March 14, 1974: Baffled, hat-donning stockbrokers struggled to make sense of stock numbers which gave conflicting signals: “The market seemed to be waiting to learn exactly what took place at the meeting of Arab oil ministers in Libya. It has generally gained for more than a month in anticipation of an end to the oil embargo. Now the situation still seems confused,” reported The Times. Photo: Tyrone Dukes/The New York Times

Why Won’t Hollywood Cast Asian Actors?
Economics has nothing to do with racist casting policies.
By Keith Chow

“If minorities are box office risks, what accounts for the success of the “Fast and Furious” franchise, which presented a broadly diverse team, behind and in front of the camera? Over seven movies it has grossed nearly $4 billion worldwide. In fact, a recent study by the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, found that films with diverse leads not only resulted in higher box office numbers but also higher returns of investment for studios and producers.”


Lawrence O'Donnell Rips New York Times’ Lazy Crime Report.

Just watch Lawrence do work on NY Times regarding Mike Brown. GOAT.

My eyebrows, which I’ve never taken much notice of in my life before, Steven’s decided are the most amazing comic devices. Now in the scripts, as a stage direction, instead of saying, “The Doctor looks peeved” or “The Doctor looks annoyed,” they just write, “Eyebrows.” I’m supposed to do something with my eyebrows.

For $10, New York City Students See ‘Hamilton’ and Rap for Lin-Manuel Miranda (NYT)

The 1,300 students who saw “Hamilton” on Wednesday, most of them 11th graders enrolled in classes about American history, are the first of 20,000 who are to see the musical under a program sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation. The program, which focuses on students in schools with high percentages of low-income families, is intended to make it possible for younger and more diverse audiences to see a show for which tickets have become hugely expensive and difficult to obtain.

“I hope I can be inspired and motivated,” Yeliz Sezgin, a 15-year-old junior at Fort Hamilton High School in Brooklyn, said as the daylong events, which included a question-and-answer session with the cast, began. Ms. Sezgin designed a T-shirt for the 159 Fort Hamilton students, with her school’s mascot, a tiger, posed with the upstretched arm of the musical’s logo.Photo 

In preparing to attend the show, Ms. Sezgin and her classmates had read love letters between Alexander and his wife, Eliza, and she compared them to text messages; she said she was also impressed by the realization that Mr. Miranda spent years developing the musical: “He didn’t know what this would be, and yet he kept at it.”

After seeing the show, some students said they were especially struck by the cast, which features Hispanic and black actors playing the founding fathers. “I was thinking about the diversity while I was watching it, with all this controversy in the entertainment industry,” said Amber Montalvo, a 17-year-old student at the High School for Media and Communications in Manhattan. “It’s inspiring.”

Kaye Houlihan, the principal of Fort Hamilton, said her school had an annual unit on Hamilton, because of its name, but had intensified its study in anticipation of seeing the show. She said the exercise of asking students to produce skits — of two minutes or less related to the history — had prompted various takes on the material, including girls exploring neglected women of the era.

Some students said reading the history had made them more curious to understand how the musical was conceived. “I want to know why Burr killed Hamilton,” said Raekwon Edwards, a 17-year-old junior at Bronx Engineering and Technology Academy. His schoolmate Valentin Dinaj, 16, said, “I want to see how they bring history alive.

The students were, not surprisingly, an extraordinarily enthusiastic audience. They shouted “I love you” at Mr. Miranda. They cheered for belted notes, laughed at sexual innuendo, cheered trash talk (“Daddy’s calling!,” a dig at Hamilton’s dependence on President Washington, and “We know who’s really doing the planting,” a jab at the South’s dependence on slavery, drew particularly loud reactions) and gasped at the shooting death of Hamilton’s son Philip.

Two of the cast members who addressed the students, Mr. Miranda and Anthony Ramos, are alumni of the New York public schools. Mr. Ramos said that by participating in school musicals, as well as sports, he was able to “find that part of me that I didn’t even know I had.” And he urged the school officials present to do more for arts education. “The public school system has neglected the arts a little bit,” Mr. Ramos said. “Y’all think you don’t have the money — you better find it.” 


Jan. 10, 1977: Dorothy Hamil, Olympic gold medalist, rehearsed for the year’s Ice Capades at Madison Square Garden, which received a mixed review from The Times. “Dorothy Hamill’s first number,” wrote Richard Eder, “was ice skating with no adornment other than itself. As she surged around, impaling and corkscrewing on her own movements, it was like one clear voice coming out of a tumult.“ Photo: Tyrone Dukes/The New York Times

An unapologetic feminist, Maslany is frequently hailed as a purveyor of Strong Female Characters. Though appreciative, Maslany finds this a reductive formulation. “That’s so boring!” she said, and went on to condemn the way female strength gets shoehorned into the confines of male-dominated narratives. “What about the strength of this uncharted territory we’ve never explored on camera? We haven’t seen them yet, they’re not archetypes yet, because they’re all related to male expression.”