old growth redwoods

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Join #mypubliclandsroadtrip Today at Headwaters Forest Reserve in California

Spectacular in its beauty, the Headwaters Forest Reserve is also a vital ally in conservation efforts to protect the most iconic forest species in the Pacific Northwest. Located 6 miles southeast of Eureka, California, these 7,542 acres of public lands feature magnificent stands of old-growth redwood trees that provide nesting habitat for the marbled murrelet (a small Pacific seabird) and the northern spotted owl. Both species are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, as are the coho salmon, chinook salmon, and steelhead trout that have important habitat in the reserve’s stream systems.

Joining forces, the federal government and the State of California acquired the land for the reserve in 1999 to protect these important resources. The historic value of a once busy mill town named Falk is also commemorated in interpretive signs along the Elk River Trail, which follows an old logging road to the now vanished community. The BLM partners with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to manage the Headwaters Forest Reserve as part of the National Conservation Lands.

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

These are coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California. The park is home to the largest continuous block of old-growth redwood forest left on the planet- with some 10,000 acres.

The alluvial flats along its creeks and rivers are prime redwood habitats. The mix of rich soils, water, and fog rolling in from the ocean have produced the planet’s tallest forest. Of the 180 known redwoods greater than 350 feet, more than 130 grow here.

Coastal redwoods can be up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 26 feet (7.9 m) in diameter at breast height.

Research now shows that the older such trees get, the more wood they put on- nice to see even trees go through a midlife spread.

-Jean

Photograph by Michael Nichols, National Geographic

The last of my old growth redwood supply went into this seventh order from the same buyer.  He’s having them made for his friends’ fiftieth birthdays.  What a guy!  Handcrafted in my Alaskan coastal workshop. 

The heavy fog, combined with the wet and misty ferns and monolithic old-growth redwoods… this was basically the rainforest from King Kong. I was half expecting to see giant claw marks on the trees hundreds of feet up.

Trillium Falls, Redwood National Park
California
November 23, 2015

These are coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California. The park is home to the largest continuous block of old-growth redwood forest left on the planet- with some 10,000 acres.

The alluvial flats along its creeks and rivers are prime redwood habitats. The mix of rich soils, water, and fog rolling in from the ocean have produced the planet’s tallest forest. Of the 180 known redwoods greater than 350 feet, more than 130 grow here.

Coastal redwoods can be up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 26 feet (7.9 m) in diameter at breast height.

Research now shows that the older such trees get, the more wood they put on- nice to see even trees go through a midlife spread!

-Jean
http://wonderful-earth-story.tumblr.com

Photograph by Michael Nichols, National Geographic

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Ginger has hardened redwood inlay matched to the yellow cedar/old growth redwood body, loaded with Buddha strat pickups and Sigler American made CTS controls; now up on Reverb.

The Mother Tree

This conversation happened after I yammered on for ages about the Mother Tree and redwoods to a particularly observant friend.

Me: So do you want to see pictures of it?

Friend (with complete earnestness): Oh yes! I love to see pictures of other people’s god symbols!

Luckily I rarely blush due to emotions, or I’m sure my whole face and neck would’ve been dark red.

Shooting some Tri-x in the dense coastal redwood forest of Praire Creek State Park in California. The forest floor gets minimal light, which allows ferns to grow abundantly, however offers poor lighting for photos. I found this patch of light through a gap in the old growth redwoods and took advantage of the fading daylight. My girlfriend was attempting to catch raindrops in her mouth but kept taking them to the face. This was shot on my Mamiya 7 II and pushed 2 stops. It was the only truly sharp portrait I got.