nurtition

Here are 10 foods to avoid — and suggestions for healthier substitutions:
  1. Sugary drinks. This means soda pop, sweetened tea and fruit-flavored punch drinks. Each 12-ounce can of pop has about 7 teaspoons of sugar and about 140 calories. Drink water instead.
  2. Processed lunch meats. And this includes sausages, hot dogs and bacon. They’re high in fat and sodium — even those that say “lower” or “reduced.” Instead cook a little extra meat, chicken or fish to use in sandwiches.
  3. White bread. Choose whole grain for more fiber. Don’t be fooled by the color of the bread — it has nothing to do with it being whole grain. Look for the term “whole” on the label.
  4. Whole milk. Skip dairy products with “whole” on the packages. Look for “low-fat” instead.
  5. Canned or instant soup. They’re pricey and loaded with salt — even the lower sodium versions. Make your own.
  6. Junk food snacks. Chips, crackers and “doodles.” If they’re in your kitchen they’ll end up in your mouth. They may be labeled “low-fat” or “trans fat-free,” but they still have plenty of salt and calories. Think fruit and veggies for snacks.
  7. Stick spreads. Butter and margarine in stick form are saturated fats — and stick margarine can have trans fat. Try trans-fat free tub spreads. Or better yet break the spread habit.
  8. White rice. Go for brown or wild rice. Replacing white rice with brown rice or other whole grains, such as whole wheat and barley, can lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.
  9. Yogurt — unless it’s plain. Avoid ones that are loaded with fat and sugar. Choose plain, low-fat yogurt and add your own fruit.
  10. Processed cheese. “Cheese food,” “cheese spread” and “cheese product” usually mean lots of fat and salt — and in some instances no cheese! Go for the real thing, but remember that moderation is key.

By Jennifer Nelson, M.S., R.D. and Katherine Zeratsky, R.D.

www.mayoclinic.com/health/foods-to-avoid/MY01372

“For Health…eat some food from each group…every day!”, 1941 - 1945 by The U.S. National Archives on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Original Caption: “For Health…eat some food from each group…every day!”, 1941 - 1945

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 44-PA-798B

From:: Series: World War II Posters, compiled 1942 - 1945

Created By:: Office for Emergency Management. Office of War Information. Domestic Operations Branch. Bureau of Special Services. (03/09/1943 - 09/15/1945)

Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=514288

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, National Archives at College Park,MD

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Buy copies of selected National Archives photographs and documents at the National Archives Print Shop online: gallery.pictopia.com/natf/photo/

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Firstly, I would like to explain the above as some people seem to be misinterpreting the post - If you weigh 128 pounds, the recommended water consumption is half of that in OUNCES, so 128/2 = 64 ounces (the equivalent of 8 cups) of water.  

Secondly, I want to apologize, my last “water” post had a typo in it. It originally read, “Drink half of your body weight in water everyday!”. It was brought to my attention by a fellow Tumblr dweller. I have since deleted that post as I don’t want anyone to get the wrong impression and drink way too much water. I do sincerely apologize for my oversight. 

Additionally, I wasn’t attempting to use “scare tactics” as the same blogger suggested. I was merely illustrating how many calories are being wasted on a beverage that doesn’t provide any nutritional value. The goal is nutrition and fitness for this blog. Soda consumption has been linked to kidney disease (Andrew Bomback et al 2010 in the scientific journal ’Kidney International’), the obesity epidemic (George Bray et al 2004 in the scientific journal ’The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’), strokes in both men and women (Adam Bernstein et al 2012 in ’The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’), and the list goes on and on. If health is a priority, drinking soda should not be. 

If anyone would like to read these articles for themselves, I have posted the citations in parenthesis above, with that information you can find the referenced article. 

youtube

Think dancers don’t eat? 

Think again >> 

Did you know apples and cinnamon boost your metabolism? Try this Metabolism Boosting Detox drink. Drink nothing but this until Friday, and lots of it. You will have more energy, your skin and hair will glow and you will look fabulous in your going out clothes come Friday night! 

This recipe makes one big pitcher, re-fill water 3-4 times before replacing apples and cinnamon-

1 Apple thinly sliced, I like Fugi but pick your favorite

1 Cinnamon Stick

Drop apple slices in the bottom of the pitcher (save a few to drop in your glass later) and then the cinnamon stick, cover with ice about ½ way through then with water. Place in the fridge for 10 minutes before serving.

Nutritional Info:
Calories: 0
Fat: 0
Fiber: 0
Carbs: 0
Protein: 0

Sample Diet for a Pregnant Woman

Here’s an example of a daily menu, with a few extra snack suggestions to boost your calcium intake.      

         

Breakfast
½ cup cantaloupe
2 eggs scrambled with ¼ cup mushrooms and bell pepper, using 1 teaspoon canola oil
1 slice of whole grain toast 
1 cup low-fat milk

Snack
1 large apple
¼ cup almonds

Lunch
1 medium baked potato topped with ¾ cup chili with beans and 2 tablespoons grated low-fat cheddar cheese
1 cup spinach salad with 1 tablespoon dried cranberries and 2 tablespoons light salad dressing
5 whole grain crackers
1 cup low-fat milk

Snack
½ cup baby carrots with 1 tablespoon of light ranch dressing
2 cups light popcorn (includes 1 teaspoon oil)

Dinner
Half a sliced tomato and ¼ of an avocado, sliced
4 ounces grilled salmon
1 cup cooked brown rice or quinoa
½ cup green beans, cooked
1 multi-grain roll

Snack
8 ounces low-fat vanilla yogurt
2 graham crackers

Garden Reflection II: What is one cool thing you learned about nutrition or gardening this year?

TAH-JANAI
An interesting fact I learned is that organic farmers don’t use chemical for the soil.

HERMINO
An interesting fact I learned is natural grown foods are healthier than the chemical infused one, because the chemicals take away a lot of the nutrients.

ARISSA
One interesting thing I learned this year in garden is that organic farming guarantees our food is free of harmful chemicals (=

SHAWN
Most of our nutrition comes from vitamins and minerals. We have to make healthy choices.

ANGEL
Plants grow in live areas like live trees and live garden and the ground.

ANIYAH
I learned that producers are farmers, animals, factories, and grocery stores.

SHERMIRAH
There is a lot of uniqueness and access to nutrition.

UNAYSAH
The one cool thing that happened this year. Planting soil in the garden and learning about what places some food goes.

HAKI
One interesting thing I learned is that organic farming does not put any harmful chemicals into plants so that the plants grow naturally.

LEIGHASIA
One thing cool I learned about gardening and nutrition is the nutrient cycle.

TY-JAE
One cool garden fact that I learned is that a tomato is a fruit.

KAYLA
One cool fact I learned was that mushrooms are a fungi.

JANIAYAH
One cool garden face I learned this year is that worms richen the soil.

MYASIA
One is that the practice of farming used natural inputs and pest control.

AMIRRI
This year I learned that helping out in the garden is helpful for the animals and US.

BREANNA
One thing I learned was to be respectful.