oil transfer

Dakota Access pipeline vandalism highlights sabotage risks

BISMARCK, N.D. — The developer of the Dakota Access pipeline has reported “recent co-ordinated physical attacks” on the much-protested line, just as it’s almost ready to carry oil.

Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners didn’t give details, but experts say Dakota Access and the rest of the nearly 3 million miles of pipeline that deliver natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. are vulnerableb to acts of sabotage.

It’s a threat that ETP takes seriously enough that it has asked a court to shield details such as spill response plans and features of the four-state pipeline that the company fears could be used against it by activists or terrorists.

Here is a look at some pipeline security issues:

___

RECENT ATTACKS

Authorities in South Dakota and Iowa confirmed Tuesday that someone apparently used a torch to burn a hole through empty sections of the pipeline at aboveground shut-off valve sites.

Mahaska County Sheriff Russell Van Renterghem said the culprit in Iowa appeared to have gotten under a fence around the facility, but Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputy Chad Brown said the site in South Dakota wasn’t fenced.

The Iowa incident was discovered March 13 and the South Dakota incident Friday.

Pipeline operators are asked to report security breaches to the National Response Center. Data on the centre ’s website show no reports from ETP this month.

The $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline runs 1,200 miles through the Dakotas, Iowa and Illinois.

___

HOW DO YOU ATTACK A PIPELINE?

Because pipelines mainly run underground, aboveground shut-off valves are natural targets, according to Jay O'Hara, a spokesman for the environmental group Climate Direct Action. That group targeted valves on pipelines in October in North Dakota, Minnesota, Montana and Washington state, though the pipeline companies said activists didn’t succeed because none of the sites were operating when the attacks happened.

Explosive, firearms and heavy machinery also have been used to try to sabotage pipelines.

Securing pipelines is difficult because they often travel long distances through remote and even uninhabited territory, said Kerry Sundberg, a professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta, who studies energy infrastructure security and environmental crime.

___

THE DANGER

Sundberg said “it’s stupid and dangerous” to tamper with pipeline shut-off valves.

Modern oil pipelines are “incredibly sophisticated” systems that move huge volumes of petrochemicals at high pressures, he said. Simply closing a valve can cause the pressure upstream to increase quickly, creating a significant risk of a spill that endangers the environment and anyone in the area where the pipe suddenly bursts, he said.

In response to the October incidents, federal regulators issued a bulletin warning that tampering with pipeline valves “can have significant consequences such as death, injury, and economic and environmental harm.”

Sundberg also said that it’s ironic for people who say they’re concerned about the environment to take an action that could cause an environmental disaster.

But O'Hara said: “The hypocrisy really lies in the pipeline corporations who say their pipelines are safe, say leaks don’t happen. They blame activists who are trying to stop global cataclysm by taking action to point out what they do every day, which is leak and spill.”

Someone who targets a pipeline facility in the U.S. could face up to 20 years in prison.

___

WHO’S RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RECENT ATTACKS?

No suspects have been identified in either state and no group has claimed responsibility

O'Hara told The Associated Press that Climate Direct Action wasn’t involved in any actions against the Dakota Access pipeline.

Attorneys for the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes, which are leading the legal battle against the pipeline, said the tribes don’t condone acts of violence against pipeline property.

___

HOW FREQUENTLY DOES PIPELINE SABOTAGE OCCUR?

Not very often, Sundberg said. It happens more frequently in Canada than the U.S. It’s generally committed by people trying to make an environmental point. It would be “very scary” if terrorist groups tried it in North America, he said.

Some of the worst incidents in the U.S. were on the Trans Alaska Pipeline. Vandals blew up a section in 1978, spilling about 16,000 barrels of oil near Fairbanks. In 2001, a drunken man fired a hunting rifle into the pipeline near Livengood, causing more than 6,000 barrels to spray out.

Some of the most notable incidents in Canada happened in the 1990s and 2000s in Alberta and British Columbia. A series of bombings in 2008-09 targeted pipelines in British Columbia. Weibo Ludwig, an Alberta man who crusaded against the extraction of “sour gas” containing high amounts of hydrogen sulfide, was convicted in several of the 1990s acts of vandalism. He was arrested but never charged in the later attacks.

Pipeline sabotage happens with some regularity in war zones. Iraqi insurgents, Colombian rebels and Mexican guerrillas all have claimed responsibility for pipeline attacks in recent decades.

___

Karnowski reported from Minneapolis. Associated Press news researcher Jennifer Farrar contributed to this story from New York, and reporter David Pitt contributed from Des Moines, Iowa.

___

Follow Blake Nicholson on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/NicholsonBlake. Follow Steve Karnowski at: https://twitter.com/skarnowski.

Blake Nicholson And Steve Karnowski, The Associated Press

Correction: Oil Pipeline story

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) – In a story March 22 about protecting pipelines from sabotage, The Associated Press misidentified a professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta, as Kerry Sundberg. His name is Kelly Sundberg.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Dakota Access pipeline vandalism highlights sabotage risks

The developer of the Dakota Access pipeline has reported “recent coordinated physical attacks” on the much-protested line, just as it’s almost ready to carry oil

By BLAKE NICHOLSON and STEVE KARNOWSKI

Associated Press

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) – The developer of the Dakota Access pipeline has reported “recent coordinated physical attacks” on the much-protested line, just as it’s almost ready to carry oil.

Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners didn’t give details, but experts say Dakota Access and the rest of the nearly 3 million miles of pipeline that deliver natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. are vulnerable to acts of sabotage.

It’s a threat that ETP takes seriously enough that it has asked a court to shield details such as spill response plans and features of the four-state pipeline that the company fears could be used against it by activists or terrorists.

Here is a look at some pipeline security issues:

___

RECENT ATTACKS

Authorities in South Dakota and Iowa confirmed Tuesday that someone apparently used a torch to burn a hole through empty sections of the pipeline at aboveground shut-off valve sites.

Mahaska County Sheriff Russell Van Renterghem said the culprit in Iowa appeared to have gotten under a fence around the facility, but Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputy Chad Brown said the site in South Dakota wasn’t fenced.

The Iowa incident was discovered March 13 and the South Dakota incident Friday.

Pipeline operators are asked to report security breaches to the National Response Center. Data on the center’s website show no reports from ETP this month.

The $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline runs 1,200 miles through the Dakotas, Iowa and Illinois.

___

HOW DO YOU ATTACK A PIPELINE?

Because pipelines mainly run underground, aboveground shut-off valves are natural targets, according to Jay O'Hara, a spokesman for the environmental group Climate Direct Action. That group targeted valves on pipelines in October in North Dakota, Minnesota, Montana and Washington state, though the pipeline companies said activists didn’t succeed because none of the sites were operating when the attacks happened.

Explosives, firearms and heavy machinery also have been used to try to sabotage pipelines.

Securing pipelines is difficult because they often travel long distances through remote and even uninhabited territory, said Kelly Sundberg, a professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta, who studies energy infrastructure security and environmental crime.

___

THE DANGER

Sundberg said “it’s stupid and dangerous” to tamper with pipeline shut-off valves.

Modern oil pipelines are “incredibly sophisticated” systems that move huge volumes of petrochemicals at high pressures, he said. Simply closing a valve can cause the pressure upstream to increase quickly, creating a significant risk of a spill that endangers the environment and anyone in the area where the pipe suddenly bursts, he said.

In response to the October incidents, federal regulators issued a bulletin warning that tampering with pipeline valves “can have significant consequences such as death, injury, and economic and environmental harm.”

Sundberg also said that it’s ironic for people who say they’re concerned about the environment to take an action that could cause an environmental disaster.

But O'Hara said: “The hypocrisy really lies in the pipeline corporations who say their pipelines are safe, say leaks don’t happen. They blame activists who are trying to stop global cataclysm by taking action to point out what they do every day, which is leak and spill.”

Someone who targets a pipeline facility in the U.S. could face up to 20 years in prison.

___

WHO’S RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RECENT ATTACKS?

No suspects have been identified in either state and no group has claimed responsibility

O'Hara told The Associated Press that Climate Direct Action wasn’t involved in any actions against the Dakota Access pipeline.

Attorneys for the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes, which are leading the legal battle against the pipeline, said the tribes don’t condone acts of violence against pipeline property.

___

HOW FREQUENTLY DOES PIPELINE SABOTAGE OCCUR?

Not very often, Sundberg said. It happens more frequently in Canada than the U.S. It’s generally committed by people trying to make an environmental point. It would be “very scary” if terrorist groups tried it in North America, he said.

Some of the worst incidents in the U.S. were on the Trans Alaska Pipeline. Vandals blew up a section in 1978, spilling about 16,000 barrels of oil near Fairbanks. In 2001, a drunken man fired a hunting rifle into the pipeline near Livengood, causing more than 6,000 barrels to spray out.

Some of the most notable incidents in Canada happened in the 1990s and 2000s in Alberta and British Columbia. A series of bombings in 2008-09 targeted pipelines in British Columbia. Weibo Ludwig, an Alberta man who crusaded against the extraction of “sour gas” containing high amounts of hydrogen sulfide, was convicted in several of the 1990s acts of vandalism. He was arrested but never charged in the later attacks.

Pipeline sabotage happens with some regularity in war zones. Iraqi insurgents, Colombian rebels and Mexican guerrillas all have claimed responsibility for pipeline attacks in recent decades.

___

Karnowski reported from Minneapolis. Associated Press news researcher Jennifer Farrar contributed to this story from New York, and reporter David Pitt contributed from Des Moines, Iowa.

___

Follow Blake Nicholson on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/NicholsonBlake. Follow Steve Karnowski at: https://twitter.com/skarnowski.

Wet n wild photofocus foundation
Beige bronze / medium tan
Good: photographs well, easy to blend, not overly dewy, spatula
Bad: promotes oil production, feels heavy, transfers, builds up on glasses, uses a lot of product to build up to full coverage

It doesn’t feel heavy at first application, but since it makes my skin produce oil, it feels heavy as the day goes by. I like the spatula because I can control the amount that I use. Honestly, anything is better than pouring it out.

I dont recommend this and I wont be using it unless I know I will be photographed. It is a pretty good color match and it oxides the tiniest bit.

The Sunni-Shia Debacle

Iran and Russia have propped up the Alawite- led government of President Assad and gradually increased their support. Tehran is believed to be spending billions of dollars a year to bolster Mr Assad, providing military advisers and subsidised weapons, as well as lines of credit and oil transfers. Russia has meanwhile launched an air campaign against Mr Assad’s opponents.The Syrian government has also enjoyed the support of Lebanon’s Shia Islamist Hezbollah movement, whose fighters have provided important battlefield support since 2013. The Sunni-dominated opposition has, meanwhile, attracted varying degrees of support from its international backers - Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Jordan, along with the US, and EU states.

It seems that the West and the East are responsible for propping up Islamists. I personally am against the propping of both sides because I think that Islam is pathetic. However, I personally think that Assad is more moderate than ISIS which is why I don’t care what Russia does in Syria given that there are Russians putting themselves in the line of fire to fight the Muslims. That’s something I actually have to respect despite not being loyal to Russia.

Nigerian court overturns seizure of oilfield from Shell and Eni

(Adds Eni and Shell (LSE: RDSB.L - news) comments)

By Camillus Eboh

ABUJA, March 17 (Reuters) - A Nigerian court on Friday overturned a request by Nigeria’s financial crimes agency to seize an oilfield from Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: 0LN9.L - news) and Eni (Euronext: ENI.NX - news) .

In January, a court had ordered the seizure of the OPL 245 oil block and transfer of operations to the federal government on the request of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC).

Oil companies Shell and Eni (LSE: 0N9S.L - news) had filed motions to dispute this.

The EFCC is investigating whether the $1.3 billion purchase of OPL 245 in 2011 involved “acts of conspiracy, bribery, official corruption and money laundering”, according to court papers seen in January by Reuters.

“The chairman of the EFCC failed to meet the precondition for making an application for interim attachment of properties. So the application as such was irregular and the order granted on its basis ought to be discharged,” Justice John Tsoho of the Federal High Court said.

“Eni reaffirms the correctness of its conduct within the acquisition of the license,” Eni spokesman Roberto Carlo Albini said following the ruling.

Shell Nigeria Exploration and Production Company (SNEPCO) said it welcomed the judgment.

“As the case itself, relating to the 2011 settlement of the associated long-standing disputes of the offshore block, is the subject of ongoing investigations, it would be inappropriate to comment further,” a SNEPCO spokesman added.

Shell had previously said the EFCC conducted “a gross abuse of process and an abuse of power” to get a court order asking for the forfeiture, according to a document obtained by Reuters.

The Nigerian court case is the latest of several inquiries, following those by Dutch and Italian authorities, into the purchase of OPL 245, which could hold up to 9.23 billion barrels of oil, according to industry figures.

The oilfield’s licence was initially awarded in 1998 by former Nigerian oil minister Dan Etete to Malabu Oil and Gas, a company in which he held shares.

The licence was then sold for $1.3 billion in 2011 to Eni and Shell. A British court document has shown that Malabu received $1.09 billion from the sale, while the rest went to the Nigerian government. (Additional reporting by Alexis Akwagyiram in Lagos and Libby George in London; writing by Ulf Laessing; editing by Jason Neely/Dale Hudson/Alexander Smith)

Nigerian court overturns seizure of oilfield from Shell and ENI

ABUJA, March 17 (Reuters) - A Nigerian court on Friday overturned a request by Nigeria’s financial crimes agency to seize an oilfield from oil majors Shell (LSE: RDSB.L - news) and ENI (Euronext: ENI.NX - news) .

In January a court had ordered the seizure of the OPL 245 oil block and transfer of operations to the federal government on the request of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC).

Shell and ENI (LSE: 0N9S.L - news) had filed motions to dispute this. (Reporting by Camilus Eboh; writing by Ulf Laessing; editing by Jason Neely)

Nigerian court overturns seizure of oilfield from Shell and ENI

ABUJA, March 17 (Reuters) - A Nigerian court on Friday overturned a request by Nigeria’s financial crimes agency to seize an oilfield from oil majors Shell (LSE: RDSB.L - news) and ENI (Euronext: ENI.NX - news) .

In January a court had ordered the seizure of the OPL 245 oil block and transfer of operations to the federal government on the request of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC).

Shell and ENI (LSE: 0N9S.L - news) had filed motions to dispute this. (Reporting by Camilus Eboh; writing by Ulf Laessing; editing by Jason Neely)

3

Oil paint on top of image transfer on wood 2


Having discovered that applying linseed oil onto the image transfer really worked in bringing out the colour of the original image, here I started by applying this mixture first to highlight the areas I wanted to stand out against the ashier areas.


Once I had done this I applied bright yellow and orange oil paint in thin layers to include saturated colours.

10

Oil paint over image transfer on wood 1


I found that my work wasn’t developing as I would have liked. Instead of continuing to experiment and create transfers on wood I decided to start painting over my transfers, taking inspiration from Jules de Balincourt and Peter Doig’s use of saturated colours.


Initially, it was hard to start painting on top of my transfers as I wasn’t quite sure what and how to actually paint. In the end I decided to focus on my use of saturated colours and how this contrasted with the black and white of the transferred image.


While I was painting on the wood I realised that the solution I was mixing my paint with - turpentine and linseed stand oil - when applied to the transferred image really brought out the colour of the image that had previously appeared ashy and not very clear.

Captain Oil Remediation My marine pollution class took a trip to learn about how oil spills are prevented and cleaned up. This lovely number is the suit used to go into “hot zones” or areas where there are oil spills. This prevents oil from getting on clothes and skin and prevents transfer of oil into clean areas.

It also makes a great fashion statement. A great winter outfit, the suit is insulated to keep in the warmth and the full body suit keeps you dry when it snows or rains. The hard hat even keeps your head safe from hail!

Shell and Eni Slapped with Corruption Charges in Nigeria

Oil giants Royal Dutch Shell RDS.A and Eni SpA E recently faced criminal charges from Nigeria’s anti-graft agency over the $1.1 billion acquisition of Africa’s richest oil blocs in 2011.

The court filing alleges that the companies paid a bribe of $801 million to the former Oil Minister of Nigeria, Dan Etete and his allies for the purchase of Oil Prospecting License (OPL) 245. The government received only $210 million from the deal. The Nigerian Court has seized the oilfield assets from the companies and ordered the transfer of oil blocs to the government.

The Inside Story

OPL 245 is considered to be one of the richest oil blocs in Nigeria comprising over nine billion barrels of crude oil. Former Nigerian President, Goodluck Jonathan had handed over OPL 245 to Malabu Oil, a company with questionable credentials secretly established by Dan Etete. Since Malabu Oil was thought to be a fraudulent company, Etete decided to cash in on the bloc.

Through various middlemen, Shell and Eni were asked to purchase the bloc. Due to Etete’s scandalous records, former Justice Minister Adoke became the mediator for the transaction.

The companies denied of being involved in the crime and claimed that the money was paid into the Nigerian government account. Various investigations however, reveal that the companies were guilty. Several senior executives of both the companies have faced a trial over these corruption allegations.

About Royal Dutch Shell

Headquartered in Netherlands, Shell is one of the largest integrated energy companies, engaged in the production, refining, distribution and marketing of oil and natural gas. The company carries a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy).

Shell has outperformed the Zacks categorized Oil & Gas-International integrated industry over the prior three months. During the aforesaid period, the company’s shares fell 0.5% while the broader industry declined around 1.5%.

About Eni SpA

Based in Rome, Italy, Eni’s major business segments are Exploration and Production (E&P), Gas and Power, and Refining and Marketing. The company presently carries a Zacks Rank #2.

Over the last three months, shares of Eni rallied 5.5% compared to the 1% drop witnessed by the Zacks categorized Oil & Gas International Integrated industry.

Other Stocks to Consider

Other favorably placed stocks in the broader industry include Semgroup Corporation SEMG and Crescent Point Energy Corporation CPG. Both the companies sport a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy). You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank stocks here.

Semgroup posted average positive earnings surprise of 79.10% in the last four quarters.

Crescent Point reported a positive earnings surprise in each of the trailing four quarters, the average being 127.16%.

Zacks’ Top 10 Stocks for 2017

In addition to the stocks discussed above, would you like to know about our 10 finest tickers for the entirety of 2017? Who wouldn’t? These 10 are painstakingly hand-picked from 4,400 companies covered by the Zacks Rank. They are our primary picks to buy and hold. Be among the very first to see them >>


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Petrobras, Total ink US$2.2 billion deals

BRASILIA: Brazil’s national oil company, Petrobras, closed a deal on Tuesday to sell US$2.225 billion worth of assets to French giant Total as part of its continuing diversification plan. According to a Petrobras statement, the deal is part of a broad alliance to work on upstream and downstream. It sees Petrobras transfer to Total 22.5 percent of concession rights to the Iara exploration area, including the Sururu, Berbigao and Oeste de Atapu oil fields. It also transfers 35 percent of the Lapa field concession area, which began production in December. Petrobras is not exiting the two fields fully as it shall retain a majority interest of 42.5 percent in Iara and 10 percent in Lapa. Finally, Petrobras has sold to Total a 50 percent stage in Termobahia, a power generation company with two thermal plants in the northeastern state of Bahia. The beleaguered Brazilian oil company is facing a major need to cut costs as it faces crippling debt and a loss of market confidence after a corruption ring was found within its ranks. In 2016, Petrobras announced a divestment plan, which included raising US$19.5 billion through the offloading of assets in 2017 and 2018.–BERNAMA

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Blog Post 6:

This week I really felt some of my ideas come to life because I finally got some work done on final pieces and made some progress on my concept. I’m combining two things that I really love: photography and embroidery. For some pieces, I plan to use spoonfly.com, where I can get my photos printed onto a fabric that I can embroider. So far all I’ve ordered is a test piece of one of my photos, so they’ll send me a small version of what the coloring will look like and it only costs $5. I thought that would be the smart thing to do just incase, instead of spending $30 and hating the way it turned out on the fabric. Unfortunately, it takes a week for them to come in unless you want to spend an extra $40 for fast shipping 🙄Therefore, it’s iffy whether it will show up in time for our critique Friday, but i at least have my wintergreen oil photo transfer that I’ve started to embroider on.

Extremely rough version of using wintergreen oil to photo transfer onto canvas paper. I couldn’t quite remember how we did it in foundations, but as I did it, I started to remember a little better. It’s a little weird doing it on canvas paper because of the texture so I’m not sure yet if it will be successful.