offshoring

5

Carmen Goodyear, one of the founders of Country Women magazine, and her wife Laurie York.

“Carmen Goodyear and Laurie York, partners in farm and marriage, have for decades forged an existence removed from consumerism, rooted in communal living, and above all, situated close to nature. This farm and preserve is where they have raised goats, sheep, chickens, and bees; where they have grown a mammoth garden that supplies most of their food; where they have helped wage successful battles against offshore oil drilling, a nuclear power plant, and GMOs; where they have, after many years together, gotten legally married …” 

From “Country Women” by Rebecca Bengal for Vogue, June 25, 2017. Photographs by Amanda Jasnowski Pascual.

  • Paul Ryan: The idea of Obamacare is that the people who are healthy pay for the people who are sick.
  • Lemony Snicket: What Paul Ryan does not appear to understand, dear reader, is that health insurance, like all insurance, works by pooling risks. No individual is likely to need all of the medical care at once. You may be healthy one year and pay for someone else when they lose their leg to lachrymose leeches, and they for you next year, but we will all need some of it eventually. This is the same whether your insurance is through the Affordable Care Act, or through an offshore account in Peru.

Concept: one of those “hyper-intelligent shark terrorises scientists at offshore research facility” movies (can you believe that’s an actual genre?), except partway through the movie it turns out that the facility’s director is secretly the leader of an apocalypse cult and is trying to summon Cthulhu, and the shark is trying to stop him. In the end, the interns team up with the shark to bring down the cult and its master.

Parrot of the Week 6

If you want to be tagged in future updates or if you want to request a species, send me an ask!

Kākāpō

Scientific Name: Strigops habroptilus

Classification: Kingdom: Animalia > Phylum: Chordata > Class: Aves > Order: Psittaciformes >  Family: Strigopidae > Genus: Strigops > Species: habroptilus

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered; there are 153 as of 2016

Other Common Names: Night parrot, owl parrot, tarapo, tarepo

Average Length (wild): 23 – 25 in, 58 – 64 cm

Average Weight (wild): 2 – 9 lb, 0.95 – 4 kg

Originally posted by jesuisbavarde

Average Lifespan: 58 years, but have potential to live into their 90s. Their exact lifespan is unknown. Researchers in the recovery program will know when the kakapo hatched in the recovery effort die of old age, which could be decades from now.

(Above: Historic range; Below: Current range)

Native Range: Used to live from the far north of the North Island to the south of the South Island. Now they are only found on offshore islands that are protected areas without introduced predators. It is not believed that there are any left on the main land of New Zealand, when the recovery program began they were all captured from the Fiordland National Park and brought to protected zones. They currently live on Codfish Island (Whenua Hau), Little Barrier Island (Hauturu ao Toi), and Anchor Island.

Naturalized Range: N/A

Natural Habitat: Formally from sea level to near tops of mountains. They are ground dwellers who live in forest substrate and scrubland.

Flock Size: They are solitary, gathering only to breed

Originally posted by svartvitkatt

Call: Loud screeching “skraark

Breeding: They do not breed every year, as they will only breed when there is enough rimu fruit.

Breeding season starts around December and lasts until April

They engage in “lek” breeding, which is when the males compete for female attention. They are the only parrot species and New Zealand bird species to do this.

The male inflates like a balloon, and then emits a low boom which can be heard from up to 5 km away. This lets any females in the area know that he is ready to mate

After 20 -30 booms, the male emits a high-pitched ‘ching’, which pinpoints his position, allowing females to find him

This booming and chinging can last for 8 hours nonstop every night for 2-3 months during breeding season

(Above: Booming Sketch)

Nesting: The female lays 1-4 eggs. They are similar in size to chicken eggs and will hatch after 30 days. The female raises them by herself, and has to leave the nest at night to search for food. After 10 weeks, the fledglings leave the nest, but may still be fed by their mother for up to 6 months.

Wild Diet: The berries of the Rimu plant (see picture) are their favorite food. They also eat parts of other native plants, including the fruits, seeds, bark, bulbs, leaves, stems, mosses, ferns, fungi, and roots. Species include pink pine, stinkwood, Hall’s totara, and mountain flax. When food species that are important to their diet become abundant, they feed exclusively on it.

    Currently, they are also fed pellets, freeze-dried and frozen fruit, walnuts, and pine conelets by the recovery effort.

Sexually Dimorphic: Yes, the males are larger

Description (wild): The upper side of their body is green with random black, brown, and yellow barring and mottling. Their underparts are a yellow-green and have irregular yellow and brown barring. The face is yellow-brown and the beak is grey and smaller in females. The primary wing feathers are tipped with yellow in males and green and brown in females. The tail is green and brown with yellow and black barring and flecks.

Color Mutations: N/A

Noise Level: Loud

Talking Ability: N/A

Personality: They are nocturnal and solitary and roost on the ground or in trees during the day. When disturbed, they freeze, trying to blend in with their background.

Originally posted by biomorphosis

Behavioral Concerns: They are not equipped to deal with human intrusion and introduced predators, which caused their numbers to decline rapidly. By 1970, there were only 18 males left in Fiordland. In 1977, a small population of both males and females were found.

Health Concerns: Recently there has been an increase in cases of “crusty butt”, which is a viral infection that causes the cloaca to become inflamed, and presents like severe dermatitis. 

It is still unknown what is causing the virus and if it is infectious. There has been one death due to this infection, and treatment, a topical cream, seems to only help some individuals. 

As of now, it is only found on Codfish Island, and has been since 2002. 

It is being taken very seriously and is being closely monitored, with research being done to learn more about it.

Aviculture: N/A

History in Captivity: Some young chicks are raised in captivity as part of a Conservation attempt to save the species. Conservation and recovery of this species has been going one since 1977, when a population of both females and males were found on Stewart Island.

Fun Facts: They are the largest parrot species in the world (by weight) and possibly the oldest living bird!

Originally posted by welcometoyouredoom

Sirocco, a male kakapo born March 23, 1997, was raised in captivity due to a illness that required he be hand raised and quarantined from other kakapo. He now thinks he’s human and is a conservation ambassador for the kakapo. 

He proved that kakapo can swim, after deciding to join one of the rangers’ family who were swimming in the ocean. He jumped off the jetty and paddled around for a bit before going back to shore, completely nonchalant. 

He is also the kakapo who made his species famous after “shagging” Mark Cawardine on the BBC series “Last Chance to See”. 

You can follow him on twitter @Spokesbird

Originally posted by jerkandcry

Tags: @thescorpionqueen

Australia is abandoning 816 asylum seekers. 

The PNG Government is sick of Australia’s arrogance and ignorance, and after finding our offshore detention facilities on Manus Island unlawful earlier this year, warned Australia to close them.

Which Australia is… well, technically doing. But not in a way that involves them taking any responsibility for the burden they have put on the island nation, nor showing an ounce of compassion for the asylum seekers - 90%+ of whom are legitimate refugees, some of them even already certified - who came here seeking our help and instead found themselves locked up in conditions designed to deter them from fleeing some of the most horrific regimes in the world.

Instead, Australia is simply closing the camp. Electricity has already been cut off in part of the camp, as has water. Food stopped being served on Sunday, but packs were given out with enough food to last until Tuesday.

That’s tomorrow.

816 men came looking for our help and found themselves imprisoned, tortured, and now abandoned.

Demand better of our country, Australia.

nytimes.com
Trump Moves to Open Nearly All Offshore Waters to Drilling
The energy industry would have broad access to most of the outer continental shelf, reversing part of Barack Obama’s environmental legacy.
By Lisa Friedman

Unacceptable!! Join us today, and we will be fighting back on this: climatetruth.org

January 8, 2018

Let me start by saying that I still very strongly support net neutrality, and I am glad our state has chosen to fight for it. I hope the same attitude is taken on other national concerns, such as supporting women’s rights, healthcare, the EPA, and NASA.

In terms of more specific goals, ending the Temporary Protected Status for Haitians, Nicaraguans, and now Salvadorans is churlish and wrong. Ending DACA is even worse. Please allow our citizens to remain in our country without impugning their liberties or violating their basic human rights. People in America should not feel threatened by our government. The government was made to serve the people, not limit them.

The government was also not designed to expose our citizens and our country to more danger. As such, please continue to do everything you can to prevent offshore drilling, both for our state and our country. ANWR and tribal lands aren’t even ours to violate, and yet somehow we’ve managed to put them at risk, too, which would be shameful- if I thought our legislators had any sense of shame left. Endangering America for profit might be our president’s byline, but that does not make it acceptable.

Speaking of Americans in danger- why haven’t we provided more assistance to Puerto Rico? Our citizens are starving, unsheltered, and powerless. Why have we not remedied this? Either they are part of our country or they are not, and honestly either way we should be helping them rebuild. A great deal of our medical supplies are manufactured there, and our healthcare system doesn’t need any more handicaps.

As far as supplying aid is concerned, what on earth is going on with Pakistan? Supply aid or don’t, but civilian assistance (food, water, medicine) should never be based on military action or inaction. Aid is not a punitive thing, and America is no country’s babysitter- we can’t even look after or control ourselves right now.

There is no justification for the steady, sinister erosion of American values that is taking place. I am embarrassed to live here.

  • me: i love australia because it has a really diverse population, strict gun control, near-perfect separation of church and state, a relative absence of political extremism, great memes, and beautiful natural wonders
  • also me: i hate australia because the government refuses to legalise gay marriage, our political system is highly unstable and every time we replace our leader it causes mass confusion, a coal mine is currently being planned practically on top of the great barrier reef, and any refugees who attempt to come here by boat are locked up indefinitely in offshore concentration camps with a total media blackout in place so no-one knows the extent of the human rights violations that are happening there
What Goes Up...

The group I DM for, mostly levels 4 and 5, had been asking if they could do a quest that involved sailing. So I dusted off Stormwrack and settled of The Sable Drake. They had tracked the ship to the pirates hideout and were engaging in a sea battle offshore. The crew were all still alive but Captain Naki had all but crippled the ship and were preparing to board.

Cleric casts Wind Wall

Cleric: “That will keep them from shooting us but they can just walk through it.”

Ranger: “Yeah but the captain’s a wererat. If she gets on board she could bite us. I don’t want to get bit!”

Bard OOC: hey *DM* is the catapult still loaded?

DM: Yes, but the Sable Drake is too close to use it.

Bard OOC: Can I tie my rope to the rock.

DM: Yes? It takes 5 feet to wrap the rock. May I ask why?

Bard: I tie the rope and tell the crew member to prepare to fire. Hey, *Ranger* can I borrow your rope?“

Ranger: “Uh, sure.”

Bard: I tie her rope onto mine and say “Get ready.”

Captain Naki proceeds to board the ship after the party surrendered.

“So nice to have an easy capture. Just hand over the valuables and I’ll make your deaths quick.”

Bard: “Now *Ranger*!”

Ranger throws the rope at Naki and the bard casts Animate Rope on it to ranger her. Naki fails her save and is tangled.

The DM suddenly realizes what the rope is for.

Bard: “Fire the Catapult!”

The catapult is fired and Naki goes sailing towards the beach. The DM didn’t even bother to roll for fall damage.

“Good job. You’ve Tom and Jerry’d yet another boss fight.”

Entire table is losing their shit.

The party then proceeds to capture the Sable Drake and for themselves renamed it The Flying Goblin.

10

Tuatara

Tuatara are reptiles endemic to New Zealand. Although resembling most lizards, they are part of a distinct lineage, the order Rhynchocephalia. The single species of tuatara is the only surviving member of its order, which flourished around 200 million years ago. Their name derives from the Māori language, and means “peaks on the back”. Their most recent common ancestor with any other extant group is with the squamates (lizards and snakes). The average lifespan is about 60 years, but they can live to be well over 100 years old. Some experts believe that captive tuatara could live as long as 200 years.

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