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Vampire!Wonwoo

Originally posted by dophoria

Request: Vampire!Wonwoo AU???
A/N: Hello anon! This is really long so I hope it was worth the wait~ -Admin Madi


  • Ok so Vampire!Wonwoo would have insanely pale skin
  • His everyday eyes were a deep chocolate brown but when he began to feed?
  • A deep crimson
  • His lips would be a faint red that seemed bold against his porcelain skin
  • Unlike what most people think, Wonwoo wouldn’t have the patience to do his hair every morning so he would just let his bangs grow out until he was forced to cut them
  • Wonwoo would wear all black, all the time
  • It didn’t matter if it was 1000 degrees out bc it never affected him
  • His black sweaters would be baggy and he would subconsciously pull the sleeves over his hands and knead at the fabric whenever in close proximity to a stranger
  • Even though he was supposed to be the scary vampire, Wonwoo never did well in crowds
  • What did Wonwoo do to complete his full black outfits you ask?
  • Eyeliner.
  • He would put just a teensy but on his lower waterline and smudge it out for a better effect
  • This made him feel more confident  how precious
  • To draw any attention away from his dark attire, Won likes to wear his round glasses every so often
  • Vampire!Wonwoo only feeds at night when he has privacy
  • He stalks his prey when the sun is out to make sure he knows what he’s getting himself into
  • Enjoys coffee when he’s not drinking blood
  • When he gets bored of following people, he goes to his favorite cafe and orders something new every time
  • This adds some excitement into his very non-exciting life
  • Wonwoo is essentially a shadow
  • He sits in corners and hides behind people so that he can’t be seen most of the time
  • He saw you in a bookstore window one day and knew you were his next victim
  • Wonwoo followed you around all day and realized that you two had similar interests
  • He would smile when he sees you struggling to reach for a book on the top shelf or trip over your own feet
  • Won eventually sees that you’re reading the same book as him and would strike up a convo
  • This is very out of character for Wonwoo, but literature is his weakness
  • He loves the way your eyes come to life when talking about your favorite books and  characters
  • You two became friends after that
  • You would meet up at the bookstore every day and just sit and talk about everything under the sun
  • Eventually, he decides to not kill you
  • How nice of him :)
  • It takes a lot of willpower for him to not bite you

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anonymous asked:

I don't think colonised is the right word, since an indigenous population can't really colonise our own homeland. The modern State of Israel has done some terrible things, and shouldn't be occupying the West Bank, but colonise is the wrong framework for an indigenous group returning home.

lmao do you hear yourself? not to sound rude but saying it isn’t colonisation is dismissing the situation at hand. “indigenous group returning home” is oversimplifying it. i’m not saying jews aren’t indigenous but israel is an example of settler-colonialism. afterall what else would you call the displacement of its inhabitants only to be replaced by another population (not inc. jews who had been living in palestine for centuries) and the re-appropriation of land to where the israeli state sees fit? not to mention israel trying its hardest to redefine the landscape and its character, even trying its best to wash away any sort of arab/muslim character it has.

but even besides that, israel was built in the shadow of british imperialism. not to mention zionism is a european ideology which takes on eurocentric ideals and models!! even early zionist leaders weren’t afraid to call it “colonisation” either. 

please don’t kid yourself 

Palestinian prisoners in Israel suspend hunger strike

A mass hunger strike staged by Palestinian prisoners over conditions in Israeli jails was suspended on Saturday after a deal with Israel, officials said.

About 1,500 inmates launched the actionon April 17, in one of the largest such strikes.

The 40-day hunger strike raised tensions with Israel as protests in support of the strikers spilled over into clashes in the occupied West Bank and along the Israel-Gaza border.

More than 800 prisoners, who had stuck with the hunger strike until Saturday, ended it after talks held with the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC) and the Palestinian Authority concluded in an agreement with Israel, allowing prisoners to receive two visitors per month.

Issa Karaka, Chairman of Prisoners’ Affairs at the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO), confirmed the inmates had agreed to stop the strike.

WATCH: What’s behind Palestinian prisoners’ hunger strike?

On Wednesday, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein urged Israel to improve conditions for Palestinians in its custody.

Both Karaka and the Israeli Prisons Service did not initially divulge the full details of the agreement. However, the Prison Service did say that a second monthly family visit would be reinstated after it had been cut in the past.

“After intense negotiations, a compromise was reached on the just demands of the prisoners and based on the agreement, the details of which will be disclosed later, the strike has ended,” Jamal Mheysen, a member of the central committee of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’s Fatah movement, said in Ramallah.

“Today, we declare the victory of the prisoners and the Palestinian people. We declare the triumph of the prisoners in their epic struggle and fight for freedom and dignity,” he added.

The strike was called by Fatah leader Marwan Barghouti, the most high-profile Palestinian jailed in Israel, to protest against solitary confinement and an Israeli practice of detention without trial that has been applied to thousands of prisoners since the 1980s.

Other demands included longer and more regular family visits, landlines installed in prisons and better healthcare.

There are currently 6,500 Palestinian political prisoners held by Israel, including more than 500 administrative detainees, according to Jerusalem-based prisoner rights group Addameer.

READ MORE: How my father survived a hunger strike in Israel

Palestinian activists hailed the deal as a victory for the hunger strikers.

“The Palestinian prisoners on hunger strike have prevailed,” the Free Marwan Barghouti campaign said in statement.

“This is an important step towards full respect of the rights of Palestinian prisoners under international law. It is also an indication of the reality of the Israeli occupation, which has left no option to Palestinian prisoners but to starve themselves to achieve basic rights they are entitled to under international law,” the statement added.

Barghouti was convicted for his involvement in the second Palestinian intifada, and sentenced in 2004 to five life terms.

Surveys show many Palestinians want him to be their next president.

Female Palestinian students stand during a protest against Israel near the illegal Jewish settlement of Beit Hagai, at the southern entrance to the occupied West Bank city of Hebron, on October 18, 2015. (Hazem Bader/AFP)

anonymous asked:

Isnt it true that in 1973, Egypt and Syria "invaded" their own territories? Everyone knows when talking about this war that the Sinai Peninsula, Golan Heights, West Bank, and Gaza Strip were being illegally occupied by Israel.

Israel won the war, so Israel got to keep the territory it won. Egypt made peace with Israel, Egypt got Sinai. Jordan occupied the “West Bank” from 1948 until Israel got it back, I don’t see anyone calling Jordan an illegal occupier?

Egypt and Syria invaded, there’s no air quotes, they invaded land that wasn’t theirs anymore. Kaliningrad! Look it up. 

Syria is never getting the Golan Back, Egypt didn’t want Gaza, and Jordan gave up its claim to Judea and Samaria in the late 1980′s. I hope the days of land for peace are over. They didn’t work out all that much the last time we did it (hint. Israel gave Gaza over to the Palestinians and got rockets and wannabe suicide bombers, thankfully the latter doesn’t happen anymore). 

Matt Taibbi Talks About Criminalized Poverty and Why Wall St. Is Above the Law

It’s not exactly breaking news that the American criminal justice system is wildly unfair. Thewar on drugs sends thousands of black and Hispanic kids to prison for using the same illegal substances that their white peers can more often get away with smoking or snorting; meanwhile, the Wall Street bankers responsible for the financial crisis get off with zero punishment and huge bonuses. These gross disparities in how the rich and poor are treated by the police and courts are the subject of The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gapa book illustrated by VICE columnist Molly Crabapple and written by Matt Taibbi, the former Rolling Stone investigative journalist who has made a career of lampooning our entitled upper class (and just left that magazine to start a new website about political corruption).

I called Taibbi to chat about how America got to this terrible, dystopian place and where we should go from here.

VICE: The core theme of the book is that we’ve seen two parallel, and very different, systems of criminal justice emerge in this country—one for the wealthy and powerful, another for the poor and brown. That concept in and of itself might not totally shock people, but the timeframe—just how novel that phenomenon is in our democracy—should, right?
Matt Taibbi:
 Obviously it’s not a new story that the rich get off and poor people get screwed. I think that’s a narrative that probably couldn’t be more obvious, but there are some new developments that have made this situation worse. There are these parallel policy and political developments that happened in the early 90s that mirrored each other, with the Democrats coming over on the issue of welfare reform and also deciding to follow the Republicans in terms of courting money from the financial services and hopping on board with deregulation. I think what both of those decisions meant was that, basically, poor people no longer had a lobby in Washington consistently, and the very wealthy now had a consensus behind them. So we started to have this phenomenon of much more aggressive law enforcement against the poor. On the other side, it begins with deregulation of white-collar commerce, and then it kind of ends in non-enforcement of white-collar crime. That also seems to be a political consensus. It’s not just the same old story that has gone back to the beginning of time… This is also a new political development that has to do with the alignment of the two political parties in this country and how they’ve changed recently.

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Donald Trump arrives in Bethlehem for talks with Abbas

Donald Trump has arrived in Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank to meet with Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas as the US president seeks to restart peace talks between the Israelis and Palestinians. The short visit in Bethlehem on Tuesday comes a day after Trump met Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, as Palestinians held a general strike in support of hundreds of hunger-striking prisoners held in Israeli jails. Meetings with Netanyahu concluded on Monday with Trump promising to help broker an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal, but gave little indication of how he could revive negotiations that collapsed in 2014. “It’s not easy. I have heard it is one of the toughest deals of all, but I have a feeling that we are going to get there eventually. I hope,” Trump said after the meeting, without elaborating. READ MORE: Palestinians on strike in solidarity with prisoners Al Jazeera’s Hoda Abdel-Hamid, reporting from Bethlehem, said Palestinian officials were not clear of Trump’s intentions during Tuesday’s visit. “They have told us they were listening, they were watching and they were trying to figure out whether Trump’s visit was another visit where he was seeking ideas or whether he was going to come up with his own ideas,” Abdel-Hamid said. The last round of peace talks, led by then-President Barack Obama and his secretary of state, John Kerry, fell apart in 2014. One point of contention is the fate of occupied East Jerusalem, which Israel captured in 1967. During his presidential campaign, Trump advocated breaking with decades of precedent and moving the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, deeply alarming Palestinians. He has since said the move was still being looked at. READ MORE: Palestinian basic rights ‘not on the agenda’ for Trump Diana Buttu, a Palestinian lawyer and former adviser to the Palestine Liberation Organisation, says Trump’s comments about striving for a negotiated solution between Israel and the Palestinians are not promising. “The time is now for the world to end Israel military rule,” she told Al Jazeera. “It’s not going to come through negations; it’s only going to come through exerted efforts to hold the Israelis accountable by boycotting through sanctions and bringing them before the international criminal courts.” “That Palestinians have to negotiate their freedom and prove ourselves worthy of freedom is repugnant,” Buttu added, arguing that Trump should use its multi-billion dollar financial support to Israel as weight to pressure it from ending its occupation of Palestinian territory. “I have very little faith that he will be able to do anything with the Israelis to change their policy,” she concluded. “I don’t anticipate anything positive is going to come out.”

'Day of rage’

The Palestinian prisoners’ affairs committee called for a “day of rage” on Monday for “the voice of the prisoners to be heard by the president”. Tuesday marks the 37th day of a mass hunger strike inside Israeli jails. Palestinian news agency Ma'an estimates that more than 1,300 Palestinians are currently on strike behind bars in Israeli prisons, while Israeli outlets have placed the number in the high hundreds. On Monday, Israeli forces shot and injured at least 11 Palestinian protesters who staged a general strike in the occupied West Bank, East Jerusalem, and the besieged Gaza Strip in support of those prisoners on hunger strikes. In Gaza, Hamas also organised a demonstration on Monday to denounce its labelling as a “terrorist” group by many Western governments, including the United States. After talks with Abbas, Trump will travel to Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem and give a speech at the Israel Museum.
Palestinians on strike in solidarity with prisoners

Israeli forces have shot and injured at least 11 Palestinian protesters who staged a general strike in the occupied West Bank, East Jerusalem, and the besieged Gaza Strip in support of hunger-striking Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails. Hundreds of protesters blocked roads in cities and towns of the West Bank on Monday. Stores and government offices closed down, public transportation ground to a halt and main thoroughfares in Palestinian cities were empty of people and cars. The Palestinian Ma'an News Agency said Israeli forces shot and injured the 11 Palestinian protesters during clashes in the West Bank. The Palestinian prisoners entered the 36th day of the mass hunger strike inside Israeli jails on Monday. Ma'an estimates that more than 1,300 Palestinians are currently on strike behind bars in Israeli prisons, while Israeli outlets have placed the number in the high hundreds. The Palestinian prisoners’ affairs committee also called for a “day of rage” on Tuesday, when Trump visits the West Bank, for “the voice of the prisoners to be heard by the president”. READ MORE: Palestinian basic rights ‘not on the agenda’ for Trump The hunger strike has been led by Marwan Barghouti, a senior leader in the Fatah faction imprisoned for 15 years, who said all other attempts to redress their concerns have failed. The hunger strikers’ demands include longer and more regular family visits, landlines installed in prisons and better healthcare for the roughly 6,500 Palestinians held in Israeli prisons. With rights groups and analysts arguing that Palestinian hunger strikers are entering a crucial stage, anger is growing in the streets. Farah Bayadsi, a lawyer at the West Bank-based prisoner advocacy group Addameer, said hunger strikers have been unable to directly meet with observers from the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC). Despite their declining health situations, many prisoners have been moved back and forth between different jails, Bayadsi told Al Jazeera. READ MORE: How Israel is targeting Palestinian institutions Alaa Tartir, programme director at Al-Shabaka: The Palestinian Policy Network, says Israeli authorities had hoped to break to the hunger strike before the US president’s visit. “One of Israel’s priorities now, as Trump’s visit looms, is to end this hunger strike and squash solidarity with the hunger strikers in the streets of the occupied West Bank,” he told Al Jazeera ahead of Trump’s arrival. “To achieve these goals, using violent measures and repressing techniques is the panacea for Israel.” Tartir added: “As hunger strike intensifies, Israel is becoming more concerned and nervous.” The Israeli Prison Service did not respond to Al Jazeera’s requests for comment.

Trump’s visit

The protests coincided with the current US President Donald Trump visit to Israel and occupied Palestinian territories. The strike has closed down Jerusalem’s Old City, where Trump will visit Christian and Jewish holy sites later on Monday. Trump opened his first visit to Israel on Monday, a two-day stop aimed at testing the waters for jumpstarting the dormant peace process. The last round of peace talks, led by then-President Barack Obama and his secretary of state, John Kerry, fell apart in 2014. One point of contention is the fate of east Jerusalem, which Israel captured in 1967. During his presidential campaign, Trump advocated breaking with decades of precedent and moving the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, deeply alarming Palestinians. He has since said the move was still being looked at. Diana Buttu, a Palestinian lawyer and former adviser to the Palestine Liberation Organisation, says Trump’s comments about striving for a negotiated solution between Israel and the Palestinians are not promising. “The time is now for the world to end Israel military rule,” she told Al Jazeera. “It’s not going to come through negations; it’s only going to come through exerted efforts to hold the Israelis accountable by boycotting through sanctions and bringing them before the international criminal courts.” OPINION: Palestinians expect nothing good from Trump “That Palestinians have to negotiate their freedom and prove ourselves worthy of freedom is repugnant,” Buttu added, arguing that Trump should use its multi-billion dollar financial support to Israel as weight to pressure it from ending its occupation of Palestinian territory. “I have very little faith that he will be able to do anything with the Israelis to change their policy,” she concluded. “I don’t anticipate anything positive is going to come out.”

Palestinian students pray in a classroom in the occupied West Bank city of Hebron on October 19, 2015 next to an empty chair of their former classmate 16-year-old Bayan al-Osaily (portrait) covered in a traditional Palestinian keffiyeh scarf, who was killed by an Israeli soldier. 

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Living Under Occupation,

Old Palestinian lady arrives home to find Jewish settlers have stolen and took over her house

Twenty settlers (with sleeping bags), accompanied by private armed security and backed by Israeli police forces, entered an extension of the Palestinian house, and started clearing it of the family’s belongings.

One Palestinian resident, Khamis al-Gawi, has been arrested shortly after the settlers arrived, and is still being held at a local police station. Two international activists, American and Swedish nationals, who were filming the settlers taking over the house were also arrested by the police and their video cameras confiscated.