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BEEF 101

Besides the cooking demos and endless amounts of food and drink to be had… the Grand Tasting also had learning booths.  I happened to stop by this one:  Beef 101 with Phil Bass, PhD, Meat Scientist and Chef Michael Ollier.  

Wait… ummm….  what?!

Yes… MEAT SCIENTIST!!!

The audience asked a bunch of questions and these guys basically spoke and cooked some knowledge to us.  From how to cut a piece of beef, what and what not to do when handling meat, how much time it takes to cook different parts and even how much time you have to wait after you take it off the grill and before you devour it.  Sooo many little things that one doesn’t even think matters but really… it does! 

Damn… raw meat!

Did you know...? History of pizza!

History of Pizza
The history of eating flat bread is as ancient as agriculture itself. However, the modern age of pizza can be traced back to the late 19th Century in Naples, Italy.

In June, 1889, Umberto I (1844-1900), King of Italy, and his wife, Queen Margherita di Savoia (1851-1926), were in Naples on holiday, and called to their palace the most popular of the pizzaioli, Raffaele Esposito, to taste his specialties. He prepared three kinds of pizzas, one of which was made with mozzarella, basil, and tomatoes—representing the colors of the Italian flag. Raffaele Esposito dedicated this particular pizza to the Queen and called it “La Margherita.” This pizza set the standard by which today’s pizza evolved as well as firmly established Naples as the pizza capitol of the world.

It should be no surprise then, that it was Italian immigrants who brought pizza to America. The first American pizzeria was opened in 1905. It was some time, however, before the rest of America would learn to love pizza. It was confined almost entirely to Italian neighborhoods until World War II. As our troops conquered Italy, they started to get a taste for pizza. They brought this back with them when they returned from war and the pizza legacy was forever solidified. From that point on, pizza has been an ever-growing part of the American cuisine and culture, with pizza places popping up in all parts of country. This remains amazing given our propensity for fast food throughout the years and our newfound health food kick of today. Pizza remains strong despite these outside influences.

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