old civilization

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. reacts in St. Augustine, Fla., after learning that the senate passed the civil rights bill, June 19, 1964.

mlk and civil rights protests in cartoons: then, as now

in the 1960s, america would have been all to happy to extend civil rights to blacks if only they  weren’t all just a bunch of lawless looters and rioters.

good thing we’ve grown as a society since then!

in the 1960s, america would have gladly listened to civil rights leaders – if only they weren’t all just stoking so much darn violence all the time!

good thing mlk’s image has been rehabilitated and black leaders are taken seriously now!

in the 1960s, the value of human life was placed above that of inert property - if only those uppity blacks would just take our word for it

thankfully the value of black life is recognized today!

in the 1960s, america really wanted to give black protestors the benefit of the doubt – if only they weren’t just so darn complicit in their own oppression

thank god those antiquated views are all behind us now!

in the 1960s, jobs, education and housing were ripe for the picking for minorities – they just insisted on wasting all that energy on aimless protests instead!

thank heavens we actually listen to their grievances now instead of just telling them to sit down and shut up!

in conclusion, everything would be fine if they had just stayed in the back of the bus instead of getting out and rocking it

(huge thanks to Rebel Blob for digging all these old cartoons up!)

abcnews.go.com
New Orleans takes down white supremacist monument
A monument to a deadly white-supremacist uprising in 1874 was removed under cover of darkness by workers in masks and bulletproof vests Monday as New Orleans joined the movement to take down symbols of the Confederacy and the Jim Crow South. The Liberty Place monument, a 35-foot granite...
By ABC News

How the fuck did this thing stay up until 2017?

Robert Bonner, a 63-year-old Civil War re-enactor, was there to protest the monument’s removal.

“I think it’s a terrible thing,” he said. “When you start removing the history of the city, you start losing money. You start losing where you came from and where you’ve been.”

2

This Is The Earliest Known Reference To “Gumbo” And Is Found In The Interrogation Records Of A Slave,  New Orleans, September 1764

GUMBO- The Creole Cookery Book, published by the Christian Woman’s Exchange of New Orleans in 1885, calls gumbo making an “occult science” that “should be allowed its proper place in the gastronomical world.”

A dish that originated in southern Louisiana from the Louisiana Creole people during the 18th century. It typically consists primarily of a strongly flavored stock, okra, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and seasoning vegetables, which can include celery, bell peppers and onions.

According to one suggestion, gumbo is a reinterpretation of traditional African cooking. West Africans used the vegetable okra as a base for many dishes, including soups, often pairing okra with meat and shrimp, with salt and pepper as seasonings. In Louisiana, the dish was modified to include ingredients introduced by other cultural groups. Surviving records indicate that by 1764, African slaves in New Orleans mixed cooked okra with rice to make a meal.  

A more familiar version of the dish was described in an 1879 cookbook by Marion Cabell Tyree. Her Housekeeping in Old Virginia described “Gumbo Filit A La Creole”, a filé-based gumbo with chicken and oysters and spiced with allspice, cloves, red and black pepper, parsley, and thyme. The 1881 cookbook What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, dictated by former slave Abby Fisher, contained three gumbo recipes. “Oyster Gumbo Soup” used a filé base, while “Ochra Gumbo” and “Chicken Gumbo” used okra as a base. Four years later, the cookbook La Cuisine Creole documented eight varieties of gumbo. None used sausage, but almost all of them contained ham.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gumbo#/media/File:Gumbo-1764.JPG

.https://www.yahoo.com/food/the-history-of-gumbo-82790044364.html

Henery Ossian Flipper:

- Born into slavery, Henery was appointed into the ‘United States Military Academy’ in West Point, NY (1873)

- After a few years of harassment, isolation/insults. To become the first African American graduate, and the first African American Commissioned Officer in the US Army.