old growth redwoods

6

Join #mypubliclandsroadtrip Today at Headwaters Forest Reserve in California

Spectacular in its beauty, the Headwaters Forest Reserve is also a vital ally in conservation efforts to protect the most iconic forest species in the Pacific Northwest. Located 6 miles southeast of Eureka, California, these 7,542 acres of public lands feature magnificent stands of old-growth redwood trees that provide nesting habitat for the marbled murrelet (a small Pacific seabird) and the northern spotted owl. Both species are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, as are the coho salmon, chinook salmon, and steelhead trout that have important habitat in the reserve’s stream systems.

Joining forces, the federal government and the State of California acquired the land for the reserve in 1999 to protect these important resources. The historic value of a once busy mill town named Falk is also commemorated in interpretive signs along the Elk River Trail, which follows an old logging road to the now vanished community. The BLM partners with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to manage the Headwaters Forest Reserve as part of the National Conservation Lands.

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

These are coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California. The park is home to the largest continuous block of old-growth redwood forest left on the planet- with some 10,000 acres.

The alluvial flats along its creeks and rivers are prime redwood habitats. The mix of rich soils, water, and fog rolling in from the ocean have produced the planet’s tallest forest. Of the 180 known redwoods greater than 350 feet, more than 130 grow here.

Coastal redwoods can be up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 26 feet (7.9 m) in diameter at breast height.

Research now shows that the older such trees get, the more wood they put on- nice to see even trees go through a midlife spread.

-Jean

Photograph by Michael Nichols, National Geographic

These are coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California. The park is home to the largest continuous block of old-growth redwood forest left on the planet- with some 10,000 acres.

The alluvial flats along its creeks and rivers are prime redwood habitats. The mix of rich soils, water, and fog rolling in from the ocean have produced the planet’s tallest forest. Of the 180 known redwoods greater than 350 feet, more than 130 grow here.

Coastal redwoods can be up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 26 feet (7.9 m) in diameter at breast height.

Research now shows that the older such trees get, the more wood they put on- nice to see even trees go through a midlife spread!

-Jean
http://wonderful-earth-story.tumblr.com

Photograph by Michael Nichols, National Geographic

The heavy fog, combined with the wet and misty ferns and monolithic old-growth redwoods… this was basically the rainforest from King Kong. I was half expecting to see giant claw marks on the trees hundreds of feet up.

Trillium Falls, Redwood National Park
California
November 23, 2015

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#TravelTuesday with Guest Photographer Bob Wick to California’s Humboldt Coast!

A five hour drive north of San Francisco, California’s fog-shrouded Humboldt Coast is a land apart from the traffic and bustle of California’s urban centers. There are year-round photography opportunities here ranging from crashing winter storm waves to brilliant spring wildflowers; from towering redwoods to rushing mountain streams. The weather can be fickle so be prepared to adjust your photography for conditions.  Here are three of my favorite places that can all be fit into one multi-day trip.  

The King Range National Conservation Area is the largest patch of wilderness coastline on the west coast.  4,000 foot peaks rise majestically from the surf and almost 100 miles of hiking trails beckon to day hikers and backpackers.  One of my favorite spring hikes is to the historic Punta Gorda Lighthouse.  Fields of poppies and lupine peak here in May and last till early June.  Photo tip: Bring a long telephoto lens and hike a bit further south to capture a rare colony of Stellar sea lions on the offshore rocks. For a good wildlife shot, always focus on the eyes to make sure they are sharp. Don’t be afraid to shoot many exposures to increase your opportunity to capture interesting behaviors.

An hour to the north, the Headwaters Forest Reserve encompasses the last large tract of old-growth redwoods to be placed under public protection.  A level hiking trail along Elk River allows you to view restoration work and second-growth redwood along a moss shrouded stream corridor.  If you are more adventurous, take the 9 mile round-trip trail to enjoy a taste of primeval old growth redwood. Photo tip: Photography at Headwaters is best on grey foggy or rainy days when soft light and wet vegetation brings out the emerald green colors of the vegetation. Find a point of interest to make your photo stand out. It might be a path winding through the trees, or a trillium blooming among the ferns.  Also, consider having a person in the photo to lend scale to the massive trees.  

Your trip won’t be complete until you head twenty miles further up the coast is the picturesque village of Trinidad. Its coastline is framed by offshore rocks and islands that make up a particularly majestic slice of the California Coastal National Monument.  The area is a wildlife viewer and photographer’s dream. Birds such as black oystercatchers ply the shoreline rocks while seals and sea lions haul out just offshore.  On the larger rocks, further offshore, thousands of marine birds nest in spring and summer. Photo tip: Time your photography at low tide along rocky coastlines like those in Trinidad and tide-pool life on the rocks will add interest to the foreground.  Make sure to wipe your camera and lenses down after seacoast photography to remove salt residue.

Check out our @esri California Humboldt Coast multimedia storymap-journal for more stunning photos, videos, helpful links and maps of the area: mypubliclands.tumblr.com/traveltuesdaycahumboldtcoast.

The Woods Are Lovely

on AO3 here

Pairing: Sam x Reader
Words: 4150
Summary: Sam has a job as a wilderness guide during his summers off at Stanford, and you have the great luck to be spending five days in the woods with him when he leads you and a few friends on a camping trip.
Warnings: Smut, outdoor sex
A/N: This ended up getting longer than I expected; there’s quite a bit of build up before the smut, but I was enjoying writing adorable Stanford era wilderness guide!Sam. I might end up writing a couple more parts to this, we’ll see. Tagging @spnfanficpond. Title from “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost.

(x)

Keep reading

In this Sunday’s episode, “The Lost Worlds of Planet Earth,” COSMOS speaks for the trees. 

During March of 2013 we shot scenes in an old-growth Northern California redwood forest. The forest is on private land and we were only the second film crew to ever be allowed to shoot there. We had to walk on designated pathways to avoid damaging plants and the roots of older trees.

In this photo, Ann reviews her script with Neil in that forest, our second day of principle photography.

-Sarah Mozal, Assistant to EPs Ann Druyan and Mitchell Cannold

My Golden St-Fat Tuesday night picture for tonight…it’s not a good one.

“This May 21, 2013 photo provided by the National Park Service shows wildlife biologist Terry Hines standing next to a massive scar on an old growth redwood tree in the Redwood National and State Parks near Klamath, Calif., where poachers have cut off a burl to sell for decorative wood. The park recently took the unusual step of closing at night a 10-mile road through a section of the park to deter thieves. Photo: Laura Denny, AP”