I want to write you letters and take pictures of you with a polaroid.
I want to walk with you to your door after a night of holding your hand.
I want to spend our evenings reading books by a fire and candles.
I want to invite you over for a meal out of my grandma’s cookbook.
I want to escape to a place where the simplest things mean the most.
—  & I want to go with you
She was both an old soul and a free spirit. It was hard to understand her, but oh lord did you want to try.
—  Excerpt of a book I’ll never write #166
12 Reasons Why Old Souls Have Such A Hard Time Finding Love

1. They have a strong sense of identity.

They know who they are, which means they also know – specifically – what they do and do not want in a partner, what works and what doesn’t. While this is fantastic in terms of being able to choose wisely, it ultimately diminishes their pool of prospects pretty significantly.

2. Left unchecked, their hyper-intuitiveness can wreck relationships.

Often prone to overthinking because of how deeply sensitive they are, their capacity to worry and make assumptions can break relationships that don’t have a perfectly strong foundation.

3. Many are in the throes of twin flame relationships.

They’re attached or are with people who are not their “forever” people, rather, intense connections they’re meant to learn, and rapidly expand, from.

4. They often have a greater purpose that must be attended to first – one that love would distract them from.

They usually have to accomplish quite a bit on their own before they find love – this is because old souls love deeply, and completely. To be given love too soon would keep them from the other important things they are here to do.

5. They will not settle for anything less than soulmate love.

They require a lot more than just a surface-level, “average” relationship. They absolutely will not settle, and sometimes, that means biting the bullet and being alone for longer than what’s “average” as well.

6. While many people can bring them passion, few can bring compatibility.

Because they feel so deeply and others find them so fascinating, it’s easy for them to find infatuation, but to be with someone who is truly their best friend, deepest confidant *and* lover is a challenge.

7. They’re less inclined to go out and meet people in modern ways.

Even if they have nothing against online dating, it doesn’t always come naturally for them, nor does finding a random hookup at a bar or being set up blindly seem appealing.

8. They’re natural healers, and often attract people who need help, not love.

And that attraction is reciprocated. There’s almost nothing that feels better to an old soul than being able to help someone who truly needs it. However, at some point in time, it’s crucial for them to realize that they have to choose a partner, not a student, or a charity case.

9. They dislike the “game.”

Dating is inherently exhausting to an older-spirited person. Feigning disinterest for the sake of looking “cool” or knowing which faux pas other people find off-putting (how long after the first date do you text again?) isn’t instinctive to them, and can stress them out more than they ever find it “fun.”

10. Their standards are sky-high.

They expect a lot from themselves, so likewise, they expect a lot from their partners. While this is a great thing, it’s another quality that has to be kept in check: it’s more important to be able to accept the qualities that aren’t deal-breakers than it is to just write a person off because they’re imperfect.

11. They have baggage.

People who developed their inner selves quickly did so for a reason: they had to cope, they had to grow, or they had to learn from some challenging experiences that life set up for them. While this is a great thing on its own, unresolved issues can often re-manifest in close relationships.

12. They feel fear as intensely as they feel love.

The degree to which they love something is proportionate to how much they fear losing it, or not being “good enough” for it. They don’t just love intensely, they feel everything else intensely, too, and sometimes, that gets in the way of the really good things in front of them.

Can we please abandon the glorification/use of “Old Soul” as a character trait for young people??

• Ok as someone who has been called an “old soul” repeatedly since childhood, just hear me out. Being quiet/introspective/introverted/wisdom-seeking is great! BUT!
• It’s really important to participate in the realities of your generation, especially in tumultuous times like these, and to do that, connecting with people your age is truly vital.
YOUNG PEOPLE ARE AMAZING. Honestly once a kid talked to me non-stop for 45 minutes about a specific type of dragon he did a report on, young souls are full of fantastic creatures and magic and grass-stains and exclamation points.
• The aforementioned “old soul” traits don’t place you on a different level of intellect/understanding than anyone else, and to assume that they do limits your ability to learn from others, especially “young souls” who are deemed silly or naive.
• You will have plenty of time to be an “old soul” when you are old. Let yourself be young, let yourself grow and listen and make mistakes and grow some more.
In conclusion, this isn’t an attack on the term itself, or the traits it encompasses, but the idea that being an “old soul” sets you above and apart from others your age. Just never assume that you can ever stop learning and listening and re-opening your eyes even after you thought you were wide awake, ok? Even when your body and soul are 120 years old.