nypd news

The NYPD got braggy over a $100 drug bust.

Are you afraid of this gang?

That’s a smooth $100 in cash and – since I don’t buy weed and I’m That Dude who only smokes everybody elses – I have no idea how much herb this is but it definitely ain’t enough for me to be like OMG Thank you NYPD for keeping our streets safe.

I wouldn’t be surprised in the least if I knew at least seven people right this moment holding this much green on them because they were either about to sell it or just bought it.  I live near Columbia University okay?  Them Connors and Bradleys stay having backpacks of marijuana parceled out for sale in various sizes.

But it’s gang members with this Mary so I should be thankful.  Gangs are bad.  Gangs dealing drugs are bad.  Gangs are not shooting each other up over marijuana.  That’s just so not part of the game.  

Nothing about me feels like Queens just got safer because of this lil moment of grandstanding and if the NYPD really wants me to be all “wow, our brave officers, cleaning up the streets” they’ll tweet out pics of cops arresting their own for planting drugs and beating up on suspects.  Then I’ll feel safer.  Some dude on his way to get the party started or hustle to make rent is not threatening my quality of life in the least.

R.I.P. Miosotis Familia of the NYPD, a 12 year veteran and mother of three who was shot and killed while on duty this morning in the Bronx. There are no words to describe this heinous act of violence, there simply are none. Godspeed Officer Familia, thank you for your service and sacrifice. My heart goes out to her family and all her brothers and sisters with the NYPD.

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“I’m obviously talking about specific cases where it is murder, as far as I’m concerned.”

After Quentin Tarantino’s appearance at an anti-police brutality rally earlier this month, police labeled the director as cop-hating, and the NYPD and LAPD reacted by calling for a boycott of his films. Tarantino took to Real Time with Bill Maher on Sunday to defend his claims, citing that he is not anti-police but the largest problem within the institution needs to be discussed, rather than avoided by police defending themselves over the citizens they pledge to protect when becoming officers of the law. [x]

NYPD officer pictured ‘putting seven-months pregnant woman into a chokehold for illegally grilling outside her apartment’

An advocacy group has released images which claim to show an NYPD officer putting a seven-months pregnant woman into a chokehold for illegally grilling on the sidewalk in front of her apartment. 

NYPD officers have been banned from using the chokehold since 1993, but an officer can be seen in the pictures wrapping his arm around 27-year-old Rosan Miller’s neck in the Saturday incident. 

Her young daughter is also in the pictures, watching the arrest unfold.

Illegally grilling on the sidewalk! What a hardened, dangerous criminal! And I bet that little girl now has a very solid grasp on who she can trust and what’s ok to do to women and/or people who are physically weaker than you!

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By Ned Leeds

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the Lizard’s attack on Manhattan and the death of Captain George Stacy, of New York City Police Department’s Major Crimes Unit. Stacy was a decorated police veteran who left behind a loving wife and four children. In this Daily Bugle exclusive we spoke with the Stacy family, Helen, who lost a heroic husband that day, and Gwen, Phillip, Howard, and Simon, who lost their father.

Daily Bugle: Helen, is this a hard anniversary to commemorate?

Helen Stacy: It’s hard to believe George died a year ago. That night, that call, it still hurts as if it happened five seconds ago.

DB: Does your family take any solace that Curt Connors will spend the rest of his life in prison?

Helen Stacy: I think that would have mattered much more to George, just to know Connors is paying for his crimes. He cared very deeply about the law and about justice.

DB: Gwen, your graduation from Midtown Science High School is coming up and you are the valedictorian. How proud would your father have been?

Gwen Stacy: Very proud, I’m sure. (fighting back tears) And nervous for me, and concerned because he wouldn’t want me to be scared. And excited for my future. 

DB: Do you ever have any regrets that Spider-Man and your father saved the city but only one of them walked away that night?

Gwen Stacy: I think… (long pause) I think both of them did what they thought needed to be done without regard to the risk. I think both of them were heroes that night. I regret that my dad died, but not at the expense of anyone else.

DB: What about the kids? What do your classmates say about that night?

Simon Stacy: All my friends think that Spidey was totally cool, but that my dad was the coolest!

Imagine that Eric Garner had been white. Imagine that he’d been living in Idaho. Imagine that the law-enforcement officers who killed him had been federal agents.

His death would be a Tea Party crusade.

Think about it. The police hassled Garner because he had a history of selling untaxed cigarettes. It’s the kind of big-government intrusion that drives Tea Partiers nuts. One of the events that helped launch the Tea Party, in fact, came in January 2009, when activists from Young Americans for Liberty donned American Indian garb to protest the soda taxes proposed by then-New York Governor David Patterson.

Garner responded to being hassled with a statement of “don’t tread on me” anti-government defiance: “I was just minding my own business. Every time you see me you want to mess with me. I’m tired of it. It stops today!”

A tussle ensued. The police put Garner in a chokehold, and he died.

The Garner case bears some resemblance to that of Cliven Bundy, the Nevada rancher who this spring prevented Bureau of Land Management agents from impounding his cattle after he refused to pay government grazing fees. Like Garner, Bundy was engaged in a form of commerce he believed the government should not tax. Like Garner, Bundy resisted law enforcement’s efforts to punish him for it. For many conservatives, this made Bundy a hero and the government that sought to penalize him a tyranny. Right-wing activists, including some Republican legislators, flocked to Bundy’s ranch as he stared down federal agents, and Nevada Senator Dean Heller dubbed these vigilantes “patriots.” “At the heart of this issue,” declared Fox’s Sean Hannity, is “my belief that our government is simply out of control.” Ted Cruz called the Bundy affair “the unfortunate and tragic culmination of the path that President Obama has set the federal government on” in which “we have seen our constitutional liberties eroded.”

To imagine how Fox News would be reacting right now had Garner been white, rural, and facing the feds, you need only imagine how it would have reacted had a BLM agent shot Bundy dead.

But Fox and the rest of the pro-Tea Party right aren’t reacting that way. Yes, some conservative pundits—noting the video that shows Garner being choked to death—have condemned the grand jury’s decision not to indict the police officer who killed him. Rand Paul has denounced the high cigarette taxes that Garner flouted.

Overall, however, conservatives have responded to the Garner case with a yawn.

—  The Atlantic, “If Eric Garner Were White”

Off duty, black cops in New York feel threat from fellow police
December 24, 2014

From the dingy donut shops of Manhattan to the cloistered police watering holes in Brooklyn, a number of black NYPD officers say they have experienced the same racial profiling that cost Eric Garner his life.

Garner, a 43-year-old black man suspected of illegally peddling loose cigarettes, died in July after a white officer put him in a chokehold. His death, and that of an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, has sparked a slew of nationwide protests against police tactics. On Saturday, those tensions escalated after a black gunman, who wrote of avenging the black deaths on social media, shot dead two New York policemen.  

The protests and the ambush of the uniformed officers pose a major challenge for New York Mayor Bill De Blasio. The mayor must try to ease damaged relations with a police force that feels he hasn’t fully supported them, while at the same time bridging a chasm with communities who say the police unfairly target them.

What’s emerging now is that, within the thin blue line of the NYPD, there is another divide - between black and white officers.

Reuters interviewed 25 African American male officers on the NYPD, 15 of whom are retired and 10 of whom are still serving. All but one said that, when off duty and out of uniform, they had been victims of racial profiling, which refers to using race or ethnicity as grounds for suspecting someone of having committed a crime.

The officers said this included being pulled over for no reason, having their heads slammed against their cars, getting guns brandished in their faces, being thrown into prison vans and experiencing stop and frisks while shopping. The majority of the officers said they had been pulled over multiple times while driving. Five had had guns pulled on them.

Desmond Blaize, who retired two years ago as a sergeant in the 41st Precinct in the Bronx, said he once got stopped while taking a jog through Brooklyn’s upmarket Prospect Park. “I had my ID on me so it didn’t escalate,” said Blaize, who has sued the department alleging he was racially harassed on the job. “But what’s suspicious about a jogger? In jogging clothes?”

The NYPD and the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, the police officers’ union, declined requests for comment. However, defenders of the NYPD credit its policing methods with transforming New York from the former murder capital of the world into the safest big city in the United States.

EX-POLICE CHIEF SKEPTICAL

“It makes good headlines to say this is occurring, but I don’t think you can validate it until you look into the circumstances they were stopped in,” said Bernard Parks, the former chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, who is African American.

“Now if you want to get into the essence of why certain groups are stopped more than others, then you only need to go to the crime reports and see which ethnic groups are listed more as suspects. That’s the crime data the officers are living with.”

Blacks made up 73 percent of the shooting perpetrators in New York in 2011 and were 23 percent of the population.

A number of academics believe those statistics are potentially skewed because police over-focus on black communities, while ignoring crime in other areas. They also note that being stopped as a suspect does not automatically equate to criminality. Nearly 90 percent of blacks stopped by the NYPD, for example, are found not to be engaged in any crime.

The black officers interviewed said they had been racially profiled by white officers exclusively, and about one third said they made some form of complaint to a supervisor.

All but one said their supervisors either dismissed the complaints or retaliated against them by denying them overtime, choice assignments, or promotions. The remaining officers who made no complaints said they refrained from doing so either because they feared retribution or because they saw racial profiling as part of the system.

In declining to comment to Reuters, the NYPD did not respond to a specific request for data showing the racial breakdown of officers who made complaints and how such cases were handled.

White officers were not the only ones accused of wrongdoing. Civilian complaints against police officers are in direct proportion to their demographic makeup on the force, according to the NYPD’s Civilian Complaint Review Board.

Indeed, some of the officers Reuters interviewed acknowledged that they themselves had been defendants in lawsuits, with allegations ranging from making a false arrest to use of excessive force. Such claims against police are not uncommon in New York, say veterans.

Full article

The recent brutal murder of two Brooklyn police officers, Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, is a national tragedy that should inspire nationwide mourning. Both my grandfather and father were police officers, so I appreciate what a difficult and dangerous profession law enforcement is. We need to value and celebrate the many officers dedicated to protecting the public and nourishing our justice system. It’s a job most of us don’t have the courage to do.

At the same time, however, we need to understand that their deaths are in no way related to the massive protests against systemic abuses of the justice system as symbolized by the recent deaths—also national tragedies—of Eric Garner, Akai Gurley, and Michael Brown. Ismaaiyl Brinsley, the suicidal killer, wasn’t an impassioned activist expressing political frustration, he was a troubled man who had shot his girlfriend earlier that same day. He even Instagrammed warnings of his violent intentions. None of this is the behavior of a sane man or rational activist. The protests are no more to blame for his actions than The Catcher in the Rye was for the murder of John Lennon or the movie Taxi Driver for the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan. Crazy has its own twisted logic and it is in no way related to the rational cause-and-effect world the rest of us attempt to create.

Those who are trying to connect the murders of the officers with the thousands of articulate and peaceful protestors across America are being deliberately misleading in a cynical and selfish effort to turn public sentiment against the protestors. This is the same strategy used when trying to lump in the violence and looting with the legitimate protestors, who have disavowed that behavior. They hope to misdirect public attention and emotion in order to stop the protests and the progressive changes that have already resulted. Shaming and blaming is a lot easier than addressing legitimate claims.

—  KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR, writing in Time magazine, “The Police Aren’t Under Attack.  Institutionalized Racism Is.”