old fashioned interior design

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 37:

Neuschwanstein Castle, Bavaria.

Built in the 19th century for Ludwig II of Bavaria. 

Intended as a private refuge for the king, it was built in a romantic style in homage to Wagner. 

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 5:

Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire, England. 

Built by Thomas Paine, Robert Adam and Matthew Brettingham in 1759.

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No. 76:

Michelmersh Court, Hampshire, England. 

Built in the late 18th century. 

It was the home of the broadcaster David Frost and was recently for sale.  

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 2:

Chatsworth House, Derbyshire, England. 

Built 1687-1707, with some remnants of the original 1560s house. 

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 23:

Aston Hall, Birmingham, England. 

Built in the Jacobean period between 1618 and 1635, by John Thorpe. 

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No. 34:

Le Petit Trianon, Versailles, France. 

Built 1762-68 by Ange-Jacques Gabriel on the grounds of Versailles for Madame de Pompadour, the longtime mistress of Louis XV. 

It was later used by Marie Antoinette as a place to retire from court life. 

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 27:

Chateau de Chenonceau, Loire, France. 

Built in 1514-22 by renowned architect Philibert de l'Orme. 

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This stunning desk, now in the Rijksmuseum, was made by Abraham Roentgen from c1758-60. 

It was commissioned by Johann Philipp von Walderdorff, the Archibishop and Elector of Trier. His portrait is featured on the very top of the desk (visible in one of the details). 

Click on the details, the marquetry is simply outstanding. 

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 9:

Carton House, Kildare, Ireland. 

Built by Richard Cassels in 1739. 

(last 3 photos by me)

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 19:

Calke Abbey, Derbyshire, England. 

Built 1701 to 1704. 

Photos mainly National Trust. 

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No. 58:

Dumfries House, Ayrshire, Scotland. 

The Prince of Wales spearheaded a campaign to purchase it for the nation.

The house dates from the 1750s. It is particularly significant because of the large amounts of original Thomas Chippendale furniture, specifically designed for the house, that remains in situ.