oldbutgold

Dorothy Dandridge disliked doing nightclub acts. She hated wearing revealing clothing, as the eyes of promiscuous men strolled over her body. But Dandridge knew that obtaining a substantial movie role immediately was impossible and she had bills to pay. So to add polish to her skills, Dandridge contacted Phil Moore, an arranger she worked with during her Cotton Club days. With Phil's help, Dandridge was reborn as a sultry, sexy performer that dazzled audiences. They took her act throughout the United States and were mostly well received. However, in places like Las Vegas, the racism was just as bad as in the Deep South. Being black meant that she could not use the same bathroom, hotel lobby, elevator, or swimming pool as white patrons or fellow actors. Dandridge was "forbidden" to speak to the audience. And despite being the headliner at many of the clubs, Dandridge's dressing room was usually a janitor's closet or a dingy storage room. Critics raved about Dorothy Dandridge's nightclub performances. She opened at the famed Mocambo Club in Hollywood, a favorite meeting place for many movie stars. Dandridge was booked for shows in New York and became the first African American to stay in and perform at the elaborate Waldorf Astoria. She moved into the Empire Room of the famed hotel for a seven week engagement. Her club performances gave Dandridge much needed publicity to get film work in Hollywood. The bit parts began to flow in but to get back on the big screen, Dandridge had to compromise her standards, agreeing in 1950 to play a jungle queen in Tarzan's Peril. The tension between making a living and defending her ethnicity would shape the rest of her career.

Dorothy Dandridge disliked doing nightclub acts. She hated wearing revealing clothing, as the eyes of promiscuous men strolled over her body. But Dandridge knew that obtaining a substantial movie role immediately was impossible and she had bills to pay. So to add polish to her skills, Dandridge contacted Phil Moore, an arranger she worked with during her Cotton Club days. With Phil’s help, Dandridge was reborn as a sultry, sexy performer that dazzled audiences. They took her act throughout the United States and were mostly well received. However, in places like Las Vegas, the racism was just as bad as in the Deep South. Being black meant that she could not use the same bathroom, hotel lobby, elevator, or swimming pool as white patrons or fellow actors. Dandridge was “forbidden” to speak to the audience. And despite being the headliner at many of the clubs, Dandridge’s dressing room was usually a janitor’s closet or a dingy storage room. Critics raved about Dorothy Dandridge’s nightclub performances. She opened at the famed Mocambo Club in Hollywood, a favorite meeting place for many movie stars. Dandridge was booked for shows in New York and became the first African American to stay in and perform at the elaborate Waldorf Astoria. She moved into the Empire Room of the famed hotel for a seven week engagement. Her club performances gave Dandridge much needed publicity to get film work in Hollywood. The bit parts began to flow in but to get back on the big screen, Dandridge had to compromise her standards, agreeing in 1950 to play a jungle queen in Tarzan’s Peril. The tension between making a living and defending her ethnicity would shape the rest of her career.

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Dorothy Dandridge disliked doing nightclub acts. She hated wearing revealing clothing, as the eyes of promiscuous men strolled over her body. But Dandridge knew that obtaining a substantial movie role immediately was impossible and she had bills to pay. So to add polish to her skills, Dandridge contacted Phil Moore, an arranger she worked with during her Cotton Club days.

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