on cooking southern

washingtonpost.com
His Paula Deen takedown went viral. But this food scholar isn’t done yet.
Michael Twitty’s mission: To evangelize about the African roots of Southern food.

Wow this guy is amazing uhhhhhh uhhhhhh such awesome work

-blogger at Afroculinaria.com

“Twitty is deeply engrossed in both the African American and Jewish food traditions. “Blacks and Jews are the only peoples I know who use food to talk about their past while they eat it,” says Twitty, 38.”

“From Richmond it was a short jaunt to Colonial Williamsburg, where Twitty spent the week lecturing, conducting training sessions and cooking in period costume at three of the living history museum’s venues. In all his talks, Twitty emphasized the impact of chefs and cooks of African descent on shaping American and Southern cuisines in colonial times and after.”

“At a conference he met the scholar Robert Farris Thompson, author of “Flash of the Spirit,” a book about the influence of African religions on African American art that helped him see that “soul food” was, among other things, a spiritual term describing a mystical connection between humans and the animals and plants they eat.”

“He cooked and he gardened. He studied heirloom seed varieties, some that had been brought from Africa and some that had been carried from the New World to Africa and then, on slave ships, back to North America, among them okra, black-eyed peas, kidney and lima beans, Scotch bonnet peppers, peanuts, millet, sorghum, watermelon, yams and sesame. He called those seeds “the repositories of our history” and wrote about them in a monograph published by Landreth Seed in its 2009 catalogue.”

“Twitty’s embrace of all the various parts of himself — African, African American, European, black, white, gay, Jewish — sometimes raises hackles, as does his habit of speaking his mind. An article he wrote in the Guardian on July 4, 2015, suggesting that American barbecue “is as African as it is Native American and European, though enslaved Africans have largely been erased” from its story, elicited scorn and worse: Many commenters were outraged by his idea of barbecue as cultural appropriation.”

New Orleans: a neighbourhood guide

From the pretty French Quarter to the hip Marigny district, each of New Orleans’ neighbourhoods jive to their own funky beat – learn all about them with our in-the-know guide.


FRENCH QUARTER  

The charming, walkable Quarter is full of step-back in-time architecture and venerable dining institutions that speak to its status as New Orleans’ oldest neighbourhood, but it’s also home to exciting, new foodie spots…


Eat

Photo by CC-By-SA-3.0 on Wiki Commons 

For more than a hundred years, Galatoire’s has been serving trout meuniere (trout with a flour-based sauce), soufflé potatoes and champagne to the New Orleans elite in its mirrored, tiled dining room. The French 75 bar at Arnaud’s, has an eccentric museum of vintage Mardi Gras costumes hidden upstairs.


Stay

Built in 1886, the Hotel Monteleone breathes old New Orleans character, from its elegant Beaux Arts architecture to its many reported ghost sightings.


Do

Preservation Hall faithfully presents traditional jazz each night, just like when it was launched in 1961, with musicians who were there when the genre was born in the early twentieth century. Expect intimate, late-night concerts with contemporary artists like Elvis Costello and Angelique Kidjo.



BYWATER/MARIGNY

Just downriver of the French Quarter, the bohemian Marigny and Bywater neighborhoods have become a centre for hip, laid-back art, music and cuisine.


Eat

Photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans on Wiki Commons

Grab a bottle at tiny, jewel-like wine shop Bacchanal, then drink it in the expansive, magically lit garden where live bands provide the soundtrack. In New Orleans, there are gigs 365 nights of the year meaning your toes will always be kept tapping.  A block from the Press Street train tracks in Bywater, the aptly named Junction features Louisana’s finest craft brews and gourmet burgers.


Stay

The cute Balcony Guest House oozes Creole charm with its pretty characterful rooms. Its eponymous balcony provides a wonderful vantage point to admire the area’s rainbow-coloured tiny ‘shotgun’ houses, and see Marigny’s creative types ambling through the streets.


Do

Photo by Robbie Mendelson on Wiki Commons

At Euclid Records and the Louisiana Music Factory, stock up on sounds to remember your visit to the cradle of American music. Crescent Park runs for two miles on the edge of Marigny and Bywater, and has breathtaking river vistas, as well as running and biking paths.



WAREHOUSE DISTRICT/CBD

A few blocks uptown of the French Quarter, this neighbourhood is packed with galleries, plus stylish hotels and restaurants.


Eat

The latest from celeb chef John Besh’s team is Willa Jean, an expansive, corner space specializing in delectable bakery items, and brunch accompanied by lemony frozen rosé. Grab a seat on the raw bar at the award-winning Peche, for the best seafood in the Gulf.  In 2016, New Orleans had the most James Beard award nominees per capita over any American city, so come hungry.


Stay

The old Roosevelt Hotel epitomises grandeur, with a Guerlain spa and its historic Blue Room, where Louis Armstrong once performed.


Do

Photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans on Wiki Commons

Stop by the Ogden Museum and browse its collection of contemporary and classic Southern art. On Thursday nights, local musicians play in its soaring atrium. The National World War Two Museum houses an extraordinary multimedia collection dedicated to telling the story of the conflict that shaped the twentieth century.



UPTOWN AND THE GARDEN DISTRICT

Live oaks and magnolias provide lush natural canopies over some of the city’s most impressive architecture


Eat

Photo by Pexels on Pixabay

The relatively new Freret Street cultural district is home to a handful of laid-back, innovative bars and restaurants, from the home-style Southern cooking at High Hat Café to next-level cocktails at Cure. Hidden away on a residential street, Clancy’s where generations have enjoyed fried oysters with Brie and lemon icebox pie.  


Stay

The Avenue Plaza Resort, is home to locals’ favourite Mr. John’s Steakhouse which serves up prime beef just steps away from oak-lined St. Charles Avenue, where streetcars rumble by.


Do

Tipitina’s, founded in the 1970s to give rhythm-and-blues piano man Professor Longhair a place to play, brings in both major touring bands and local luminaries. Magazine Street offers brilliant shopping for miles, including handcrafted jewellery inspired by the history of South Louisiana at Mignon Faget’s 

Book flights to New Orleans with British Airways


Written by Alison Fensterstock

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Tiana - The Princess and the Frog Beignets

“You know what I feel like? A mother effin beer.” -Tiana

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

  • 3 White bread Slices
  • Powered Sugar
  • 1 Jar of Honey (Optional)

HOW TO MAKE IT

  1. Form slices into balls
  2. Bake in oven at *350 for 10 minutes or until browned
  3. Cover in Powdered Sugar
  4. Pour entire jar of Honey generously over Beignets (Optional)

Follow for more magical Disney Recipes!

Requested by @shootingmidnight 

For years, John T. Edge has been telling the story of Southern food – its central role in Southern identity and what it owes to the African-American and immigrant cooks who have historically been left out of the standard narratives the South tells about itself.

In his new book, The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South, Edge attempts to pay down what he calls “a debt of pleasure to those farmers and cooks who came before me, many of whom have been lost to history.”

Race, Class And Paying Down Southern Food’s Great ‘Debt Of Pleasure’

Image: Shelby Knowles/NPR

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Cultural Appropriation is a real, important, and harmful thing, but god damn if it’s not one of the most recklessly abused terms in the social justice lexicon.

Transcription under the cut for accessibility

Keep reading

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This Is The Earliest Known Reference To “Gumbo” And Is Found In The Interrogation Records Of A Slave,  New Orleans, September 1764

GUMBO- The Creole Cookery Book, published by the Christian Woman’s Exchange of New Orleans in 1885, calls gumbo making an “occult science” that “should be allowed its proper place in the gastronomical world.”

A dish that originated in southern Louisiana from the Louisiana Creole people during the 18th century. It typically consists primarily of a strongly flavored stock, okra, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and seasoning vegetables, which can include celery, bell peppers and onions.

According to one suggestion, gumbo is a reinterpretation of traditional African cooking. West Africans used the vegetable okra as a base for many dishes, including soups, often pairing okra with meat and shrimp, with salt and pepper as seasonings. In Louisiana, the dish was modified to include ingredients introduced by other cultural groups. Surviving records indicate that by 1764, African slaves in New Orleans mixed cooked okra with rice to make a meal.  

A more familiar version of the dish was described in an 1879 cookbook by Marion Cabell Tyree. Her Housekeeping in Old Virginia described “Gumbo Filit A La Creole”, a filé-based gumbo with chicken and oysters and spiced with allspice, cloves, red and black pepper, parsley, and thyme. The 1881 cookbook What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, dictated by former slave Abby Fisher, contained three gumbo recipes. “Oyster Gumbo Soup” used a filé base, while “Ochra Gumbo” and “Chicken Gumbo” used okra as a base. Four years later, the cookbook La Cuisine Creole documented eight varieties of gumbo. None used sausage, but almost all of them contained ham.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gumbo#/media/File:Gumbo-1764.JPG

.https://www.yahoo.com/food/the-history-of-gumbo-82790044364.html

i’m just thinking about taako and angus making ice cream and mags is just…eagerly waiting to try some, waiting for it to churn and begging them to use some magic to make it freeze faster (which for obvs reasons taako is adamantly against) and finally after hours of waiting taako scoops him a bowl and like before taako can even scoop angus one mags has already scarfed it down and waiting for more and angus gets a kick out of it so taako lets it slide..but he does it again so taako flings a scoop at his face and anyway this is how they find out that magnus is allergic to milk as he breaks out in a rash immediately 

Edible Arrangements

(Hilly knows a couple things as a tadpole. He knows there’s probably a lax bro hitting on him, and that Bitty’s super-secret boyfriend may or may not be a middle-age lumberjack sugar daddy.)


Hilly knows a few things about Samwell’s hockey dynamics. He knows he is a tadpole; he initially expects to be hazed to the ground and forced to eat dog food or something like his roommate, who is currently rushing a frat. He expects the Haus to be dirty and filled to the brim with red cups and sticky floorboards. He also knows not to hang out with the lax team because Ransom and Holster said so, even though a cute boy who he thinks is from the lax team winked at him in his Intro to Anthropology class. He knows that NHL’s very own Jack Zimmermann, son of ‘Bad Bob’ Zimmermann and legendary hockey extraordinaire, is a Samwell alumni, and had slept in the very room which Chowder, their goalie, currently inhabits.  

But Hazeapalooza turns out to be nothing as bad as he expects (he even gets homemade pie out of it, even if Holster gives him the side-eye). And the Haus is cleaner than a sports frat house should be. The hockey team is nice (and surprisingly socially aware) and Hilly likes Samwell fair enough, but he misses home sometimes.

But Bitty makes things better. Hilly likes Bitty a lot. He likes hanging around the Haus and watching Bitty roll pastry dough with a practiced, methodical hand because it reminds him of how his mom used to bake cookies for him and his sister. Bitty doesn’t mind too much (he thinks) that Hilly may want to go on a date with a lax bro. Bitty bakes him peach cobbler with crumbles toasted a golden brown and talks about his family’s jam recipes. Bitty is open and warm and welcoming. However, the one thing Bitty doesn’t talk much about is his boyfriend.

Keep reading

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Two different ways to prepare coca de recapte, a traditional Catalan dish consisting of a salted flat bread and “escalivada” (smoky grilled bell peppers, onions, eggplant and sometimes other veggetables).

Recipes for a Southern Sunday 

After re-watching Forks Over Knives recently, I was reminded of how good I had been eating the past five years and how poorly I’ve been eating the past few months. You can even see it in my last few articles. Never would I have promoted so much sugar, oil, and processed food when I first started Cheap Vegan back in 2012.

I’m purposefully documenting it on here because I want people to see that even someone who has been vegan for 12 years and eating a Whole Foods Plant-Based diet for 5 years, is still very capable of slipping into the convenience of processed food, sugar, and caffeine. They taste good and are literally addictive, but even though it takes more work, in the long run it feels even better to make the right choices for our bodies.

So this Sunday I did what I always advise others to do: I went to the farmers market when it was closing down, bought $1 produce from someone trying to get rid of their excess, and I made a delicious meal out of my findings, big enough that I would have left overs for at least part of the week.

4-5 servings only cost me about

<$1 – Rice (from a giant bag)
$1 – Bunch of Collard Greens from Farmers Market
$.75 – onion
<$1 – garlic cloves
<$1 – Veggie Bouillon
<$.50 – 2 Celery Stalks
$1 – Green Pepper
$2 – 2 cans of beans
~$1.75 – 8 Sweet Potatoes (Trader Joes)

TOTALLING OUT TO APPROX: $10!!! That’s only about $2 a meal! And here’s how you make your own Southern Sunday:

RICE
-1.5 cups of brown rice

Put 1 part rice to 2 parts water in rice cooker and turn on.
(You may want to add a little extra water because brown rice is a little more dense)

GREENS
-½ onion
-3 cloves garlic
-1 Vegetable Bouillon cube or Vegetable Broth (adjust to taste)
- about 12 leaves of Collard Greens

1. Dice the onions very fine and chop the garlic very thick.
2. Wash and remove stems of collard greens, then cut into 1″x1″ squares.
3. Sautee the onions and garlic at a low heat until clear.
4. Add a little less than an inch of water with the cube of bouillon or just broth.
5. Once this is simmering, add collards to your rich oniony broth. Make sure you like this flavor because this is how your collards will taste. Adjust accordingly.
6. Mix collards in with broth for about 1 minute then remove from heat. You don’t want to over-cook the greens and you definitely don’t want to boil them.

BEANS
-½ onion
-2 stalks celery
-¼ bouillon cube (to taste)
-½ cup of green pepper (I actually used green poblano pepper for this one)
-2 cans of red or pinto beans

1. Dice the onions, celery, and peppers very fine and sautee at a low heat until onions are clear. 
2. Add beans and bouillon cube until everything is evenly mixed together.
3. (optional) Transfer to oven for a more robust flavor and smooth texture. Add small amount of water and cover if beans become too dry for your liking. 

SWEET POTATOES
-Sweet Potatoes

1. Wash and cut sweet potatoes into 1″ thick pieces.
2. Oil pan to prevent sticking and place in the oven at 350degrees.
3. Add small amount of water and cover with foil if sweet potatoes become too dry.

Viola! You have a soulful meal ready to eat and re-heat for the rest of the work week! Best part is, all of these dishes can be mixed and matched to eat in different ways throughout the week. Rice can be used for a stir fry. Beans can be used for Mexican. Sweet Potatoes can be mashed. Or Collards can be eaten with whole wheat pasta!

If you wanna see how I did it, check out my snap story below!

So being the Food Network addict that I am, I occasionally find myself watching Trisha Yearwood. And right now, the episode I’m watching features her going and getting a skating lesson from the Hockey Team.

So obviously, my brain goes “ZIMBITS AU”, which is only further resolved after Trisha says the following things:

- As you can imagine, growing up in Georgia, I didn’t skate a lot

- (to her friend who’s doing this misadventure with her) I think, as long as we look cute, it doesn’t really matter how good we are

So Bitty has a Food Network show with a vague “southern cooking in new england” theme, and the producers really like to play up the Georgian Fish out of Water angle with the not-actually-cooking segments of the show. So Bitty’s scheduled to do a private skating lesson with Marty and Tater, because the combo of warm and friendly but understated mentor Marty and loud gregarious and enthusiastic rookie (to the NHL - he has a few years in the Russian pros under his belt) Tater will make great television.

So Bitty is making both of them their own thank-you food. Bitty has fun experimenting with Russian pastries for Tater, and of course finds a way to incorporate maple into his apple pie for Marty.

The producers are expecting a lot of hilarious and endeering wobbling on the ice. And they get a lot of great footage of Bitty reacting to wearing hockey gear for the first time “I look like a big blue marshmallow, y'all”, but nobody remembers until Bitty’s on the ice that he was a Junior Regionals Figure Skating Champion.

He glides effortlessly onto the ice, has some fun learning how to handle a hockey stick (cue some ridiculous and just the right amount of off color for basic cable jokes about stick handling)

And of course, Jack Zimmermann, who works harder than god but kind of sucks at acting like a human being in front of cameras, is at the rink to get in some extra practice, and Tater is like “Zimboni! You come and race the tiny baker man!”

And Marty winks at Bitty, who gets the message and starts wobbling and skating like he’s never seen ice in his LIFE, and Jack looks warily at the cameras, but George has been on him to do more public relations stuff and he may as well make a “race” against this tv person part of his warmup.

And Bitty’s all “now, I ain’t no professional skater, Mr. Zimmermann, so you’d better go easy on me!” And then proceeds to SMOKE Jack the second Marty calls GO.

Marty and Tater are doubled over laughing, and the camera guy is circling Jack to get all angles of his utterly dumbfounded expression.

Bitty’s smirking, with his hands on his hips, then says, “do y'all think I could pull off a salchow in all this gear?” And proceeds to pull off a jump in hockey skates and all the gear. Tater, of course insists that Bitty teach him and the footage they get from it is pure gold.

So anyway. After they get off the ice, Bitty cuts up his maple apple pie and Jack decides he might actually be in love.