nyc arts artists

I channeled some of my rage and despair into this piece today, it helped a little. To all my sisters marching tomorrow, stay safe, be aware of your surroundings but most importantly, show them that we will not be stopped, we will not conform. This battle rages on. Stay Angry, my friends.



EDIT: by popular demand, I made this illustration available as a print and other merchandise, if you’re interested please visit my soc6 page right over >>>> here <<<< thank you for all the love and support. And to all of you that are marching today with me, say it loud sisters, stay strong and stay safe!! <3

Looking back

“If I could tell a 15‑year‑old self something, it’d be to try not to care about your appearance. Besides that, I think to always hold on to that sense of childhood wonder, that excitement. I always try to make sure I remember to put that back into my work, to remember that from doing it because I love it, and it’s not just a job, and doing it for play. As an artist, I think it’s incredibly important to hold on to the fearlessness that you have as a child. It helps you take risks in your art.”

In honor of International Women’s Day this week, we are posting quotes from our latest Creative New York interview with Petra Collins, highlighting important issues relating to body image, openness and collaboration, and health care access as an artist. Read the entire interview at nyc.moma.org.

Join us on 3/18 for PopRally’s Petra Collins: In Search of Us, an evening of performance, music, and digital art conceived and developed by Collins and artist Madelyne Beckles. Tickets and more info at mo.ma/poprallyxpetra

[Portrait of Petra Collins by Nguan]

Madonna, a former lover of Jean-Michel Basquiat tells her story

I am not sure if I met Jean-Michel in an art gallery or a night-club, but in those days you couldn’t tell the difference.

He had the presence of a movie star and I was crazy about him. He carried crumpled wads of money in the pockets of his paint-splattered Armani suits. Money he felt guilty about having. Money he always gave away to less fortunate friends.

I remember Jean-Michel’s tag - Samo- which was accompanied with a little crown and I remember thinking he was a genius. He was. But he wasn’t very comfortable with it.

I remember all the girls were in love with him and one night I looked out of his loft window and saw a girl whose heart he had broken, burning his paintings in a big bonfire. I wanted to stop her and rescue his paintings, but he didn’t seem to mind. He said it was their fate.

I remember him getting up at 3am and sleep-walking to an empty canvas. He stood inches away from it and proceeded to paint the most minuscule figures and what he did was so beautiful and intellectual and I stood watching him with dumbfounded amazement

He was one of the people I was truly envious of. But he didn’t know how good he was and was plagued with insecurities. He used to say he was jealous of me because music is more accessible and it reached more people. He loathed the idea that art was appreciated by an elite group.

When I broke up with him he demanded I give back the paintings he had given me. Not because he didn’t think I deserved them, but because he was obsessed with the idea that I would sell them.

He was so paranoid. of course, I was heart-broken but complied. Now I couldn’t buy one of his paintings if I wanted to.

When I heard that Jean-Michel had died I was not surprised. He was too fragile for this world.

I remember one summer having dinner with Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Jean-Michel at Mr Chow’s and feeling like the luckiest girl in the world to have known him. To have known all of them. Now they’re all gone.

(Source:  New Straits Times - 2 June 1996)

“This series of animations was inspired by finding solace in celebrating traditionally dismissed feminine objects, the act of creating a world that mirrors my desires, and Eiichi Yamamoto’s dark psychedelic fantasy tale ‘Belladonna of Sadness’ (1973).”  - Grace Miceli

For PopRally Presents Petra Collins: In Search of Us, artists Madelyne Beckles, Aleia Murawski, and Grace Miceli have created a series of original, short artist videos, conceived with Petra Collins, that re-examine the canonical representation of the female body. This contemporary take on the 19th-century Salon des Indépendants has been released over the course of the week on our Instagram account, in advance of Saturday’s PopRally event, where a site-specific, live tableau will confront these very notions IRL. The event is sold out, but tune in to Instagram on Saturday night for live posts from the event. More information at mo.ma/PopRallyxPetra