosophical system to compete with the long-entrenched and studied works of plato. thomas aquinas and the dominicans were writing in this century. dante wrote the inferno in this century. i could go on.

don’t talk to me about the stereotype of the silent and oppressed woman – we already discussed that a bit above. i should also add, women usually had voting rights on the level of their community and this wasn’t regarded as odd. i already wrote a ranty post earlier on the myth that “it was just medieval times” and thus a rapey free-for-all.

we should also talk about how a form of gay marriage was legal for hundreds of years – two men could take wedding vows in a church and live together like any other married couple (though they called them “spiritual brotherhoods”). we should also talk about the cult of male bonds between knights in the 12th/13th century, and how it was idealized as the highest form of love. i also wrote a post a while ago about richard the lionheart and how sexuality worked. so.

we should talk about how all of this was happening in the time period that routinely gets written off as basically a wash between the fall of rome and the renaissance. we should remember that the renaissance was what led to modern structures of oppression for women, slaves, etc – everyone who had been worth nothing in antiquity. we should tear into the myth of historical progress and how it was invented to justify massive, wholesale colonization, genocide, and “civilization” in the supposedly enlightened 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries – because nothing we do now, apparently, can be as bad as what those bad ol’ bloodthirsty ignoramuses did back then.

we shouldn’t idealize the medieval era as a golden age either. that is never the right way to approach history. but we should take a long, long look at why we are so insistent on our simplistic, erroneous concepts of this time period, and how exactly they serve to justify our behaviors, mindsets, and practices today.

further reading to support any of these topics available on request.

things my shakespeare professor said over the past semester

“toni morrison did not develop the career she has because she spent her time in drug-fueled orgies.” EDIT: my friend reminded me that our prof said orgies, not threesomes, and that the following sentence was “no, she spent her time at her desk producing very fine novels.”

(about acting in shakespeare) “this is not the golden globes or whatever, if you’re not white, you can still participate.”

“many important things are discovered on the way to the restroom.”

(what sonnets mean) “please sleep with me”, “i wish i could be with you so we could get it on, but you’re far away and we can’t so all i can send you is a dumb poem”

“juliet is a very smart chick.”

(a few vague threats) “oh, i laugh, but people cried.” “i will cut you.” “when i am sardonic, you will feel bad.”

(about the histories) “it’s mentally easy if you see it all as game of thrones.”

“the plantagenets were no longer in charge, which was good, because they were bitches.”

(about richard III being obsessed with anne) “i’m not just some horny dude that wants to sleep with you, it’s just that you’re so hot that i had to mow down everyone else in my way to get to you.”

“what’s the fun of throwing a party if you don’t not invite people?”

“you fuck with my kids, your kids are going in a pie.”

“the people who are in love [in comedies] are usually young, dumb, and boring.”

“comedies begin in shit places- if the play opens and the sky is falling, you’re in a comedy.”

(about ephesus in the comedy of errors) “everyone’s a witch here, let’s just bail.”

“henry VIII breaks with the roman church and fucking destroys every monastery in sight.”

“henry V started off as a party-going, panty-chasing loser.”

(about hamlet’s entrance in I.ii) “it’s always fun to arrive late to the party, it does imply that you have a fascinating social life.”

“conspiracies are erotic.”

“art, am i right?”

Our Slayer, The Goof

DM: “You come to a large and imposing gate blocking your way from a monastery courtyard. What do you wish to do?”

Slayer: “I climbed the gate!”

*rolls a 2*

DM: “You get less than 2 feet off the ground, before falling flat on your back.”

Everybody: *laughter*

Slayer: “Ok, I take a few steps back to prepare… AND I CLIMB THE GATE!”

*rolls a 2*

DM: “You’ve discovered it is a climb proof gate.”

*everybody dies laughing*

…the gate was unlocked the whole time…

anonymous asked:

Sorry if I'm bothering you but can you share why you think avatar is bad?

hoo boy man ur asking for a lot bc that show is a complete and utter M E S S. first, heres the main phrase my tibetan ass wants u to think about: its a show using asian/indigenous ppl and their devastating histories made by ignorant weeaboo white men. I want to write about it in detail bc i’ve always wanted to say something about this but never rly got around to doing it. maybe ill send this in letter format to the writers lol. anyways im going to split this up into parts. I’ll put a readmore bc its kinda long

@bryankonietzko take a nice long look if u still use tumblr lmao

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Black history month day 17: St. Moses the Black.

Saint Moses the Black (330–405), (also known as Abba Moses the Robber, the Abyssinian, the Ethiopian, and the Strong) was an ascetic monk, priest,and a notable Desert Father.

St. Moses was a servant of a government official in Egypt who dismissed him for theft and suspected murder. He became the leader of a gang of bandits who roamed the Nile Valley spreading terror and violence. Once while attempting to hide from local authorities, he took shelter with some monks in a colony in the desert of Wadi El Natrun, then called Sketes, near Alexandria. Their peace, faith. And commitment deeply influenced Moses deeply and he soon gave up his old way of life and was baptized and joined the monastic community at Scetes.

St. Moses was known for his imposing strength. He was once attacked by a group of robbers in his desert cell. He fought back, overpowered the intruders, and dragged them to the chapel where the other monks were at prayer. He told the brothers that he did not think it Christian to hurt the robbers and asked what he should do with them.

Though Moses was very zealous, he became discouraged when he concluded he was not perfect enough. Early one morning, Saint Isidore, abbot of the monastery, took Moses to the roof and together they watched the first rays of dawn come over the horizon. Isidore told Moses, “Only slowly do the rays of the sun drive away the night and usher in a new day, and thus, only slowly does one become a perfect contemplative.”

Once Moses was invited to a meeting to discuss an appropriate penance for a fellow monk who had sinned, When he came to the meeting, Moses took a leaking jug filled with water, or possibly a basket full of sand, and carried it on his shoulder. Upon being asked why he was carrying the jug, he replied, “My sins run out behind me and I do not see them, but today I am coming to judge the errors of another.” On hearing this, the assembled brothers forgave the erring monk.

St. Moses died at around 75 while defending his monastery from bandits. He is venerated in the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, Oriental Orthodox Churches, Eastern Catholic Churches, and the Lutheran Church. He is the patron saint of Africa and pacifism.

The Guide to Moon Lovers Deleted Scenes

It includes deleted and extended scenes, but also different camera angles that were shown in the previews, but not in the actual episodes.

(Warning: EXTREMELY LONG POST WITH PICSPAM! It took a lot of time and effort to create this list so please refrain from stealing and reposting!!!)

Episode 1

Riding to Songak

The various previews and trailers show many shots of Wang So riding to the Goryeo capital which never made it into the aired episode.

Episode 2

Beating a Prince

This is not a deleted scene, just a long shot shown in the preview, but not making it to the aired episode.

The Royal Apology Part 1

The episode 2 preview shows Wang So making a disbelieving sneer, similar to the one he makes in the actual episode after he hears HS demanding an apology from him, but the background behind him is different just as is the camera angle – so it’s either a deleted scene, a deleted part of this particular scene or simply a different version of it.

The Royal Apology Part 2

Talking about different camera angles, it’s clear that the PD used different camera angles in the previews and in the aired episodes. Just compare these screencaps – in the drama version the PD changes camera angle when he shows WS’s reaction after HS avoids his „apology“, however, in the preview we see his reaction from the previous camera angle.

Eun’s Black Eye

The episode 2 preview shows Jimong, BA and Won laughing at Eun’s black eye – while the scene stayed in the aired episode, this particular moment never appeared in the final cut.

The Queen and the 3rd Prince

An undescribed scene between Queen Yoo and Yo.

The Wolf Killer

The flashback showing WS surviving his fight with the wolves ends with him throwing the torch while standing on the slope of the hill with the Kangs below; however, the released stills reveal that the scene actually continued with Wang So making it down the hill and confronting the Kangs about their attempt to kill him.

Episode 3

A Stolen Look

Just before Wang So leaves Soo and Wook in the bamboo forest, he steals a look at HS and while the moment stayed in the aired episode, we only see him look away from her, not actually the moment of him slowly, almost secretly looking at her. That moment is only shown in the previews and you can see a hint of something more, something deeper in So’s eyes there.

Wang So’s Nightmare

The moment with little Wang So tied up as a hostage shown as a memory in episode 14 was originally a scene deleted from episode 3. Hae Soo came to his room to return his butterfly hairpin, but left when she saw him having a nightmare about his childhood. Supposedly the Chungju Yoo clan and Shinju Kang clan had a feud between them, so when the Yoo army was attacking the Kangs for some reason, they put So up there to stop the attack. In episode 3, So wakes up and follows Hae Soo to the stone piles and they have a discussion about motherhood (a scene which was added in the rebroadcast version) that leads So to eventually decide on covering up his mother’s plot.This is also why when Wang So tells Hae Soo that he’ll be living in the palace, she tells him to stop having nightmares. It would be such a poignant scene because it’d show that even his nightmares are actually real because So’s life has been one huge nightmare until he met Hae Soo.

The Ride to the Monastery

Originally, Wang So’s ride to the monastery in episode 3 was supposed to be slightly longer, just like his ride to Songak in episode 1.

Burning It All Down

The final cut of episode 3 shows Wang So only in the aftermath of setting the temple on fire; however the previews, stills and the way how the camera follows him after he kills the head monk reveal that the entire scene of So setting everything on fire was filmed.

Even the aftermath scene outside of the temple was longer, revealing more of Wang So’s reaction to what he has done. In the drama, we only see him completely destroyed and numb. However, based on this preview still it’s clear that while he initially felt rage and satisfaction after leaving the temple, as everything he did sunk in he started to feel remorse and numbness which is shown in the aired version of the episode.

Episode 4

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Buddhism: The Hard Questions

  • So, if Buddhism teaches us that the key to enlightenment is the cessation of desire and full acceptance of inevitable change including the fact that everything we hold dear will be taken from us then is this not the same as saying the key is not to want anything and not to care what happens?
  • Is the Buddhist path a path to happiness or just numbness? 
  • Is the Buddhist path something that can be achieved by regular people or is it just another one of those impossible religious standards that nobody can possibly meet except the rare saint?
  • How can the realization that all will be lost possibly make anybody happy much less enlightened?
  • Is enlightenment any more real than heaven or hell?
  • Why would anybody want to live without desires? Isn’t love a desire?
  • Does acceptance that we are going to lose everything make these losses less painful? How would this lessen my pain if my beloved dog was run over?
  • We all know we are going to die. Everybody dies. We have no choice but to accept this fact but does this acceptance in any way make death less frightening? According to Buddhism, it should but it doesn’t does it?
  • Where is the comfort in Buddhism? At least the Abrahamic religions hold out the remote possibility of immortality. Isn’t this far more comforting?
  • If Buddhism is a peaceful religion then why were the Buddhist nations of  China, Japan, Vietnam, Cambodia, and others so militant historically?
  • Why do Buddhists put little kids into monasteries before they even have a basic understanding of the world much less Buddhism?
  • Aren’t Buddhist monks living useless and selfish lives by living on charity so they can reach enlightenment?
  • If Buddhism is non-materialistic then why are people in Buddhist countries like China, Japan, and South Korea so materialistic?
  • Isn’t reincarnation just a way of keeping the poor people in their place by making them focus on the next world just like Christianity does?
  • Didn’t the Buddha abandon his family including his newborn son and leave his elderly father alone to eventually lose his kingdom?
  • Didn’t the Buddha refuse to ordain women at first? Aren’t women still second class citizens in most Buddhist traditions?
  • If the Buddha was just a teacher then why are there so many miracle stories associated with him? Why do people pray to his idols?
  • How is just sitting quietly going to accomplish anything? In fact isn’t it true that most of the world’s Buddhists don’t meditate?
  • Isn’t possible that the Buddha only wanted people to be compassionate and kind and the rest of the stuff is just window dressing?
  • Isn’t it true that the discourses attributed to the Buddha are often vague and even contradictory? Example: the Buddha instructs us not to believe something just because he or another teacher says it but in another discourse identifies doubt as a hindrance to the attainment of enlightenment. Is this correct?
  • Isn’t it true that Buddhism romanticizes poverty? How is this a good thing?
Emotion and Pacing in comics

One of the reasons that I love comics so much is that there are many valid ways to approach the medium. When I make comics, the parts I’m most concerned with are character and story. Everything I draw on the comic page is in service to character and story. Because of my focus on those two elements over, say, experimenting with my art and page structure, I will sometimes get criticism that my work is safe or boring. This is probably fair criticism! I don’t do a lot of experimenting with paneling or challenging storytelling or explicitly challenging artwork in my comics, because right now that’s not what I’m interested in. Maybe I will be more experimental someday, but not right now, with the kind of stories I want to tell. :)

When I make a comic, my goal is for my readers to be engaged with the story I’m telling, and the characters in that story. That’s also what I look for when I want to read a good comic. I want characters to love, I want a story to be engaged with.

For the most part, I struggle with drawing comics (most artists do, if we’re honest ;)), but there are some parts of comics I think I have a good handle on. I feel like I’m strongest when portraying emotion on the page, and I’m good at drawing those scenes out and making the reader feel what my characters are going through. Some of the techniques I use to convey emotion came from being obsessed with movies when I was a teenager, and some techniques are stolen from my holy trinity of influences: Jeff Smith (Bone), Hiromu Arakawa (Fullmetal Alchemist) and Naoki Urasawa (Monster, Pluto, 20th Century Boys). 

Of the three artists I’ve mentioned, I consider Urasawa especially to be a master of emotion and pacing. When I first started reading his comics, it was like light struck my brain; finally I saw what I’d been trying to do for years right there on the comic page in front of me! I like the way he lays out his emotional scenes a lot. Here’s an example (read right to left): 

Urasawa uses repeating panels and decompression to draw out the emotions of a scene. In this single page there isn’t a lot of movement. It’s literally just two characters staring at each other, but the tension rises going from panel 1 to panel five. Gesicht (the man)’s expression doesn’t change between panels two and five, but we literally feel his anger rising off-panel, concluding in the close up in panel 5.

There’s an excellent You Tube channel called Every Frame a Painting (I’m sure you’ve heard of it, but if you haven’t, please go watch all the videos! There aren’t many, and they’re all really informative). My favourite video is this one, about editing:

This video hit on something that I strive for in my comics: emotion takes time. When I draw a scene that is emotional, when characters are struggling with something, or celebrating something, or being challenged, I want my readers to feel what the character is feeling, and one of the best ways to do that, for me, is to take my time. To give that emotion time to breathe on the page. 

I’m going to use some scenes in my graphic novel The Nameless City to illustrate how I use decompression and pacing to underscore the emotion in my comics. To avoid spoilers and because this is getting a little long, I’m going to put it under a cut. Please read on! :)  

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4

Medivh was the Guardian of Dalaran. His cape of raven feathers catch the light in a beautiful, beautiful way. To make the feather cape, we needed five weeks to manufacture, because they were sewn together one by one. You have to organize your feathers, to place them so they catch the light in the same way. That luscious, oily hue is almost like an oil spill. It has to give you some kind of meditation into the costumes since they come from a monastery of Dalaran.

Haunted Places in Romania (according to Wikipedia)

Argeș County

Trivale Forest in Pitești - There is a legend about a maiden, daughter of a rich landowner, who loved a poor servant of her father. Her father found an old rich man for her to marry, but during the wedding day, she ran with the servant in the forest. Her father found them and killed her lover and then decapitated her. It is generally accepted that the two scary things about the forest are: the decapitated ghost of the bride and the people going into the forest to do satanic rituals.

Bacău County

Zarifopol Mansion in Filipești – Called by locals “the House of Evil”, the mansion is the site of several reports of paranormal activities: indistinct voices, bizarre sounds, steps, cold currents that “walk” through walls.

Bucharest

Bazilescu Park – Also known as Nicolae Bălcescu Park, Bazilescu Park is located in Bucureștii Noi neighborhood. Within the park is the Summer Theatre, built in 1953. During the night, in the area can be heard strident sounds and the cough of a man (whereof it is said that belongs to Bazilescu), coming from beyond the columns of the derelict theatre.

Central Girls School – Inside this historical building and its courtyard have been reports of strange sounds, cold breeze and fetid odors, but were also seen levitating objects, doors and windows that open and close without any human intervention.

Chiajna Monastery – This ruined monastery has its root somewhere in the 18th century, during the rule of Alexandru Ipsilanti. It was a big monastery, with thick walls, reason for that the Turks “confused” it and assaulted it. Moreover, some historical sources show that between its walls died of plague the Metropolitan of Wallachia, Cozma. The land and the building have never got to be sanctified. For these reasons it was abandoned, and the monastery’s bell was thrown in the Dâmbovița River, people blaming it cursed and leaving it in ruins.According to locals, the bell can still be heard ringing on full moon nights, many audio records proving this fact. Moreover, it is said that on one of the walls near the entrance can be glimpsed the face of a beautiful lady, which is said to be Ancuța, the daughter of Mrs. Chiajna, who would have been killed on the orders of her mother after she ran with her beloved without her mother’s approval. On top of that, in the area would have been several murders and numerous mysterious disappearances.

Cișmigiu Hotel – The building was closed in 1970 and reopened in 1990, when it was converted into hostel for students of the Faculty of Theatre and Film. Legend says that in a weekend, when all the students were away on vacation, a young woman from Moldova was raped and then thrown into the elevator shaft. She died there, after three hours she desperately cried for help, with no one to hear her. Many say that her screams can still be heard.

Hospital of the Posts – Previously housed in the building behind the Stavropoleos Church, Hospital of the Posts was a site of organ trafficking. It is said that, especially in long winter nights, can be heard on adjacent streets groans and cries of those who died in hospital beds.

“House of the Devil” on General Praporgescu Street – The house, which now looks degraded, is distinguished by the ivy that covers it entirely. It is the site of two tragic events: in the interwar period, a man would have killed here two women, and within a few years, a young woman would have committed suicide.Some say that on full moon nights on one of the walls of the house can be seen the number 666, symbol of the devil, and here would live a demonic entity full of hate and anger, that can be felt from afar.

Orphanage on the French Street – Legend says the house, located at number 13, is haunted by no less than 203 children’s spirits. In this orphanage were brought homeless children, even by its owner – Stavrache Hagi-Orman. He kept the kids in unimaginable conditions, without water and without food. After dozens of children died of starvation, the orphanage was closed. Locals reported voices of children crying “Water, we want water!”.

Vernescu House on the Victory Avenue – It is named by locals “Cellar of the Devil” (Romanian: Hruba lui Scaraoțchi). Here still operate a casino. It is said that in the past century, several players committed suicide inside the house after they lost the entire fortunes at roulette. Reports indicate three ghosts that haunt the house. They shake the furniture, cause air currents and sometimes even appear on the hallways of the building. Passers also reported strong odor of sulfur in the building’s yard.

Witches’ Pond – According to the legend, the pond located in Boldu-Crețeasca Forest, having a diameter of only 5 m, is the place where Vlad the Impaler was beheaded. It is said that after the 1977 earthquake many trucks unloaded debris in the pond, with the aim of stoppering it. Within weeks, the debris disappeared in its waters, although the pond has a depth of only one meter and a half. Locals say that many times when pregnant women didn’t want the child went to the pond, bathed and ridded the pregnancy. Even the animals would be scared of this place: there would be no frog or any being that lives in the pond, and the animals don’t drink water from there. The pond is famous for the gipsy witches that gather each year to Sânziene, St. George and St. Andrew to practice their magic rituals. Near this eye of water have been observed over time strange phenomena, like globular lightnings or storms started suddenly. The pond never change, doesn’t dry, doesn’t expand, whether it rains or is drought. In a video from mid-90s is shown a strange phenomenon: in midsummer, on an area of some square meters it snowed, immediately after a woman from the stunt team was terribly amused while trying to put a helmet on the head of a mannequin that portrayed Vlad the Impaler.

Călărași County

Călugăreasca Forest – It is a forest of mulberry trees, where it is said that the wind never blows. Here, people say that existed a monastery of monks, but they were killed by the Turks, and the place was made one with the earth by the pagans. The last monk killed by the Turkish army threw a curse upon them. So that, after death, the spirits of those who have defiled hands with the blood of the monks returned in thickets of Călugăreasca, from where they never found the way out.At the edge of the forest are also a lot of crosses, which legend says that stand sentry as the pagans’ spirits can not escape. People are reluctant to seek the thickets of Călugăreasca due to the curses, and the only safe place in the woods was the large white cross that reminds about the monastery and that protects those who pray next to it when the night catches them in the grove.

Cluj County

Bánffy Castle in Bonțida – Dubbed “the Versailles of Transylvania”, the castle is reportedly haunted by the ghost of a young servant who paid with his life because he revealed that his mistress deceived her husband. Another variant is that the place is haunted by the ghosts of those who died in Bánffy during the Second World War, when the castle was converted by Germans into a military hospital. Legend says that there were often seen sinister shadows that seemed to be of some soldiers, while through walls were heard strange noises, groans, sounds of footsteps or indistinct voices.

Hoia Forest – The forest near Cluj-Napoca has long been known for the mysterious events that take place here and was even cataloged as a gateway to another dimension. Dubbed “the Bermuda Triangle of Transylvania”, the forest is one of the most active areas of the world in terms of paranormal phenomena. Legends would have occurred, it seems, after a shepherd disappeared into the forest along with his 200 sheep and no one managed to find neither he nor any part of the flock. It was only the first mysterious disappearance that took place in the forest. People who accidentally pass right through active areas report skin burns, redness, irritations, headaches, amplified sensation of thirst, anxiety, sensation of fainting. Hoia Forest became famous in the world after on 18 August 1968, military technician Emil Barnea photographed in the Round Glade (Romanian: Poiana Rotundă) an UFO, the photos being among the few of this kind genuine, according to experts. Numerous accounts of villagers reported unexplained physical sensations, observations of various shapes and colors lights, strange shadows, voices and human faces. The local vegetation is often bizarre. The trees have strange shapes, even human faces can be depicted from their trunks. In 2000, Alexandru Pătruț, President of the Romanian Society of Parapsychology, caught a strange phenomenon in the forest, around the Easter: a kind of sap flowed profusely from the top of the trees. Next day, everything was dry. He also reported strange sounds of ambulance sirens, tire exploding and even cuckoo clock. The forest was included in top 15 most haunted places in the world by the American magazine Travel+Leisure.

Constanța County

Tomis Nord neighbourhood from Constanța Supposedly, the neighbourhood is haunted by a woman who was decapitated by her husband who believed that he was cheated on.

Dâmbovița County

Bride’s Trinity on DN7 – On national road DN7, near the town of Găești, there is a monument called Bride’s Trinity or Margareta’s Trinity. Here it is said that on 24 September 1936, Margareta Ștefănescu died in a car accident, even on her wedding day, and since then the place has become cursed.  In the area have occurred a lot of fatal crashes, even if the road is straight and with maximum visibility. The road was “baptized” by locals “the Road of Crosses”. In the road tragedies are involved especially men. For example, only in 2008–09 in that place 12 young men died, mostly unmarried. Likewise, there were several reports of a silhouette of a woman dressed in white near the trinity.

Dolj County

Radovan Forest – Dozens of people, especially men, have drowned over time in Lake Fântânele of Radovan. Locals put numerous tragedies on account of the curse of a bride, who legend says that in the 1940s hanged herself in the forest surrounding the lake. Her story has two versions: one, according to that a young Moldovan woman arrived in Oltenia with her family, would have committed suicide after her husband was beaten to death on the night of the wedding; the second version says that she has committed suicide after, even before the wedding, would have been raped by a kulak that employed her. Locals say the bride haunts the road near the forest, and the passers are advised to move quickly and try to simply overlook any sound or appearance, otherwise the bride will lead them in the heart of the forest, from where they won’t ever return.

Bulzești commune Villagers talk about the “creatures by the hill”. A long time ago, the village was moved because of the strigoi. According to a villager:“The evil spirits haunt us at both day and night. Nobody dares to go up the hill because of the vampires. A neighbour has paralyzed many years ago when he bumped into one of the evil spirits. He couldn’t find his peace and does bad things to all those around him” The Romanian poet Marin Sorescu, born in the commune, mentioned the legend in his poem “Dumneata”: One night, here, by the fountains,| Where homes are rare, due to the ghosts |Who they say have showed around |And the people were strained to put houses there, for the ghosts to have their place.(…)

Iași County

House of Gavril Buzatu on Manta Roșie – In this house from Iași lived Gavril Buzatu, “the last executioner of Moldova”. The house was the site of several killings and atrocities. It is reportedly haunted by strigoi about people think would be the thieves beheaded by Gavril Buzatu. During the night can be heard howls of beast or human, followed by roars of laughter. Here can be seen strange lights that “run” through the mansion, especially during the winter. A former tenant reported a black creature running through the nearby forest. Likewise, were seen flames lighting up suddenly in the abandoned salons.

Lungani Hill – It is said that the hill that separates the villages of Goești and Brăești is haunted by thousands of ghosts of soldiers from the World War I. Locals reported white lights, silhouettes of soldiers descending from the cemetery into the valley, at night, late after 12 o'clock. On the other side of the hill, in the commune of Lungani, peasants saw headless people who went on the road or even the devil in the body of child or cat.

Maramureș County

E58 near Cicârlău – The area is known by drivers as one where many accidents happen. The accidents are attributed to a ghost which is said that comes out from the crops and scares the drivers. In the 1930s, a young woman named Pălăguța, envied by women for her beauty, was accused of witchcraft and beaten to death. Old people speak about a kind of animal with very long legs which haunted the village in Tuesday nights. It is said that appeared after midnight and went to houses where women violated the church rule. Women would have been hit in the temple and died or remained paralyzed.

Prahova County

Iulia Hasdeu Castle in Câmpina – Bizarre by its architecture, Iulia Hasdeu Castle was built by writer Bogdan Petriceicu Hasdeu in the memory of Iulia Hasdeu, his daughter, who died at age 19. It is said that the castle was built in accordance with the indications received during some seances, from his dead daughter. Locals say that during the night, Iulia Hasdeu can be heard playing the piano, in father’s applause.

The Falcon and the Wolf Part 3

Summary:  This is an AU where you and Dean have been separated by a terrible curse for over two years.  You’re banding together with some old friends and old enemies to bring down the person responsible in hopes of removing the curse.  This is part three in a multi-part series.

If you missed Part 1 get caught up HERE.

If you missed Part 2 get caught up HERE.

Characters: AU!Dean x Reader, AU!Sam, AU!Cas, AU!Gadreel, AU!Arthur, AU!Cain, AU!John, AU!Crowley (mentioned), AU!Jess (mentioned), AU!Abbadon (mentioned), AU!Rowena, AU!Kevin, AU!Metatron (mentioned)

Word Count: 3495

Warnings: SMUT (unprotected sex, wrap it up people), canon typical angst, canon typical violence, death of an animal

A/N:  This is partly inspired by one of my favorite childhood movies Ladyhawke, though I’m taking it in a different direction.  This will be a multi-part series.  This is my first AU series, so feedback is very much appreciated!

Thanks to the fabulous beta @wheresthekillswitch, you are so wonderful! I don’t know what I’d do without you!

Thank you to the amazing @arryn-nyxx for the BEAUTIFUL aesthetic you created!  You capture a feeling with color, light and pictures that I can rarely find with words.

My tags are open so send me a message or an ask if you’d like to be added to the list!

Italics are flashbacks.

Castiel and Gadreel follow you on horseback riding north to find Sir Arthur Ketch.  Castiel’s freedom fighters are heading back to the compound with Sam and Dean.  Truthfully you could have made the journey on your own, but you’re reluctant to visit him alone.  No one has seen or heard from him in the years since the curse took hold.  Recently, word made it back that he was seen near a monastery far east of the Winchester stronghold.  As you soar through the sky your thoughts drift to your times with Arthur Ketch, or Ketch as you always called him.

Stinging pain hits your skin the moment the wooden sword makes contact with your leg.

“Sloppy, Y/N.  You can do better.”

Blowing your hair out of your face you stand with your sword ready again.

“Come at me, love.”

“Gladly,” you say darting toward him, swinging your sword.

Ketch twists out of the way, anticipating his move, you quickly sweep at his legs though he manages to jump away.  You bring your sword over your head; he meets it with his own, leaning into you.

“Getting better, love,” he says looking into your eyes.

“Just wait,” you say pushing away from him.

You circle each other feinting moves, trying to get a read on each other.

“Don’t hesitate, Y/N.  Move.  Action is best.”

You launch towards him again, successfully bluffing him, he goes left and you catch him across his side.

“Very good,” he rubs his side, a smirk playing on his lips.  “Again.”

Keep reading

3

“Father we come to Thy with this child. Sister Annabelle found her in the woods.” A nun proclaimed about the mysterious baby. She was found in a neatly packed basket with blankets folded around her to keep her warm.

“It seems that god wants this child to become part of our Monastery. That he has sent her our way to look after.” The Bishop stated and held the dear girl as she were one of his. Surely God gave her to them for a reason, a higher meaning he thought.

But who was the mysterious child? Where did she come from?

Religion in the world of Ranger’s Apprentice

In the world of Ranger’s Apprentice (and Brotherband), religion seems to hang in the background. Everyone knows it’s there, but religion is not a topic that is expressed on a constant basis unless it’s a cult or used in a curse. Despite this, however, there is often a gap between the ‘old’, or ancient, religions and the ‘new’, or monotheistic, religions.

Skandina

The Skandians are known as one of the most religious cultures in the RA series. The first instance we come into contact with their religion is when Erak, Will, and Evanlyn find out about the Vallasvow. The Vallas are the Skandian gods of vengeance, and are evoked in cases of murder or fraud. They can also be used in the way of an exclamation: “By the gods of the Vallas”. In conjunction with the Vallas, it is shown that the Skandians have other gods, like Loki and Gorlog, as well as possible Heroes, like Thaki and Loka. Connected to the gods is the Skandian heaven, although we’re never told its name. Ragnak is said to have been taken to the highest level of heaven due to having died in battle as a berserker, and it is feared that if a Skandian dies without a weapon in their hand their soul will wander for eternity.

The Skandians are also very superstitious, believing in forest spirits and ogres, and have many myths and legends that account for different environmental happenings, e.g. The Great Blue Whale and the tides.

Arrida

Arrida is an interesting country when it comes to religion. As far as the RA series goes, we only hear about their religion in terms of the Tualaghi or the desert. The Tualaghi are called the Forgotten of God, and Yusal admits that he doesn’t “pretend to know God’s will”. When it comes to the desert, they follow the Word of the Law, which states what one should do in the desert, such as leaving a man with water. This could be a parallel to Islam, but nothing is explicitly stated beyond this, so I am unwilling to state it outright.

More information is given in the Brotherband series. In Soccoro, a city on the north-western coast of Arrida, it is mentioned that the inhabitants worship three main gods: Hahmet (god of war), Jahmet (god of love), and Kaif (god of good harvests, fair weather, business success, and family matters). It is also stated that they have demigods, such as Ikbar. Later in the series, the Herons and Gilan come into contact with the Scorpion cult, who worship Imrika, the Scorpion goddess of death and destruction. It is said to have been based on a warped religious system, and it is possible that it is formed around the ‘old’, or ancient, religions.

Araluen

Araluen, like Arrida, is a complex mix of old and new religions. There are many instances of an Araluen using the phrase “God’s sake”, “my God” or other phrases with a capital ‘G’ in god. This seems to indicate a specific god, more than likely the one in Judeo-Christian beliefs. This is backed up by the statement by Cullum Gelderris in Sorcerer of the North about Orman: “Wears a black robe like a monk, although he is no man of the church”.  Like the use of a capital ‘G’, this indicates a connection to the Catholic Church, which was prevalent in 10th and 11th century Europe. In the same way, in Battle of Hackham Heath, it is pointed out that Woldon Abbey was a nursing order, not a religious one, meaning that there was some form of religious healing orders like the Catholic monasteries and nunneries.

The old religion is connected to the ancient beliefs of the country. Not only do many Araluens say “Thank the gods” or “May the gods bless you”, but a few of the old gods are mentioned by name. Such as Ergon, who is revealed to be an obscure Araluen god in Brotherband: Slaves of Soccoro, or the Black Troll of Balath in the Royal Ranger. Most – if not all – of the Araluen protagonists we know don’t follow these religions closely. This is why we can hear Halt curse someone with many gods and then later with only one God. Hibernia is no better, as an old lady in Mountshannon makes the distinction between the ‘old’ and the ‘new’ gods. It’s an underrepresented conflict, but it’s there.

I hope you guys got all of that! Thanks to @when-there-is-a-will for giving me such an interesting topic to talk about! Join in the conversation by either sending us an ask, or by reblogging this analysis and tagging it #raanalysis with your thoughts. Do you have questions or thoughts on future analysis’? Please send us an ask or submit it to us.

If you are interested in becoming a RA Analysis writer, let us know! We’d love to have you :)

May your coffee be hot and your arrows sharp!

To Practice Mindfulness Is to Return to Life

by Thich Nhat Hanh

To practice mindfulness is to become alive. Life is so precious, yet in our daily lives we are carried away by our forgetfulness, anger and worries. We are often lost in the past, unable to touch life in the present moment. When we are truly alive, everything we touch or do is a miracle. To practice mindfulness is to return to life in the present moment.

Practicing mindfulness, we see the suffering that is caused by the destruction of life everywhere, and we vow to cultivate compassion and use it as a source of energy to protect the lives of people, animals, plants and minerals. When we see suffering, compassion is born in us. It reflects the Buddha’s first sermon, that we have to be in touch with suffering.

It can be said that there are two kinds of suffering. Perhaps ninety-five percent of the suffering we endure every day is not at all necessary. Because of our lack of insight, we cause suffering to ourselves and others, including our beloved ones. But the remaining five percent is born out of contact with the real suffering around us and inside of us. To be aware of this kind of suffering brings about compassion, the energy necessary to transform ourselves and help relieve the suffering of the world.

Do not lose awareness of the suffering that is going on in the world. Nourish that kind of awareness by whatever means possible: images, direct contact, visits, and so on. We have to do that in order to keep both the awareness of the suffering and compassion alive in us. But experiencing too much suffering is not good. Any medicine must be taken in the proper dosage. We need to stay in touch with suffering only to the extent that we will not forget. Then compassion will flow within us and be a source of energy that we can transform into action.

People often use their anger at social injustice as a basis for action, but that is unwise. When you are angry you are not lucid, and you can do many harmful things. According to Buddhism, the only source of energy that can be useful is compassion, because it is safe. When you have compassion, your energy is born from insight. It is not blind energy. With compassion, we practice in order to learn ways to protect the lives of people, animals, plants, and minerals. Just feeling compassion is not enough. If we do not know how to help, we can do damage. That is why love must go together with understanding.

Call of repentance || Part I

Summary: reader is a member of the Golden Path. Under Amita’s command you have to sneak to the Royal Palace to kill Pagan Min. But when you’re about to fulfill your mission, you find youself unable to – under charm of king Min, you decide to switch the path and stand by the side of the Royal Army, becoming one of the leaders. 

Word Count:1540

Warnings: cursing

A/N: I’ve decided to separate that little story for two or three smaller parts. This is the first one. We don’t wanna make another fanfiction, taking we have two main larger fics at the moment. But I’ve been in Far Cry 4 fandom for a long time period, so it’s a really nice chance to me to come back to one of my favorite fandoms. I’ve wanted to create such story since very beginning, taking that Far Cry fandom was my very first one ever :) I still have a lot of sentiment toward all those characters, so I hope you all will enjoy my work.

Author: Rouge

Keep reading

The Path is Never Straight

Fandom: Overwatch
Characters: Genji Shimada and Tekhartha Zenyatta
Pairing: Genyatta
Rating:
Length: ~6,000 words, one shot
Warnings/Tags: Mental Breakdown/Dissociation, mentions of bodily dysphoria, otherwise mostly fluff and friendly banter. 

Summary: Genji Shimada follows the road to self-acceptance with the help of Zenyatta, his first year under the Shambali’s care already under his belt–but he still has much to learn. 

A/N: Haven’t seen anyone try to tackle Post!Overwatch Genji in this context, on the road to healing and self-acceptance but not quite there yet. I wanted to give it a try, so here it is–enjoy!


Genji notices it the moment he wakes up.

Keep reading

Interesting story...

A man is driving down the road and breaks down near a monastery. He goes to the monastery, knocks on the door, and says, “My car broke down. Do you think I could stay the night?”
The monks graciously accept him, feed him dinner, even fix his car. As the man tries to fall asleep, he hears a strange sound.
The next morning, he asks the monks what the sound was, but they say, “We can’t tell you. You’re not a monk.”
The man is disappointed but thanks them anyway and goes about his merry way.
Some years later, the same man breaks down in front of the same monastery.
The monks accept him, feed him, even fix his car. That night, he hears the same strange noise that he had heard years earlier.
The next morning, he asks what it is, but the monks reply, “We can’t tell you. You’re not a monk.”
The man says, “All right, all right. I’m *dying* to know. If the only way I can find out what that sound was is to become a monk, how do I become a monk?”
The monks reply, “You must travel the earth and tell us how many blades of grass there are and the exact number of sand pebbles. When you find these numbers, you will become a monk.”
The man sets about his task. Forty-five years later, he returns and knocks on the door of the monastery. He says, “I have traveled the earth and have found what you have asked for. There are 145,236,284,232 blades of grass and 231,281,219,999,129,382 sand pebbles on the earth.”
The monks reply, “Congratulations. You are now a monk. We shall now show you the way to the sound.”
The monks lead the man to a wooden door, where the head monk says, “The sound is right behind that door.”
The man reaches for the knob, but the door is locked. He says, “Real funny. May I have the key?”
The monks give him the key, and he opens the door.
Behind the wooden door is another door made of stone.
The man demands the key to the stone door.
The monks give him the key, and he opens it, only to find a door made of ruby.
He demands another key from the monks, who provide it.
Behind that door is another door, this one made of sapphire.
So it went until the man had gone through doors of emerald, silver, topaz, and amethyst.
Finally, the monks say, “This is the last key to the last door.”
The man is relieved to no end.
He unlocks the door, turns the knob, and behind that door he is amazed to find the source of that strange sound.
But I can’t tell you what it is because you’re not a monk

archiveofourown.org
The Sea Wolves - They Came With The Fog Archive of Our Own
An Archive of Our Own, a project of the Organization for Transformative Works
By Organization for Transformative Works

Warnings: Rape/Non-con, Graphic depictions of violence.


Summary: A Scottish girl is trying to avoid being noticed by the Vikings that came from the fogs of the sea to torment her village. But it seems the norns had woven her destiny in an unexpected way. Dedicated to all the mothers of Ivar’s Heathen Army who like this kind of story. It’s here @jevoislavieenrouge.

They came out of nowhere. Hidden in the fog of Alba. Like demons they destroyed the once peaceful village. The monastery was the first to be attacked. They took advantage that it was Sunday. Weapons were not allowed inside the house of God. Demons should not be allowed to enter God’s domain either. But the fact is that they did. Killing any man, woman or child that dared to defend themselves.



They were there for the gold and the gore. You were sure about that. In the middle of the chaos, you managed to hide behind a rock. You felt guilty that your family was left behind, they were slaughtered before your eyes. It had nothing you could do, you were powerless. The eyes of your parents saying a voiceless farewell. A silent blessing that you should go and save yourself.



You closed your eyes, trying to erase the memory of the slaughter. Your hands covering your ears to get rid of the cries from the victims, what prevented you to hear the footsteps of the giant monster that was approaching. Then you felt the heathen taking your arm and making you lay on your back against the cold ground.



His eyes were green as a forest, his body heavy against your small figure, you were trying to set free, fighting in vain. He was much stronger than you, your fight only making him angrier, until he punched you. The metallic taste of blood in your mouth, your head spinning from the impact. The man started ripping off your dress that was now soaked with the blood from your villagers. You were preparing for the worst. He would take your virginity. Something you were saving for an imaginary future husband that would never come.



His hands were rough and careless against your thighs, spreading your legs beneath him with the help of his knees. You closed your eyes to avoid looking at him. He was going to rape you, but you would not give him the pleasure of seeing you suffering, you would not let any noise come from your mouth. His scent was disgusting and the heavy breath was on your face, you could feel he was hard against your thighs while he was trying to expose himself to proceed with the assault. Then you heard a raspy voice coming from his back.



Minn