ogaz

ogazism

I think I’m developing feelings for Joe. 

 I felt very connected with him today, and discovered his beauty. 

 I exercised my will of self control. Had I not, I may have made love to a man that could have left a mark on my soul. I haven’t always viewed joe this way. 

But in the early hours this morning, as we explored ourselves and found mutual warmth and desire, something happened. 

It was more than a rush of passion, or drug induced lust. It was an unspoken word neither of us heard before. It was wholly and honest. 

It was something. 

Now what?
Drift. and roam.
But don’t go home.
For home is where the heart lies
And i gave my heart away
Sometime ago
Now I want it back

Future unsure for troubled New Mexico green chile production

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Green chiles have defined New Mexico for generations, gaining fans and fame around the globe.

However, as this year’s harvest begins, labor shortages, shrinking acreage, drought and foreign competition have hurt production in the state.

Farmers and producers say the problems reveal the need for changes in the industry.

To rejuvenate production, investors and inventors are testing machines that would harvest and de-stem the crop.

The delicate chiles are now picked by hand, and problems with bruising and the removal of stems have made it difficult to make the transition to machines.

“The labor force is getting older and not a lot of young people are getting into the business,” said Ed Ogaz, owner of the Anthony, New Mexico-based chile wholesaler Seco Spice Co. “Something needs to happen.”

Ogaz prefers the old ways and believes farmers need more laborers to improve production as acreage dedicated to chile production has fallen to a 43-year low in the state.

Chile has been a staple of New Mexico cuisine for centuries, and the Hatch region has become world famous for its flavorful hot peppers.

Chile is also the state vegetable and the basis of the official state question, “red or green?”

In recent years, researchers at New Mexico State University have been trying to solve the labor issue by developing machines for the harvest.

Elad Etgar, inventor of a chile-harvesting device at an Israeli company, said he will be testing his machine for the next two months. After the harvest, he’ll sit down with farmers to assess its performance.

“So far, everyone supports it but we will have to see,” Etgar told The Associated Press.

Another device by a New Hampshire investor also is being tested.

Ogaz said he is withholding judgment until he sees how the devices harvest green chiles without damaging the signature look.

The stakes are high. In 2014, New Mexico saw a 10 percent decline in acres of chiles harvested. Experts say the state is losing chile acreage to West Texas and Mexico, partly because of the cost and availability of labor.

Despite marketing efforts and the attractiveness of New Mexico chiles to national suppliers, federal numbers show the value of New Mexico red and green chiles was estimated at $38.7 million, compared to $49.5 million in 2013.

State officials say the number reflects only the value of agricultural items in the raw commodity state. They point to New Mexico Chile Association numbers that say the full economic impact of chiles, both fresh and processed, was more than $460 million a year.

“Fresh green chile is what satisfies our cravings in August and September, so that’s the foundation of New Mexico’s chile economy,” New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said.

___

Follow Russell Contreras at http://twitter.com/russcontreras.

Future unsure for troubled New Mexico green chile production

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Green chiles, the signature crop of New Mexico, are in danger.

As this year’s harvest begins, labor shortages, drought and foreign competition have hurt production in the state.

Farmers and producers say shrinking acreage set aside for the crop also highlights the need for changes in the industry that has helped define New Mexico for generations.

To rejuvenate production, investors and inventors are testing machines that would harvest and de-stem the crop.

The delicate chiles are now picked by hand, and problems with bruising and the removal of stems have made it difficult to make the change to machines.

Ed Ogaz, owner of chile wholesaler Seco Spice Co., prefers the old ways and believes farmers need more laborers to improve production.

Future unsure for troubled New Mexico green chile production

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Green chiles have defined New Mexico for generations, gaining fans and fame around the globe.

However, as this year’s harvest begins, labor shortages, shrinking acreage, drought and foreign competition have hurt production in the state.

Farmers and producers say the problems reveal the need for changes in the industry.

To rejuvenate production, investors and inventors are testing machines that would harvest and de-stem the crop.

The delicate chiles are now picked by hand, and problems with bruising and the removal of stems have made it difficult to make the transition to machines.

“The labor force is getting older and not a lot of young people are getting into the business,” said Ed Ogaz, owner of the Anthony, New Mexico-based chile wholesaler Seco Spice Co. “Something needs to happen.”

Ogaz prefers the old ways and believes farmers need more laborers to improve production as acreage dedicated to chile production has fallen to a 43-year low in the state.

Chile has been a staple of New Mexico cuisine for centuries, and the Hatch region has become world famous for its flavorful hot peppers.

Chile is also the state vegetable and the basis of the official state question, “red or green?”

In recent years, researchers at New Mexico State University have been trying to solve the labor issue by developing machines for the harvest.

Elad Etgar, inventor of a chile-harvesting device at an Israeli company, said he will be testing his machine for the next two months. After the harvest, he’ll sit down with farmers to assess its performance.

“So far, everyone supports it but we will have to see,” Etgar told The Associated Press.

Another device by a New Hampshire investor also is being tested.

Ogaz said he is withholding judgment until he sees how the devices harvest green chiles without damaging the signature look.

The stakes are high. In 2014, New Mexico saw a 10 percent decline in acres of chiles harvested. Experts say the state is losing chile acreage to West Texas and Mexico, partly because of the cost and availability of labor.

Despite marketing efforts and the attractiveness of New Mexico chiles to national suppliers, federal numbers show the value of New Mexico red and green chiles was estimated at $38.7 million, compared to $49.5 million in 2013.

State officials say the number reflects only the value of agricultural items in the raw commodity state. They point to New Mexico Chile Association numbers that say the full economic impact of chiles, both fresh and processed, was more than $460 million a year.

“Fresh green chile is what satisfies our cravings in August and September, so that’s the foundation of New Mexico’s chile economy,” New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said.

___

Follow Russell Contreras at http://twitter.com/russcontreras.

Future unsure for troubled New Mexico green chile production

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Green chiles have defined New Mexico for generations, gaining fans and fame around the globe.

However, as this year’s harvest begins, labor shortages, shrinking acreage, drought and foreign competition have hurt production in the state.

Farmers and producers say the problems reveal the need for changes in the industry.

To rejuvenate production, investors and inventors are testing machines that would harvest and de-stem the crop.

The delicate chiles are now picked by hand, and problems with bruising and the removal of stems have made it difficult to make the transition to machines.

“The labor force is getting older and not a lot of young people are getting into the business,” said Ed Ogaz, owner of the Anthony, New Mexico-based chile wholesaler Seco Spice Co. “Something needs to happen.”

Ogaz prefers the old ways and believes farmers need more laborers to improve production as acreage dedicated to chile production has fallen to a 43-year low in the state.

Chile has been a staple of New Mexico cuisine for centuries, and the Hatch region has become world famous for its flavorful hot peppers.

Chile is also the state vegetable and the basis of the official state question, “red or green?”

In recent years, researchers at New Mexico State University have been trying to solve the labor issue by developing machines for the harvest.

Elad Etgar, inventor of a chile-harvesting device at an Israeli company, said he will be testing his machine for the next two months. After the harvest, he’ll sit down with farmers to assess its performance.

“So far, everyone supports it but we will have to see,” Etgar told The Associated Press.

Another device by a New Hampshire investor also is being tested.

Ogaz said he is withholding judgment until he sees how the devices harvest green chiles without damaging the signature look.

The stakes are high. In 2014, New Mexico saw a 10 percent decline in acres of chiles harvested. Experts say the state is losing chile acreage to West Texas and Mexico, partly because of the cost and availability of labor.

Despite marketing efforts and the attractiveness of New Mexico chiles to national suppliers, federal numbers show the value of New Mexico red and green chiles was estimated at $38.7 million, compared to $49.5 million in 2013.

State officials say the number reflects only the value of agricultural items in the raw commodity state. They point to New Mexico Chile Association numbers that say the full economic impact of chiles, both fresh and processed, was more than $460 million a year.

“Fresh green chile is what satisfies our cravings in August and September, so that’s the foundation of New Mexico’s chile economy,” New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said.

___

Follow Russell Contreras at http://twitter.com/russcontreras.

Future unsure for troubled New Mexico green chile production

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Green chiles have defined New Mexico for generations, gaining fans and fame around the globe.

However, as this year’s harvest begins, labor shortages, shrinking acreage, drought and foreign competition have hurt production in the state.

Farmers and producers say the problems reveal the need for changes in the industry.

To rejuvenate production, investors and inventors are testing machines that would harvest and de-stem the crop.

The delicate chiles are now picked by hand, and problems with bruising and the removal of stems have made it difficult to make the transition to machines.

“The labor force is getting older and not a lot of young people are getting into the business,” said Ed Ogaz, owner of the Anthony, New Mexico-based chile wholesaler Seco Spice Co. “Something needs to happen.”

Ogaz prefers the old ways and believes farmers need more laborers to improve production as acreage dedicated to chile production has fallen to a 43-year low in the state.

Chile has been a staple of New Mexico cuisine for centuries, and the Hatch region has become world famous for its flavorful hot peppers.

Chile is also the state vegetable and the basis of the official state question, “red or green?”

In recent years, researchers at New Mexico State University have been trying to solve the labor issue by developing machines for the harvest.

Elad Etgar, inventor of a chile-harvesting device at an Israeli company, said he will be testing his machine for the next two months. After the harvest, he’ll sit down with farmers to assess its performance.

“So far, everyone supports it but we will have to see,” Etgar told The Associated Press.

Another device by a New Hampshire investor also is being tested.

Ogaz said he is withholding judgment until he sees how the devices harvest green chiles without damaging the signature look.

The stakes are high. In 2014, New Mexico saw a 10 percent decline in acres of chiles harvested. Experts say the state is losing chile acreage to West Texas and Mexico, partly because of the cost and availability of labor.

Despite marketing efforts and the attractiveness of New Mexico chiles to national suppliers, federal numbers show the value of New Mexico red and green chiles was estimated at $38.7 million, compared to $49.5 million in 2013.

State officials say the number reflects only the value of agricultural items in the raw commodity state. They point to New Mexico Chile Association numbers that say the full economic impact of chiles, both fresh and processed, was more than $460 million a year.

“Fresh green chile is what satisfies our cravings in August and September, so that’s the foundation of New Mexico’s chile economy,” New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said.

___

Follow Russell Contreras at http://twitter.com/russcontreras.

Buscan salvar al chile en Nuevo México mediante mecanización

ALBUQUERQUE, Nuevo México, EE.UU. (AP) — El chile verde ha definido a Nuevo México durante generaciones, ganando fanáticos y fama en todo el mundo.

Sin embargo, en momentos en que comienza la cosecha de este año, la escasez de mano de obra, la reducción de las áreas de cultivo, una sequía y competencia extranjera han afectado la producción en el estado.

Granjeros y productores dicen que los problemas revelan la necesidad de hacer cambios en el sector. Para reanimar la producción, inversionistas e inventores están probando máquinas que recogerían y destallarían la cosecha.

En la actualidad los chiles son recogidos a mano, y los problemas con las magulladuras y los tallos han dificultado la transición al uso de máquinas.

“La fuerza laboral está envejeciendo y no hay muchos jóvenes que ingresen al negocio”, dijo Ed Ogaz, dueño de Seco Spice Co., una comercializadora mayorista de chile basada en Anthony, Nuevo México. “Se requiere que ocurra algo nuevo”.

Ogaz prefiere las formas tradicionales y piensa que los granjeros necesitan más jornaleros para mejorar la producción, en momentos en que el área de tierras dedicadas al cultivo de chiles en el estado ha caído a su menor nivel en 43 años.

El chile ha sido un elemento constante en la cocina de Nuevo México durante siglos, y la región de Hatch es famosa por sus deliciosos chiles picantes.

Además es el vegetal estatal y la base de la pregunta oficial: “¿Rojo o verde?”

En años recientes, investigadores en la Universidad Estatal de Nuevo México han estado tratando de resolver el problema de la mano de obra a través del desarrollo de máquinas para la cosecha.

Elad Etgar, inventor de un aparato recogedor de chile en una compañía israelí, dijo que probará su máquina en los próximos dos meses. Tras la cosecha, hablará con granjeros para evaluar su rendimiento.

“Hasta ahora, todo el mundo lo apoya, pero tendremos que esperar a ver”, le dijo Etgar a The Associated Press.

Otro aparato producido por un inversionista en Nueva Hampshire también está siendo probado.

Ogaz dijo que no va a ofrecer su opinión hasta que vea cómo las máquinas recogen los chiles verdes sin dañar su apariencia.

Lo que está en juego es importante. En el 2014, Nuevo México registró una declinación de 10% en áreas de chiles cosechados. Los expertos dicen que el estado está perdiendo terreno cultivado ante la competencia de México y el oeste de Texas, en parte por el costo y la disponibilidad de mano de obra.

Pese a esfuerzos de promoción y el atractivo de los chiles de Nuevo México para los abastecedores nacionales, cifras federales muestran que el valor de los chiles rojos y verdes del estado fue estimado en 38,7 millones de dólares, comparado con 49,5 millones en el 2013.

Funcionarios del estado dijeron que la cifra refleja solamente el valor de productos agrícolas no procesados. Hacen notar las cifras de la Asociación de Chile de Nuevo México que indican que el impacto total de los chiles, frescos y procesados, fue de más de 460 millones de dólares anuales.

“El chile verde fresco es lo que satisface nuestros apetitos de agosto a septiembre, así que es la base de la economía del chile en Nuevo México”, dijo el secretario de agricultura del estado, Jeff Witte.

___

Russell Contreras está en Twitter como: http://twitter.com/russcontreras.

Future unsure for troubled New Mexico green chile production

ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico (AP) — Green chiles have defined New Mexico for generations but as this year’s harvest begins, labor shortages, shrinking acreage, drought and foreign competition have hurt production in the state.

To rejuvenate production, investors and inventors are testing machines that would harvest and de-stem the crop.

The delicate chiles are now picked by hand, and problems with bruising and the removal of stems have made it difficult to make the transition to machines.

“The labor force is getting older and not a lot of young people are getting into the business,” said Ed Ogaz, owner of the Anthony, New Mexico-based chile wholesaler Seco Spice Co. “Something needs to happen.”

Ogaz prefers the old ways and believes farmers need more laborers to improve production as acreage dedicated to chile production has fallen to a 43-year low in the state.

Chile has been a staple of New Mexico cuisine for centuries, and the Hatch region has become world famous for its flavorful hot peppers.

In recent years, researchers at New Mexico State University have been trying to solve the labor issue by developing machines for the harvest.

Elad Etgar, inventor of a chile-harvesting device at an Israeli company, said he will be testing his machine for the next two months. After the harvest, he’ll sit down with farmers to assess its performance.

“So far, everyone supports it but we will have to see,” Etgar told The Associated Press.

Another device by a New Hampshire investor also is being tested.

Ogaz said he is withholding judgment until he sees how the devices harvest green chiles without damaging the signature look.

The stakes are high. In 2014, New Mexico saw a 10 percent decline in acres of chiles harvested. Experts say the state is losing chile acreage to West Texas and Mexico, partly because of the cost and availability of labor.

Despite marketing efforts and the attractiveness of New Mexico chiles to national suppliers, federal numbers show the value of New Mexico red and green chiles was estimated at $38.7 million, compared to $49.5 million in 2013.

State officials say the number reflects only the value of agricultural items in the raw commodity state. They point to New Mexico Chile Association numbers that say the full economic impact of chiles, both fresh and processed, was more than $460 million a year.

“Fresh green chile is what satisfies our cravings in August and September, so that’s the foundation of New Mexico’s chile economy,” New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said.

___

Follow Russell Contreras at http://twitter.com/russcontreras.

Future unsure for troubled New Mexico green chile production

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Green chiles have defined New Mexico for generations, gaining fans and fame around the globe.

However, as this year’s harvest begins, labor shortages, shrinking acreage, drought and foreign competition have hurt production in the state.

Farmers and producers say the problems reveal the need for changes in the industry.

To rejuvenate production, investors and inventors are testing machines that would harvest and de-stem the crop.

The delicate chiles are now picked by hand, and problems with bruising and the removal of stems have made it difficult to make the transition to machines.

“The labor force is getting older and not a lot of young people are getting into the business,” said Ed Ogaz, owner of the Anthony, New Mexico-based chile wholesaler Seco Spice Co. “Something needs to happen.”

Ogaz prefers the old ways and believes farmers need more laborers to improve production as acreage dedicated to chile production has fallen to a 43-year low in the state.

Chile has been a staple of New Mexico cuisine for centuries, and the Hatch region has become world famous for its flavorful hot peppers.

Chile is also the state vegetable and the basis of the official state question, “red or green?”

In recent years, researchers at New Mexico State University have been trying to solve the labor issue by developing machines for the harvest.

Elad Etgar, inventor of a chile-harvesting device at an Israeli company, said he will be testing his machine for the next two months. After the harvest, he’ll sit down with farmers to assess its performance.

“So far, everyone supports it but we will have to see,” Etgar told The Associated Press.

Another device by a New Hampshire investor also is being tested.

Ogaz said he is withholding judgment until he sees how the devices harvest green chiles without damaging the signature look.

The stakes are high. In 2014, New Mexico saw a 10 percent decline in acres of chiles harvested. Experts say the state is losing chile acreage to West Texas and Mexico, partly because of the cost and availability of labor.

Despite marketing efforts and the attractiveness of New Mexico chiles to national suppliers, federal numbers show the value of New Mexico red and green chiles was estimated at $38.7 million, compared to $49.5 million in 2013.

State officials say the number reflects only the value of agricultural items in the raw commodity state. They point to New Mexico Chile Association numbers that say the full economic impact of chiles, both fresh and processed, was more than $460 million a year.

“Fresh green chile is what satisfies our cravings in August and September, so that’s the foundation of New Mexico’s chile economy,” New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said.

___

Follow Russell Contreras at http://twitter.com/russcontreras.