One Piece, Volume 78: Charisma of Evil

216 pages, 10 chapters. From Chapter 776: The Hero of the Colosseum toChapter 785: Even If Your Legs Break

Author: Eiichiro Oda

Available from: July 3, 2015

Well-balanced cover this time. I know that’s just mirroring the previous villain-themed tankobon but this time the characters are better placed and that midline panel is not weirdly integrated in the pic. I would have preferred for something more dynamic for both of those versions, but not bad at all. Nevertheless I don’t know why Usopp and Nico Robin are there. Guess Oda hates Kyros and he wants to replace him with other characters. 

Link: http://books.shueisha.co.jp/CGI/search/syousai_put.cgi?isbn_cd=978-4-08-880422-4

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“I honestly think it’s a manga author’s role to connect people. So I’m really happy that some form of a relationship between perfect strangers can develop (because of my story).”  -ODA EIICHIRO

Happy Birthday Odacchi! (01/01/2015)

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Happy Birthday to the the amazing creator of One Piece, Oda Eiichiro! 

“My staff and I often go to a very noisy Japanese restaurant where a lot of people take their children. There are TVs at each table. If you go there on Sunday nights at 7:30, you’ll see the children staring at the TV screens with their mouths wide open, looking silly. They’re watching…One Piece. When I see that, I never want to let them down.” Oda Eiichiro, 2001

ウソップくんのGIFアニメ。新世界に出てやっと勇敢なる海の戦士になりかけているような気がしてきた。逞しくて、少しカッコイイ。

他に麦わらの一味のGIFアニメをお探し求めの方は、泥棒猫のナミをコチラへ、又は三刀流の海賊狩りのゾロをコチラヘ探るとよいでしょう。

Usopp from One Piece.  Because that show is amazing.  In other news, you can find Nami here and Zoro here.  I hope to get to the rest of the crew soon!

by

Anthony Holden


OP Anniversary, Day 3: Art

Eiichiro Oda’s Desk

Of all of the days for this event, I really wanted to contribute for today’s theme. I love Oda’s art. I love the way he draws his characters and the imagination with which he brings each scene and each arc to life. But when I sat down and thought about it, I couldn’t really pick a favorite period of his work or a favorite colorspread. All of them speak to his passion and his growth as an artist. But then I realized the one thing that all of Oda’s art has in common and it is this that I will pay homage to:

His desk.

This desk has seen most, if not all, of the chapters of One Piece. It was there for every character, good and evil and in between. When Oda leaves this desk at the end of the day, he likely has eraser shavings in his lap and ink under his nails. He has spent countless hours at this desk, inhaling the potent alcoholic fumes of his Copic markers, as he brings the most triumphant characters and loathsome villains to life. Just as you can see his hand in every panel and colorspread, you can see the history of every single one of them on the surface of this ordinary piece of furniture, made extraordinary by an extraordinary man.

Eiichiro Oda’s art has given me so much courage and inspiration. It was heartening to read that he too struggled with coloring backgrounds and that his early colorspreads had white skies because he didn’t think it possible to make one without streaks. When he figured it out, his illustrations became that much more vibrant. And when I tried his technique, mine did the same. When his fountain pen—yes, he inks with a FOUNTAIN PEN—wobbles, it is immortalized for all of us to see. Just as Luffy doesn’t attempt to take back or excuse his actions, Oda doesn’t take back a single line.

Thanks to Oda and to One Piece, I no longer panic when I mess up while inking or when the marker bleeds over a line. His art pushed me to step outside of my comfort zone, to try new things and to never admit defeat when the media decides to be difficult.

And this is the desk where he made all of that happen.