oh to be on the receiving end of that look

5
I received this gem in my ‘ask’ box from my old friend, Anonymous: “The X-Men are about diversity and multiculturalism and the fight against oppression.  The inhumans aren’t shit.  The Inhumans will never replace the x-Men no matter how hard you try and force it down peoples throats.  So just give it up already”

Oh-kayyy.  Look, this is just a fan site and I don’t have any sway over Marvel Comics and the decisions they chose to make.  I love the X-Men.  I always have and always will.  Sure, the mutants are getting the short end of the stick lately and it’s true that Inhuman has sought to emulate a lot of the metaphorical valance that has been key to The X-Men.  Nonetheless, the issues of diversity, multiculturalism, and the fight against oppression are surely big enough and important enough to be addressed in both the X-titles as well as the Inhuman books.  So just cool yer jets…

Since you’ve got me feeling a touch ornery, however, lets just take a moment to look at the casts that comprise the X-books and the Inhuman books (pictured above).  Which one was it again that represents diversity and multiculturalism? 

anonymous asked:

hi i want to ask when did jeongguk say "The best hyung that comforted me when I was lonely, sad, and had to be careful of my actions because I was the maknae was Jimin.” ?? thanks

oh it’s from sstp - here!! and while we’re at it LOOK AT THE FLUFF ;A; they had slightly matching outfits too and that cute side hug ughhh 

Story Time...

So I teach 3rd grade right? Well today, during Social Studies, we were learning about patriotism, flags, national anthems, etc. Some of my students have never heard the Star Spangled Banner, so I decided I would pull up a youtube video of someone singing it (I happened to choose Beyonce’s rendition during the 2013 inauguration). That was over and then I decided I better have them listen to Canada’s anthem, Oh Canada, because well….we share a border. I pulled up a youtube video of Oh Canada being sung in Ottawa during a Sens games. We listened, blah blah blah. At the very end when the video was done, the only question received about either anthem was, “Why does that one flag have a pot leaf on it?” As a teacher, who teaches EIGHT AND NINE YEAR OLD CHILDREN I was kind of surprised he even knoooooows what a pot leaf looks like. Long story short, we had a little lesson on the difference between a maple leaf and a pot leaf at school today……. 

its-magical asked:

.. i am deeply sorry to tell u this but... seems like ikea no longer sells the "Blåhaj" shark plushies

Oh no :C

Hmmmm….

Oh no! Though Shanghai is probably nice……

Yesssss…. I’ll have to look around :>

no thank YOU! I notice you have poured your heart into this ♥♥♥♥

sleuthara:

Ara winced, index fingers rising to her temples, “She was messaging me at three in the morning… I guess she forgot,” the detective made quotation marks with her fingers in the air, emphasizing that it was obvious that her niece had not forgotten the time difference, “that I was supposed to be sleeping.”

The woman paused, looking up at the other in what could have been shame, but quickly turned into amusement. “I told her to kick the boy in the crotch because I was annoyed…” A laugh slipped past her lips. “She got detention.”

     “Oh, is that so?” he snorted, albeit he wasn’t that all surprised. Judging by the other’s actions he could tell that she was just as annoyed as he was. “And here I thought I was special—” Woobin was also on the receiving end of Jenny’s late night / early morning text messages. Clearly the brat paid no attention to the time zone differences when she felt the need to consulting them on boy problems. He made a mental note to keep his cell phone on silent if he ever slept like a normal human-being, just in case she decided to do this again.

     Woobin couldn’t suppress his amusement after hearing what Ara had suggested to her out of annoyance. A highly entertained laughter escaped his lips while the rest of him cringed from the idea of being kicked in the balls. He could empathize with the poor kid who had the unfortunate displeasure of being romantically interested in the brat. Yet, at the same time, the advice Jenny received from her aunt was just… priceless, for lack of better words.

     As soon as his laughter died out, he turned to her with a serious expression. “She actually took your advice?” he rhetorically asked. “It’s no wonder why she’s so… well, you.”

hideaki-anno asked:

4, 23, 24, 32

04: what are you listening to?- I’m watching ‘happy endings’ rn on Netflix actually :p
23: how have you felt today? - I’ve been too very emotional, i mean I’m not sad or anything just woman moodiness. Yknow..
24: you receive £60 without any reason, what do you spend it on? - I… Probably food tbh… I wanna go on a date :p
32: what are you looking forward to in the next month? - OH!! I’m moving barns to one in pitt meadows and I’m so very excited. End of this month and I’ll be heading down! New couch is Olympic level dressage coach !!!

(asterismcs)

     Sitting on the floor, between two rows of bookshelves, Teddy continued to read his book until he felt a lingering presence at the end of the aisle. Without bothering to glance up from his book, Teddy spoke, rather irritably.
     ”How many times do I have to tell you? I’ll check out when I’m ready.” When he didn’t receive an immediate response back, he shifted his head to look at the person. “Oh… you’re not the librarian.”

How to Respond to Common Vegan Questions

In meeting someone the other day I got a comment that many vegans may have heard from time to time: “Oh you’re vegan? But you look so healthy!” I was amused of course and ended up having a good time divulging things about myself and learning about this other person as well.

If you’ve been a vegan long enough, chances are that you’ve found that the social implications of veganism can be just as complicated and frustrating as figuring out what you can eat on a day-to-day basis. The list of common questions that I have received includes things like:

1. What do you eat? Isn’t being vegan hard?
2. Where do you get your protein?
3. Is blank vegan?
4. Would you eat meat if you were stranded on a desert island?
5. Isn’t eating meat natural?

In response, I would say that:

1. I eat a lot of things, including fruits, vegetables, grains, and nuts. I eat chocolate and snacks and junk food from time to time and I am not wasting away or deficient in nutrients. Switching to a vegan diet can be difficult at first but it really doesn’t have to be.

2. I get my protein from eating grains, beans, tofu, nuts, and meat substitutes. The Vegan Resource Group has a great list of common vegan protein sources as does the Vegan Coach. The recommendation for protein calls for 1 to 1.2 grams per kilogram of body weight, so the average American female (160 pounds/72 kilograms) only needs 72-87 grams of protein and the average male (195 pounds/88 kg) needs 88-106 grams. You really do not need to eat as much protein as our meat-centric culture may lead you to think; there’s quite a bit of protein in raw fruits and vegetables as well!

3. I would recommend Is It Vegan, an app to help you eliminate animal products from your diet, as well as PETA’s list of accidentally vegan foods. With time it will be easy to recognize words on ingredient lists to find if something is vegan or not, though more and more products are making it easier by including vegetarian and vegan trademarks on their products.

4. Personally, I don’t think it’s useful to think about these hypothetical situations when the likelihood of this happening is close to zero and when an easy, harm-reducing lifestyle is available to me where I am currently.

5. Just because something is “natural” doesn’t mean that it is the right or correct thing to do. There are a lot of culturally and historically “normal” activities that we as humans have participated in, but that doesn’t mean that we should continue them. Humans are omnivores but we can survive and thrive successfully on a completely plant based diet.

I’ve found answering these questions to be annoying in the past, but now I’ve adopted the attitude that curiosity and interest is a good thing, so I’m open to answering whatever questions may come by me to help others understand me and to clear up any misconceptions they may have. Vegans have been stereotyped as weak, frail, pretentious, annoying, and arrogant amongst other things, though I would argue that these qualities do not apply to the majority of vegans that I know. I think it’s very natural for people to make assumptions about things they do not understand, and as popular as veganism has become, there still lies an inherent mystique about it. Veganism can seem like a lifestyle that only celebrities, hippies, and health conscious yuppies adopt, but that isn’t true. There isn’t and shouldn’t be a limiting textbook vegan mold. It’s this type of belief that causes people to think that the conversion to a vegan diet means the death of their social lives as they spend their days eating rabbit food in the confines of their homes or something along those lines. The thing is, you don’t need to drink wheatgrass smoothies and detox once a week. You don’t have to do anything that you don’t feel comfortable and happy with, which is something that applies not only to adopting a vegan lifestyle but also to life in general.

Eating is very much a social activity and people who deviate from the norm are going to attract curiosity and questions. Veganism really isn’t something that should hinder your social life though; it can be an important component of your identity, but it’s not the only thing that will define you as a person. If people are curious about this aspect of your life it’s because they are also curious about you and want to be able to relate and connect, which are desires common to everyone.

Instead of letting this part of yourself become a burden, use it as a way to form more connection with the people around you. Go with your friends to vegan/vegan-friendly restaurants and see what new foods you can experience. Cook with people to explore diverse cuisines; go to vegan clubs and organizations to meet new friends — there are so many doors that you can open if you just try.

from The Huffington Post | The Full Feed http://ift.tt/1DJeHMs via latest news
latest news

How to Respond to Common Vegan Questions

In meeting someone the other day I got a comment that many vegans may have heard from time to time: “Oh you’re vegan? But you look so healthy!” I was amused of course and ended up having a good time divulging things about myself and learning about this other person as well.

If you’ve been a vegan long enough, chances are that you’ve found that the social implications of veganism can be just as complicated and frustrating as figuring out what you can eat on a day-to-day basis. The list of common questions that I have received includes things like:

1. What do you eat? Isn’t being vegan hard?
2. Where do you get your protein?
3. Is blank vegan?
4. Would you eat meat if you were stranded on a desert island?
5. Isn’t eating meat natural?

In response, I would say that:

1. I eat a lot of things, including fruits, vegetables, grains, and nuts. I eat chocolate and snacks and junk food from time to time and I am not wasting away or deficient in nutrients. Switching to a vegan diet can be difficult at first but it really doesn’t have to be.

2. I get my protein from eating grains, beans, tofu, nuts, and meat substitutes. The Vegan Resource Group has a great list of common vegan protein sources as does the Vegan Coach. The recommendation for protein calls for 1 to 1.2 grams per kilogram of body weight, so the average American female (160 pounds/72 kilograms) only needs 72-87 grams of protein and the average male (195 pounds/88 kg) needs 88-106 grams. You really do not need to eat as much protein as our meat-centric culture may lead you to think; there’s quite a bit of protein in raw fruits and vegetables as well!

3. I would recommend Is It Vegan, an app to help you eliminate animal products from your diet, as well as PETA’s list of accidentally vegan foods. With time it will be easy to recognize words on ingredient lists to find if something is vegan or not, though more and more products are making it easier by including vegetarian and vegan trademarks on their products.

4. Personally, I don’t think it’s useful to think about these hypothetical situations when the likelihood of this happening is close to zero and when an easy, harm-reducing lifestyle is available to me where I am currently.

5. Just because something is “natural” doesn’t mean that it is the right or correct thing to do. There are a lot of culturally and historically “normal” activities that we as humans have participated in, but that doesn’t mean that we should continue them. Humans are omnivores but we can survive and thrive successfully on a completely plant based diet.

I’ve found answering these questions to be annoying in the past, but now I’ve adopted the attitude that curiosity and interest is a good thing, so I’m open to answering whatever questions may come by me to help others understand me and to clear up any misconceptions they may have. Vegans have been stereotyped as weak, frail, pretentious, annoying, and arrogant amongst other things, though I would argue that these qualities do not apply to the majority of vegans that I know. I think it’s very natural for people to make assumptions about things they do not understand, and as popular as veganism has become, there still lies an inherent mystique about it. Veganism can seem like a lifestyle that only celebrities, hippies, and health conscious yuppies adopt, but that isn’t true. There isn’t and shouldn’t be a limiting textbook vegan mold. It’s this type of belief that causes people to think that the conversion to a vegan diet means the death of their social lives as they spend their days eating rabbit food in the confines of their homes or something along those lines. The thing is, you don’t need to drink wheatgrass smoothies and detox once a week. You don’t have to do anything that you don’t feel comfortable and happy with, which is something that applies not only to adopting a vegan lifestyle but also to life in general.

Eating is very much a social activity and people who deviate from the norm are going to attract curiosity and questions. Veganism really isn’t something that should hinder your social life though; it can be an important component of your identity, but it’s not the only thing that will define you as a person. If people are curious about this aspect of your life it’s because they are also curious about you and want to be able to relate and connect, which are desires common to everyone.

Instead of letting this part of yourself become a burden, use it as a way to form more connection with the people around you. Go with your friends to vegan/vegan-friendly restaurants and see what new foods you can experience. Cook with people to explore diverse cuisines; go to vegan clubs and organizations to meet new friends — there are so many doors that you can open if you just try.

5

Date Night with The Kingsmen

I should have gotten around to this much earlier. Oh well, better late than never. 

I was so thrilled upon receiving the news that I won passes to go watch the Premier Screening of The Kingsmen: The Secret Service. Unfortunately, by the end of the night, I and my boyfriend were quite disappointed with the outcome. It wasn’t as great as we expected it to be. Honestly, the only saving grace of this movie was Colin Firth. Without him, it would have been such a tragic event.

The first 45 minutes was quite good, it left me wanting more. By that point, my boyfriend had a look on his face saying “My expectations of this movie just keeps on getting lower and lower”. I thought it was going to be a little bit like James Bond involving teenagers of course and a little tinge of British humour. I was mistaken. The jokes aren’t that funny, the main actor isn’t that good of an actor, Samuel L. Jackson should not have been casted, could someone shed light on the legs of Samuel L. Jackson’s assistant? 

Don’t get me started on the ending. It was horrible! It was literally an explosion of colourful Skittles and gooey gummy bears everywhere. The movie became more of a joke than it already was.

Whatever the case is our rating was a 6.5/10. Not that bad, but not that great either. 


A foolproof way to beautify your brows

I’m a big believer that eyebrows play a major role in your overall look. Although I don’t usually do anything makeup-wise to my brows other than comb them into place, I still like to have a defining pencil on hand just in case the mood strikes. It’s a sad, sad day when you actually reach for your favorite eyebrow definer (in this case, Dior’s Diorshow Brow Styler) and it’s been so long that it’s basically dried out, and it crumbles when you try to use it. (BTW: This brow pencil is amazing because it comes in one universal shade that works on anyone, and the superfine point delivers truly natural-looking definition. Oh, and I really love the spooly brush hidden on the other end.)

I didn’t panic because I had just received Pixi Beauty’s Natural Brow Duo, and let’s just say I’m probably not going to buy the Dior again (and save a lot of money.) This two-sided brow enhancer features a waterproof pencil on one side and a tinted gel on the other, so you can do your defining and relax knowing that your brows (and the color you added) will stay in place all day. The pencil has an angled tip for precise application, and it comes in three colors (Natural Brown, Deep Brunette and Soft Black) so you can find your perfect match. For $16 you basically get two products in one—and an amazing way to get it on the bold brow trend.