offset is everything

Les Amis: Bossuet

Bossuet was a gay but unlucky fellow. His specialty was not to succeed in anything. As an offset, he laughed at everything. He possessed knowledge and wit, but all he did miscarried. He soon reached his last sou, never his last burst of laughter. When adversity entered his doors, he saluted this old acquaintance cordially.

Hell yes! Just realized that the recently removed requirement for entire skeleton in SL mesh uploads makes it now possible to upload partial offsets without breaking everything :D

The robohand was uploaded with different offsets because of its weird shape, but just look at em playing so nicely together without killing each other~

egregiousmeme  asked:

Hey I stumbled across this blog and I have to say your art is really stunning, especially because it's hard to do anything in traditional (at least for me.) So with that being said, do you have any techniques when it comes to coloring that you can share since the colors you make seem to be so vibrant and solid? owo /

Wow thank you! Well with techniques most of the time I just try to have contrast. If I use a lot of dark colors I like to add some bright pastel colors just to offset everything. I also use a large variety of colors and experiment with colors and test them before I actually color in the picture. Oh I also use the same color Copic when shading after I finished the first layer, to me it reduces more of one piece sticking out. :)

Choosing an Advisor

Finding some who matches your research interest(s), primary field, secondary field, regional specialty, theoretical inclinations, work ethic, life philosophy, etc but also has networks, name recognition, etc who will also push for your success in ways unbeknownst to you AND is someone you respect, like, get along with, and can see a happy future with makes me want cry.

Oh. And even though it takes time to cultivate some of these traits, their AGE could offset everything. And gender.

Choosing an advisor > finding a partner

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those who barely missed becoming historic: laigle ‘bossuet’ de meaux

Bossuet was a gay but unlucky fellow. His specialty was not to succeed in anything. As an offset, he laughed at everything. He possessed knowledge and wit, but all he did miscarried. He soon reached his last sou, never his last burst of laughter. When adversity entered his doors, he saluted this old acquaintance cordially. 

Okay, so I’m posting that fic.

Basic summary is: Komaeda lives through chapter five (see here for how) and once they get to the tail end of chapter six, Enoshima turns Hinata into Kamukura, revealing the true mastermind and a different final battle between hope and despair.

Pairings: Komahina, implied Komakura but you can definitely see it differently. There’s in general a lot of wiggle room in this fic for things like that. Different ways you can interpret things. Like the end of the real game, I wanted it to be vague and heavily symbolic.

Words: 4206

Warnings: Might seem OOC for some characters for people. I want to stress that I don’t think Komaeda could actually get to this point in the game without developing somewhat, and again reading the linked fic will help, since they take place in the same verse. Also, I have very specific headcanons for Izuru, and they might not match up with what you think. I hope I managed to capture him, though. I’m really nervous about this one, but I  really hope people like this, because I poured a lot of effort into it. I hope there’s at least one aspect you enjoy.

As for serious warnings, there’s nothing major in terms of CWs.

Hinata was so bright, as ever. It made him happy he survived this long, didn’t have a chance to go through with his plan. Glad Hinata stopped him.

Even amidst the despair of knowing the Tragedy, even the despair of all this death, and lies, this fake world made up to trick and entrance them, he shone like a star against the despair. Komaeda truly believed he was watching true hope be born.

Hinata-kun said I could find hope within myself, but he was wrong. Hinata-kun held that hope inside him all along.

If it hadn’t been for Hinata’s brilliant hope, how he pushed forward, Komaeda would have shattered at the revelation that they were all Ultimate Despair. He would have tried to do something reckless, something that the previous him would have thought was a sacrifice in the name of hope, for the birth of absolute hope.

This was exactly the ending he had wanted, why he’d kick started the killing. Hinata wouldn’t understand, but if he hadn’t gone through all that death, betrayal and despair, he wouldn’t have become hope. He wouldn’t have risen up and shown him such a beautiful light. Even Enoshima’s vengeful voice didn’t catch his attention at first, he was so distracted.

Keep reading

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“Joly was studying medicine. He was two years younger than Bossuet.
Joly was the "malade imaginaire” junior. What he had won in medicine was to be more of an invalid than a doctor. At three and twenty he thought himself a valetudinarian, and passed his life in inspecting his tongue in the mirror.“

"Bossuet was a gay but unlucky fellow. His specialty was not to succeed in anything. As an offset, he laughed at everything. At five and twenty he was bald. He soon reached his last sou, never his last burst of laughter. Bossuet had not much domicile, sometimes none at all. He lodged now with one, now with another, most often with Joly.”

Those two are definitely married - Hugo’s OTP, I’m pretty sure! 8D

I don’t know why, but I always imagined Joly having straw blonde or even red hair and a lot of freckles, more like Marius in the 2012 movie version. But Marius always was black-haired for me so yeah xD

What is composition and why Tumblr needs to stop its love affair with the Golden Ratio

If you’ve been on Tumblr longer than ten minutes then chances are you’ve seen a post about how some movie or TV show is so well done and looks so good because of the Golden Ratio. 

However, 99.9% of the time I see these posts, they aren’t actually utilizing composition correctly. So I’m going to tell you how to properly find composition:

 1) so that you can be smug to your friends so you can gain more knowledge and spread it wide

2) I can stop wanting to rip my hair out every time I see the Golden Ratio on literally anything now

Lets start with what you’re doing wrong. 

There’s a popular post on Tumblr about Mad Max: Fury Road. Here’s a sample of some of their photo evidence:

That’s not how the Force composition works

And it’s definitely not how the Golden Ratio works.

See the thing about a ratio and composition is that it has to be uniform. The Golden Ratio works when it takes up the entirety of the frame. Neither of these (nor any of the photos in that set) are actual examples of good composition through the Golden Ratio because the ratio itself has been warped to conform to prove a point that didn’t actually need proving.

That’s not to say Mad Max isn’t an example of good composition, it definitely is, but y’all are hung up on the Golden Ratio so much you don’t even realise there are a million other composition rules that you didn’t even realise that you’re seeing. 

Firstly, this is how the Golden Ratio actually works:

And here’s an even easier way to look at it:

Because the Golden Ratio itself is all about numbers and math more than anything. Which is why this is pretty much where my understanding of how it works technically stops because I majored in film not math or art history. Here’s some actual examples of how that translates to film, though:

It’s not so much about the spiral as it is about the composition of the image and the ratio on the screen. 

“But wait” you’re saying “you said there are other rules in composition we’re not taking into account. What are they?” The first rule of composition you learn in film school and the most common rule followed is called the Rule of Thirds. Here’s some examples of it:

You’re literally breaking up the frame into nine equal segments to draw the viewers eye to the places you want them to go and you’re offsetting everything from the middle because putting anything in the middle of the frame just doesn’t feel right to the viewer (although obviously this rule can be broken for several different reasons). In these two images, you’re giving your subjects breathing room and following their line of sight to a logical place. 

“I thought you said there were a million composition rules. How come you’re only talking about two?” You’re right, I did say that, and it’s absolutely true, but this post is already way longer than it should be and there’s no way I could cover all of them right now. However, the Rule of Thirds is the most common and now you know how to look for it AND now you can stop misusing the Golden Ratio and really take a look at the Fibonacci Squares and how they work to a film makers advantage.

As for the Mad Max images? Well, the first one is definitely the Rule of Thirds, and the second one follows the rule for Leading Lines and manipulated the depth of the image to its advantage. The movie is very well composed, just not in the way y’all seem to think it is.

Bossuet was a gay but unlucky fellow. His specialty was not to succeed in anything. As an offset, he laughed at everything. At five and twenty he was bald. His father had ended by owning a house and a field; but he, the son, had made haste to lose that house and field in a bad speculation. He had nothing left. He possessed knowledge and wit, but all he did miscarried. Everything failed him and everybody deceived him; what he was building tumbled down on top of him. If he were splitting wood, he cut off a finger. If he had a mistress, he speedily discovered that he had a friend also. Some misfortune happened to him every moment, hence his joviality. He said: ‘I live under falling tiles.’ He was not easily astonished, because, for him, an accident was what he had foreseen, he took his bad luck serenely, and smiled at the teasing of fate, like a person who is listening to pleasantries. He was poor, but his fund of good humor was inexhaustible. He soon reached his last sou, never his last burst of laughter. When adversity entered his doors, he saluted this old acquaintance cordially, he tapped all catastrophes on the stomach; he was familiar with fatality to the point of calling it by its nickname: ‘Good day, Guignon,’ he said to it.

- Les Miserables, 3.4.1

Bossuet commission for needsmoreresearch!