The Radioactive Man Who Returned To Fukushima To Feed The Animals That Everyone Else Left Behind

Naoto Matsumura is the only human brave enough to live in Fukushima’s 12.5-mile exclusion zone

He fled at first but returned to take care of the animals that were left behind

He returned for his own animals at first, but realized that so many more needed his help, too

Matsumura, who is 55 years old, knows that the radiation is harmful, but he “refuses to worry about it”


“They also told me that I wouldn’t get sick for 30 or 40 years. I’ll most likely be dead by then anyway, so I couldn’t care less”


Matsumura discovered that thousands of cows had died locked in barns


He also freed many animals that had been left chained up by their owners


Many of them now rely on him for food

The government has forbidden him from staying, but that doesn’t stop him either


He started in 2011 and is still going strong 4 years later


He relies solely on donations from supporters to work with and feed the animals


His supporters are calling him the ‘guardian of Fukushima’s animals’


The man clearly has a sense of humor as well

The untold human suffering and property damage left in the wake of the Fukushima disaster in Japan has been well-documented, but there’s another population that suffered greatly that few have discussed – the animals left behind in the radioactive exclusion zone. One man, however, hasn’t forgotten – 55-year-old Naoto Matsumura, a former construction worker who lives in the zone to care for its four-legged survivors.He is known as the ‘guardian of Fukushima’s animals’ because of the work he does to feed the animals left behind by people in their rush to evacuate the government’s 12.5-mile exclusion zone. He is aware of the radiation he is subject to on a daily basis, but says that he “refuses to worry about it.” He does take steps, however, by only eating food imported into the zone.

by Dovas

I’m so moved by this man’s bravery, selflessness and compassion. What a beautiful person.

The Fallout Series

Fallout- “Help, we need water!”

Fallout 2- “Help we need plants!”

Fallout 3- “Have you seen my dad?”

Fallout: New Vegas- You’re the immortal mailman, you get shot in the face by Chandler from “Friends”, go kill him

Fallout 4- That video of the “Heavy Rain” glitch where the guy yells “SHAAAAAUUUNN” for 20 minutes straight

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April 26th 1986: Chernobyl nuclear disaster

On this day in 1986, a reactor exploded at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in Ukraine, creating the world’s worst nuclear disaster. Radioactive smoke was let into the atmosphere which spread across the Soviet Union and Europe. Thirty-one members of staff and emergency workers died directly due to the accident, but many others died from diseases - often cancer - resulting from exposure to radiation. Hundreds of thousands of people eventually had to be evacuated and resettled due to contamination of areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. The disaster raised questions of the safety of nuclear power and encouraged the Soviet government to become more open. Only two nuclear accidents have been classified as level seven on the International Nuclear Event Scale - Chernobyl and the Fukushima Daiichi disaster of 2011.

“For the first time ever, we have confronted in reality the sinister power of uncontrolled nuclear energy.”
- Mikhail Gorbachev

30 years ago today

On September 18th, 1980, Americans came very close to nuclear disaster. During maintenance on a Titan II missile in an Arkansas silo, an airman dropped a wrench, which plummeted 70 feet and punctured the missile, spraying rocket fuel everywhere. The incident was quickly covered up, but had the bomb exploded, millions would have been killed or irradiated. Source

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Fukushima exclusion zone looks like a post-apocalyptic wilderness

Four years have passed since the devastating Fukushima nuclear leakage accident, yet only 40,000 of the 160,000 people displaced from the 12.5-mile exclusion zone surrounding the nuclear power plant were able to return, as many areas are still considered to be too dangerous to enter.

The exclusion zone today looks like a forgotten, ghost town, with tons of contaminated soil lying untouched and hundreds of abandoned vehicles and homes engulfed by an overgrown forest.

Polish photographer Arkadiusz Podniesinski’s stunning photo project has captured haunting scenes from the zone, offering an insight into how an area devastated and abandoned by man can be reclaimed by nature.