now you see me movie review

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

Beauty and the Beast (Remake) Review

This is going to be a spoiler free review, so I won’t be able to go into too much detail, but let me give you a short preview of what I feel about the movie: It was utterly and undeniably magical!

I just left the cinema and instantly made my way home and to my laptop to write all this down so I would not forget a single thing I wanted to share with you guys, because let me tell you there is so much to say about this movie and all of it is good. Over the past couple of weeks I have seen so much negativity surround this movie, so many people threatening to boycott yet another movie they haven’t seen on the sheer basis that a character was supposedly gay and once more mistreated for it.

I write this to share with everyone willing to read just what an amazing experience it was watching this movie. I want to preface the following review by saying that both my best friend and I are not overly emotional people. Neither of us cry at the drop of a pin, especially not in the cinema. Yet in the matter of ten minutes both me and my friend had our first tears in our eyes. I say first, because the movie takes you on quite the emotional ride and it is magnificent. Now, I’m no professional, but I’d consider my opinion rather objective and trustworthy. Of course, I’d suggest you go see the movie yourself nevertheless.

Let me begin with the basics such as scenery, music and cast. The scenery was quite literally breathtaking. The second Emma Watson stepped out of her little home in that little village of France you are there with Belle. I had the pleasure to watch the movie in 3D IMAX and it was absolutely worth it. I’d recommend for anyone to pay those extra bucks, because I feel it really added to the tone of the movie.

While the CGI was certainly visible at times and slightly over the top for my taste here and there the overall feel of the movie is not damaged by it at all. Wherever the movie takes you, it seems real despite of it. The camera work is to thank for it as well, as it really helps to set a specific tone. All in all the movie does great in making you feel a certain emotion at the appropriate time by using all the means they are given to do so; including the sets and the way the camera is handled.

The music and especially the musical numbers were quite mesmerizing. Amongst the familiar classics like Beauty and the Beast itself the movie offered some new pieces as well. Especially one towards the end – sung by Dan Stevens as the Beast – caught my attention and heart in particular. They use the songs not only to entertain, but also to convey emotions and a deep insight into the characters themselves. Some performances I liked better than others – I was disappointed by the audible autotune used on Emma Watson herself – but overall the numbers were all equally entertaining.

As for the cast I have to admit I had my doubts. I was especially worried about Josh Gad as Le Fou as I’ve gotten to know him as a pretty poor comedic actor. I say poor as most jokes are at the expense of him and his weight rather than made by him. After watching the movie I can say that I could not be more pleased with the casting, even Josh Gad. I was honestly surprised as to how well he handled the role and happy to see him take on a more serious side. Of course he was still funny, but this time the humour wasn’t at his expense, but rather due to his wit and clever sarcasm.

Now I want to tackle the characters, specifically taking the accusations into account, and talk about how the movie performs in comparison to the old classic we all know and love. While a lot of the original story has remained untouched and recognizable, there still have been quite a few tweaks and they were for the better. They made the story more understandable, the characters more memorable and real. I am happy to note that the characters are granted a new depth they were lacking in the original. Thanks to that the story is much better fitting for our time, age and new audience.

Gaston I was especially pleased with, for multiple reasons. Towards the beginning of the movie I found him to be rather charming which was a clever move to make. It only made him seem worse when finally his facade dropped later on the movie. It makes you truly detest his character and therefor the movie managed to create a good villain in him. Despite being the bad guy, however, his relationship towards Le Fou is in no way hateful. In fact, their friendship is one I considered to be one of the most interesting in the entire movie!

As for Le Fou, I dare say he was one of my favourite characters. Contrary to his original counterpart he is in no way a fool. In fact, he is the one keeping Gaston in check, knowing his best friends behaviour, trying to keep him in line while simultaneously taking his jabs and making fun of him as well. Compared to the original, their relationship is much more equal and lighthearted. Gaston is still the dreamy guy everyone is into, but he doesn’t treat Le Fou as a peace of shit for it. In fact, despite his obviously homoerotic undertones, even towards Gaston, the latter never once ridicules him for it. Not only that, but Le Fou undergoes great character growth over the course of the movie and it was a pleasure to watch.

As for the Beauty and the Beast themselves, there is not too much to say. The characters themselves weren’t changed too much and yet there was still a fresh air about them. It’s hard to explain without giving too much away. However, I can say that both of them are obviously flawed and both of them undergo a growth as well. Not only the Beast but Belle too. Instead of brushing their flaws off once the plots wants them to be in love they are openly addressed and worked on. Both parties realize their mistakes and even admit to them. It certainly was a nice, little change and I happily watched their relationship develop step by step.

As for a direct comparison of the original to the new one I can say without doubt and guilt that the new movie is better. A lot of the flaws of the original – whether due to ignorance or because of the time it was created it – were taken care off in this movie. The Stockholm Syndrome people accuse the original of is handled better and I say this with a particular conversation in mind that directly addresses the issue of freedom there is for Belle. The movie also works much better in establishing the character, their relationships and especially their pasts. You get to know more about Belle and the Beast that give you a better insight into them and explain, to a certain extend, why their relationship develops the way it does.

So, in conclusion, the movie does great in sweeping you away into a beautiful, magical world. It has a great tone, the music is catchy, the scenery is breathtaking and it hits home in just the right places. While the original was beautiful and unique to experience and is an irreplaceable part of many childhoods, it was extremely flawed. While it isn’t to say that this version is not flawed – it undeniably is – the new Beauty and the Beast managed to give you nostalgia without making the same mistakes as its predecessor. It adds a new depth and strength to our already beloved characters that make me happy in the sense of knowing that another generation will grow up with a better version of our childhood heroes.

Just saw Wonder Woman. And I only have two words right now, because I’m still shook. FUCKING PHENOMENAL. There will be a real review later, when I have collected myself. But seriously, I walked in expecting a DC bomb once again. I was absolutely fucking wrong. Just…I hope this isn’t the only movie to come out fantastic. Like a one hit wonder. Still HOLY SHIT I’M SHOOK AS ALL HELL, GOOSEBUMPS AND ALL FOLKS. GOOSEBUMPS AND ALL. (I also now ship Steve x Diana. Goodbye Bruce, you had your time. But stab me in the heart don’t get me started on Steve and Diana. I might cry. I love them so much)

Originally posted by dcfilms

Book of Atlantic (sub)

Back from the premiere of Kuroshitsuji: Book of Atlantic! Went with my friends and we cosplayed the reaper trio (Will, Grell, and Ronald).

***SPOILERS AHEAD. SCROLL PAST TO AVOID***


I’m pleased with how well it stuck to the manga but of course there are changes to the lines and all. I’m super disappointed they cut Ciel’s speech to Snake about accepting himself and Tanaka was only mentioned during Seb’s Cinematic Record (and about 2 seconds of screen time in the beginning seeing Ciel off).

The animation was really good and beautifully smooth (2D only, the 3D models are still really wonky and out of place). The sound effects were on point and they really did well with Sebastian’s demon voice. If you were looking for a voice change with Undertaker it is definitely noticeable (much lower and smoother than his usual squeaky door voice lol). He is SIGNIFICANTLY more overpowered in the movie than in the manga. But that might just be me. He was swinging his scythe and sending out huge plumes of fire (? lasers? glowing wind???) And demolishing things without his scythe even being near it (if it was unclear in the manga, Undertaker definitely swung his scythe and cut the boat in half in the movie with his scythe from the inside).

I personally felt that having the animation made it much more clear how they were moving and fighting than in the manga and the camera movements and sound effects really enhanced the overall feel of the fighting sequences. The fight with the reapers, Sebastian, and Undertaker felt really intense. The green glowing effects they added to Undertaker and his scythe really created a more intimidating image of him imo

Things I’m glad they kept:
-Titanic scene with Grell and Ron
-Seb in a doctor outfit
-Ronald riding his scythe like a segway
-The derpy chibi expressions from the manga
-The scene between Ciel and Lizzy with both of them being stubborn then apologizing
-Snake being more expressive than in the Circus Arc/season
-Lizzy’s flashbacks

I’d go see it again honestly, but I’ll have to wait for the dubbed DVD like everyone else now lol (Also because I want to know if Undertaker’s voice change translates over into the English dub). Feel free to hit me up about the movie if you like! :D

came back home from la la land and i’ve never been so awestruck in a theatre my entire life, i’m not even joking. pls don’t miss la la land just bc it’s a romance bc literally it’s so much more.

it’s about chasing seemingly unattainable dreams, & telling anyone who doubts you to go fuck themselves. it’s about sacrifice, compromise, chaos, and love. it’s a masterpiece & yes i did cry bc oMG did it hit home. the romance is merely an aspect, not the focus.

as a creator, it was literally catered to folks like us shooting high while ppl try to drag us down. i actually needed this movie so much, “here’s to the hearts” had tears streaming down my face. i never say this but i’m 100% serious when i say this may be my all time favourite movie i’ve seen thus far & i’ve seen a lOT.

everything about it - the cinematography, the soundtrack (hOLY FUCK the soundtrack bless), the casting, the way the story unraveled, i’m honestly so happy. i wish i could write you guys an eloquent review and analysis and perhaps i will do a proper review later after having more time to just digest this entire thing but as of now i’m just. fuckin enchanted so all i can give you is this brain vomit and a push in the direction of your local cinema. PLS PLS PLS watch it, i beg of you, you will not regret it and well if you do, i guess it just didn’t hit you the way it hit me but i rEALLY hope it does. if any of you see it, scream about it with me, it’s a movie that will always be close to my foolish heart. thank you damien chazelle.

The Strength of Two

Summary: Courage comes at a cost.

Pairing: Soul/Maka

Rating: T

Tags: Angst, Anxiety, Hurt/Comfort, Humor

Word Count: 1,600

Available on Ao3. Special thanks to @skadventuretime for being a lovely beta~

If you ask Soul Evans if he has any superpowers, he would say for certain that he does. But he won’t tell you about how he can turn into a literal fucking scythe, nor about the way he is able to command the rhythm of a fight with an improvised melody from the piano in his mind. While he might cite his cool-kid aesthetic as being ‘super,’ if you ask him in earnest, he will tell you that his power is being able to read his meister like she reads Austen.

Keep reading

[INTERVIEW] Armed & Dangerous

An interview by Armie Hammer Global

With at least four movies coming out this year, including the explosive Free Fire and the exquisite Call Me By Your Name, 2017 will definitely be a busy year for Armie. At Armie Hammer Global, we sat down to speak with the boss man himself about his career, his upcoming projects, and even about fans. 

 Let’s set the scene for all of you. It’s April Fool’s Day, but this meet up is dead serious (well…not really but at least a little bit). We are spread on three different time zones and two continents, but the common sunny weather makes it seem like the three of us are all in the same place, and of course, we’re all smiles. We won’t lie to you…it took a hot minute to all but Samurai Jack our way around some technical difficulties, but if there’s one common trait we share, it’s the ability to be absolute troopers through hardship. Thankfully, it wasn’t terribly long before we were all face-to-face (screen-to-face?) with one another and ready to delve into our little chat, starting with Armie’s incredible adaptability. 

Armie Hammer Global: Your filmography is very diverse. One project is completely different from another. You’ve been in big productions, indie films, you’ve played a lot of different characters. Was this richness something you wanted and aimed for? 
Armie Hammer: Yes and no. You know, that’s part of the fun of being an actor; it’s getting to do all the different stuffs and getting to work with different people and do different projects, play different characters, which is a lot of fun. I’ve been really lucky that I’ve got to do a little bit of an array of different characters. But the main criteria for how I pick my projects is really who is directing it. It’s just so important in movie making, the director and his vision and his execution of that. That has so much more to do with how a movie turns out than I feel almost anything else, including the script and all the rest. It really is just about the director. More than anything I just aim to work with a diverse list of directors, therefore it’s been a great process getting to work with so many different directors and do so many different projects. I feel lucky. More so than actually I feel like I am in control of making the decisions. 

 What a perfect transition with our next question! We know that you would like to direct someday. What kind of director would you be? The one that writes, produces and does everything, or just stay behind the camera? 
It’s a good question. I don’t know yet. I know that I want to direct movies and I’ve been privileged enough to see so many great directors sort of first-hand direct movies, and I’ve said to myself, “Oh, I’m definitely going to steal that,” or, “Oh, that’s a really good idea, I’ll make sure I do that.” I would like to think that I would have the attention to details that David Fincher has, the relaxed warm nature that Stanley Tucci has, the vision that Ben Wheatley has. All the directors each bring something so different to it. I don’t know what I would bring to it because I haven’t done it yet. 

Do you usually pay attention to the reviews of your movies and has one ever upset you? Have you ever critiqued a critic about you?
I would ultimately like to say I never read reviews, and that they never bothered me or anything like that, but the fact of the matter is when you’re there and the movie is coming out, it’s such a sort of all-encompassing feeling where everybody is on pins and needles. Everybody is anticipating the release and what’s going to happen, how numbers are going to look, what the reviews are going to say. If they’re good people kind of celebrate and they say, “Look at this one, look at this one!”, and if they’re bad, they go, “Look what you wrote!”. It’s impossible to avoid them, just because that’s the society and that’s the age we live in now. But I don’t seek out reviews, definitely. I definitely have read things said about me, in reviews and things like that, specifically about Lone Ranger. That one got a really bad reaction from really everybody without anyone expecting it. That one didn’t feel so good, other than that, it’s been fine. 

And you have received some really great reviews for Call Me By Your Name!
Yeah, we got a lot! But I’m more excited about the fact that Luca got such great reviews. We were in all those places where we were premiering the movie, and just seeing how happy it made him it was really nice.

Directed by Luca Guadagnino, Call Me By Your Name is the adaptation of the same titled book written by Andre Aciman. It tells the love story between Elio Perlman (played by Timothée Chalamet), a 17 years-old American-Italian boy spending the summer in the family villa in Italy, and Oliver (played by Armie in the film), a 24 years-old American scholar who stays with the Perlmans for the summer in order to work on his doctorate and help Elio’s father with his correspondences. Set in the 80’s, Call Me By Your Name takes you on a ride through a beautiful and hot Italy. The film was very appreciated by the audiences of Sundance and the Berlinale, two movie festivals where it was played. The various screenings were followed by unanimously positive reviews from both the festivalgoers and critics.
Call Me By Your Name is set to have a limited release in New York and Los Angeles starting on November 24th 2017.

Armie as Oliver in Call Me By Your Name. Picture courtesy of Sony Pictures Classic. 

In the book, Elio describes Oliver as a complex person. Do you think that Oliver is as complex as Elios sees him, or is it Elio’s youth and inexperience that blinds him?
It’s both. They are both really intricate and complex humans. They are two people trying to figure themselves out. They are trying to figure out life, they are trying to discover what they like, what they enjoy, what sets them off. It’s not necessarily that one is more complex than the other or anything like that. Both of them are sort of like coming of age and discovering themselves. Obviously, more or so with Elio because he is a little bit younger than Oliver. It’s honestly about two people finding a connection and really realizing that there is something deeper there and having the courage to do something about it. And in some ways, you can really relate to what is happening to them. Everybody has felt, at some point in their life, that feeling of butterflies in the stomach. You don’t know why you feel this when you’re around that specific person, but you know that you feel something strong with them, and having to find the courage to do something about it, the beauty that can unfold with that. And then like all great summer romances that almost everybody’s had, they end. 

What was the most complicated thing about playing a role like Oliver? Were you anxious about filming the more sensual scenes?
I wouldn’t say that I was anxious about filming the sensual scenes. I would say that there were things in this movie I had to do on camera that I had never done on camera before, like being comfortable being naked or being intimate with another man. I have never done that in my personal life, being intimate with another man (laughs). For me, I recognize more than anything, it was going to be a very good challenge as an actor because I would have to act, because this isn’t something I do in my everyday life, this isn’t something I really recognize. I had to do a lot of work to understand the psychology behind these guys, I had to do a lot of work to understand the things that they did together because it’s just different from how I live my life. Which is, by the way, I guess, all acting really is. It should be different from you, right? Otherwise, we are just doing the same part over and over. 

Would you say that acting is a form of art?
Yes, it’s just a different medium. You don’t use paint or brushes or anything like that, but acting is one of the oldest jobs in the world, and basically our job as an actor is to be able to put ourselves into a situation and allow someone watching it a way into it. For Call Me By Your Name for example, everybody has been talking about this peach scene, where Elio is intimate with a peach. I honestly don’t get it. Nothing about that scene really makes sense to me necessarily; because I never had sex with a piece of fruit and I have never eaten a fruit that someone else has had sex with. And I wouldn’t think a lot of people have. But our job while in that scene is to give somebody a window into it where even if they go, “I would never do that, I would not do it,” they also say, “but I understand why these two people are doing this”. It’s about experiencing it yourself while you’re there, but also emoting such a way that you give people a way into it, which is the challenge. It’s our job as an actor to sort of reflect what’s going on in society, give it back to people, give them something to think about, give them something to feel. Not to sound all grandiose or whatever.

Armie Hammer is the cool Ord in Ben Wheatley’s new movie Free Fire. Picture courtesy of A24.

Boston, 1978, a gun deal in an empty warehouse goes wrong and turns into a real bullets fest. That is Free Fire, a brilliant and explosive comedy directed by Ben Wheatley and in which Armie plays Ord, the middleman that looks way too cool for the situation. Free Fire is simply an hour and a half of pure fun and great lines sublimed by a talented cast. Already out in the UK, the movie will hit more theaters across the world by the end of April, including in North America on April 21st, Russia and Australia on April 27th. 

We saw Free Fire and absolutely loved it! What struck us the most in the movie is that, despite the crazy and out of hand situation depicted, every shot seems really precise.
If you knew how much work actually went into the film and Ben. They had to plan out every bullet hit in the movie months before we got there. And then you have a bunch of actors who show up and go, “Actually, I wanna go over there and do that,” and he’s like, “Nonono you can’t go over there”. It was like a real process. It’s so funny because when we started making that movie the script was sort of different from now. Because Ben is so fluid as a director, he writes and comes up with everything, he and his wife together. If there was anything that needed change it was changed right there on the set. And all of us got together, all the acting crew, and had such a good time with this movie that it just became funny. It really kind of became what it is now. A lot of the lines that you see that are like, the funny lines, whether it’s some of Sharlto (Copley) or some of mine, are all things that we really came up with on set.

Ord is quite the character. Despite the situation, he seems to keep things in control and it’s intriguing. Tell us a bit more about him. What is his story? Where does his calm come from?
Basically, Ord is so calm…because he’s just seen too much shit. This is like 1978, so about 8 years after he probably got back from Vietnam. This is the backstory that I gave the character. The reason why he got the nickname Ord is that he was an explosive expert in Vietnam. And his specialty, because he is a bit of a sick, twisted fucker, is that he would put posters in Vietnamese on a tree with big writing, and every line the writing would get a little bit smaller, a little bit smaller and a little bit smaller till eventually it was tiny. Then he would put landmines at the bottom of the tree so people would come up to read it and blow up. He’s a bit of a head case and he was in Vietnam, and I read a book about Vietnam called the Short Timers, which is actually a book that Full Metal Jacket is based of off. I read that and there is a really interesting line about it that says, “You don’t know the truth until you know death,” or something like that, “because death is the ultimate truth and everything else is really lies”. These guys in Vietnam expected to die every single minute so they just became friends with death, in a weird way, because they knew it was the only truth that existed, like, “He’s not a bad guy or a good guy, the truth is, he’s gonna die and I’m gonna die”. So, Ord came so close to dying so many times, like, “I should be dead so it doesn’t really matter at this point anymore”. He gets shot and he’s like, “Ah fuck”! He doesn’t have fear because he has already been so scared that nothing can scare him anymore. That’s why he’s pretty cool under pressure, that’s why he knows how to work with firearms better than anybody else, that’s why he is tactically minded, and that’s why as soon as it started to elevate, he backs up.

Do you have a lot of control on how you create your characters?
I would say it is teamwork. The writer is ultimately the one that puts everything down on paper. And then if the script is good enough, the director gets involved, and then boom you have a movie that kind of starts to go. The writer really sort of comes up with the foundation of everything. But obviously, they have written it before anybody was casted, so it’s not like he can tailor-make a role that fits perfectly. He makes the role that’s in his head. So once they hire an actor, it’s about finding symbiosis between the actor, the writer, and the director so that everybody is happy. Ultimately, you want the writer to be happy, the director to be happy and you, as an artist, you want to be happy. So it becomes more like teamwork. Sometimes you have more control sometimes you have less. I mean, when I did the Social Network, I had very little control over everything because the other people in control were David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin, and I definitely don’t think I know more than these guys.

Let’s talk about Mine because that really is a big moment for you! That was the very first movie you were just starring by yourself, your name is on the poster and everywhere. How does that feel for you? And congratulations by the way!
Thank you! It was great. It was a lot of pressure, especially because, for a majority of the movie, I’m really the only person on screen. I probably shot 75% of the film by myself, as the only actor and person in the scene, which is crazy. It doesn’t really give you anything to play of off, anybody to take cues from. It was a lot of work and we shot it in the Canary Islands, small islands channel along the coast of Morocco, it was hot, it was windy, we had sandstorms, lightning strikes, and it was just crazy. It was an intense filming. But I am happy I got to work with two great new Italian directors, Fabio and Fabio. I got to work with Tom Cullen who, in my opinion, is one of the best working actors out there right now. Annabelle Wallis as well, she was fantastic, Jeff Bells…it was a lot of fun making that movie. For a movie I basically stand still the entire time, I was shocked at how physically challenging it was.

Mike has to survive 52 hours in the desert with one knee on the ground. Not the most comfortable position, how was it for you?
I was probably kneeling 10 hours a day, for a month or something. My right knee still pops and gives me trouble and hurts. I was on my right knee the whole time with my left foot up. My knee is still kind of shocked.

Armie hits where you don’t expect him, including in animated movies. Earlier this year, the actor officially joined the Cars family and voiced Jackson Storm, one of the new characters from the third installment of the Disney Pixar franchise. We don’t know much about his cool-looking character yet, except that he is really fast and, apparently, not so likable. 

First of all, we are very, very excited about this particular project because we love Cars! How did you become a part of the project?
I don’t actually know. I got a phone call from my agent one day, and he was like, “Buddy, I just got a call from Pixar,” and I was like, “What?” and he’s like, “They want you to be in the new Cars movie,” and I was like, “Are you serious? I’m so excited!” I was really lucky; I didn’t have to audition, I didn’t have to do anything. They just kind of called and said, “Do you want to be in this movie?” Maybe they were like, “You know Armie is an asshole, he’d be a really good asshole in the movie.”

We read somewhere that you were chosen thanks to your role as the Winklevoss twins in the Social Network.
Well, they were assholes so there’s that (laughs).


If you have twitter, you probably already saw screen captures of, often very funny, conversations between Armie and fans. Needless to say his answers are always very appreciated by the lucky ones who receive his messages.

You answer a lot to fans online. Why do you dedicate so much time to it?
Well, the reason that I talk to you guys is really because you’re nice. You seem like well-rounded and normal people, you guys live your life. You like my work and that’s nice and I do appreciate that. I don’t answer to everybody, that’s for sure. I would say that I spend so much time answering to people because if somebody is going to take the time to write something and go out of their way and say, “Hey man, I just wanna say I really like your movie,” or whatever, it’s nice, it’s appreciated. It is the same as like if you’re a chef and someone says, “Oh my god, I love the way you cook salmon, I love your steak.” You’re kind of an asshole if you just go, “yeah whatever”. I don’t know, they took the time to write for me, so it’s only fair that I take the time to say, “thanks I appreciate it”.

Not everybody really does that. Another thing we noticed is that there’s no sense of hierarchy with you. You treat fans as normal people, not as ones who are less than you.
I think that the root of that is probably that those people, who treat people like that, think that they are not normal people, either. They think they’re above everything. At the end of the day, you’re doing your job. I trained as an actor, I went to school as an actor, this is what I studied. It’s like being an electrical engineer. I just get to do my job, I get to make movies, I get to do this. It brings so much joy to me to make movies and if it brings that much joy to someone to watch a movie, then that works, it’s great. It seems like teamwork, almost.


To finish, we offered to switch roles, allowing Armie to ask us anything he wanted. Because April Fool’s!
Armie: How much time out of your day do you spend working on the site? Armie Hammer Global: Well, it depends on what you are doing. For example, last year, when you were promoting three different movies at each festival, it would take up to three hours every evening. We usually search for your name, for pictures, videos, interviews, and articles, and we also monitor social media. In the end, it’s really all about organization, because it also depends on how busy we are with our lives. /

***
Cars 3 will come out on June 16 in the US Mine is now out on DVD/Blu-Ray and HD digital in Italy, Spain and the US.

Kaatru Veliyidai

tagging @acceptmeorleave since you asked!

I wasn’t planning on writing a review but I lurked through reviews on tumblr and otherwise to see if anyone had said what was on my mind, and nobody really had (everyone’s either too light or too harsh imo) so I decided to roll up my sleeves and type this out. (It gets long so there’s a readmore, also full of spoilers)

First things first I never like writing only bad things about something, so here’s what I liked:

  • Aditi. The only person who like, actually acted properly in this movie.
  • Her outfits. I mean, hello! (I mean I was complaining about why a doctor would be wearing such things while at work, but I mean every single one of her outfits were stunning.)
  • the music. (duhhhhhhh) and the cinematography (also duhhhhh.) 

That’s about it. (woops.) 


It seems that Mani Ratnam’s goal in this film was as follows: 

Doctor and fighter pilot fall in love. Fighter pilot is a sexist, self-centered, egoistical piece of poo (who mostly likely has Dad Problems™). (however he is somehow self aware enough to realize he is incapable of living as a husband/father.) Doctor still loves him anyways and keeps coming back to him, effectively hurting herself in the process - ie. The Textbook Abusive Relationship (seriously, this movie could be used as an educational tool.) But of course, it’s filmy, so we’re going to make it seem ~tragically beautiful~ for the aesthetic and add some ‘she was his salvation, he was her destruction’ type stuff. (quite literally “she is light, I am darkness” is a direct quote from namma male lead.) 

AND THEN, our fighter pilot gets captured by the enemy. During his time in prison, he reflects on his awful behaviour, and realizes his mistakes. When he is finally free and united with his lover, he apologizes, a reformed man, and now takes on the responsibility of a family man (and does a good job of it). We leave learning a lesson: we now know what an abusive relationship looks like, having learnt from Leela and VC’s mistakes. We swear not to let a man walk all over us, we swear to value our s/o as an equal. We leave the film happy knowing that Leela is safe with a reformed VC.

Unfortunately, that’s not how this film turned out. 

Keep reading

The Mummy 2017 review

I have spent weeks now seeing people say “This movie is just a shitty remake no one wanted of the Brendan Fraser movies!” and “Tom Cruise is a shit actor, so this movie will suck!” and let me tell you, it wore on me. I mean, first off, this movie is a remake of the movie those Brendan Fraser movies are a remake of; the Boris Karloff mummy films of the past. And yet again, it’s only a loose remake. And Tom Cruise is a great actor when he’s in the right film; the guy does his own stunts and has plenty of charisma and charm, just because he’s been known to go nuts in real life doesn’t mean he sucks. But all that aside, I finally saw it, and what do I really think of it?

It’s… pretty decent.

That’s a shock, huh? It hasn’t been getting the best reaction from… well, anyone really, but in all honesty, it’s a decent enough action-horror-fantasy film. I guess the big issue is that it doesn’t really set itself out from the crowd too much, but we’ll get to that shortly. First, the plot:

Nick Morton is a thief and a rapscallion, who steals relics to sell on the black market. When treasure hunting in Iraq, he and his buddy accidentally unearth the tomb of an ancient evil princess who had a pact with Set, god of the dead, and then accidentally unleashes her on the modern world. Can he stop her before she sacrifices him so he can become the mortal vessel for the god Set?

Keep reading

For the love of God, please go see Wonder Woman. Immediately.


I have literally no criticisms of it whatsoever. It was basically flawless. It’s a fantastic film that pretty much destroys the patriarchy in 2 hours.


I honestly was in tears not because of something sad or emotional, but because of how insanely gorgeous the battle sequences were. This is a woman fighting men- and only men- with usually nothing but her shield and her lasso, yet completely kicking their asses. That mixed with the beautiful score and the fucking fantastic cinematography actually made me cry like a baby.


I’m so happy that we finally have a female superhero movie directed by a women. It was everything I could have ever hoped for and more. And tbh, it’s now my favourite superhero movie. So I don’t care if you dislike the DCEU or if you’re the world’s biggest Marvel Stan- please, please, PLEASE do yourself a favour and go see this movie. Right now.

2

Seriously though, that was unexpected!

This movie really is an intense thrill-ride both in the feelings and the action. The space battles are truly memorable, with the beginning battle on Hoth and the Millennium Falcon dodging asteroids while escaping The Empire, and it only gets better in the lightsaber fights and the suspenseful scenes. But this doesn’t diminish the impact the characters make or how much their personalities are fleshed out. In fact they are the ones that make the action so good because of how much I cared about them.

I really enjoyed this movie, from start to finish, though I’m concerned if that also has to do with how positive everyone is about it. I have yet to see someone bad mouth this film, it’s one of those rare titles that gets almost no hate whatsoever. And I’m worried I might’ve gotten swept by the tide of praise towards it. Don’t get me wrong though, it earns this praise. It’s an excellent title that leaves you wanting for more, and I really can’t wait to see the next one. Bring on Episode VI!

And now, if you excuse me, I need to subject myself to a paternity test. Seriously, if a guy with an evil voice and his face covered claims he’s your father, you better get a paternity test.

I just saw Now You See Me 2 and. Oh. My. God.

I’ve been a fan of the first movie since the day it came out, and I’ve seen it multiple times, so I was expecting something really amazing for the second one, and it did not disappoint.

Everything about this movie was so amazing and so mind blowing that by the end of the movie I was just ready to throw my popcorn into the air. I’m not giving any spoilers, but every single detail is important, even the insignificant ones. And the CAST. oh my gosh. Daniel Radcliffe morphed into the villain so well and it was intimidating to watch him because there is so much passion in his acting and it was just mind blowing.

Too be honest, I’m going as far to say it was better than the first movie.

Tl;dr this movie is amazing and you need to watch it, especially if you’re into secret societies, mystery, and magic.

Movie Night | Wooseok

Group: Pentagon
Member: Wooseok
Summary: Movie night with Wooseok
Drabble game: #107 “You, me, popcorn, two liter Dr.pepper, and a movie. You in?” #104 “…or we can chill in our underwear.” #84 “come on baby, up to bed.”
A/N:best request I love this.

You leaned over your couch reading the guide out of complete boredom. After you begged your boyfriend Wooseok to come over he sadly declined and said he had some dance practice to do.

You flipped through the channels not really caring about what was on. You secretly missed Wooseok. Having such limited contact with him was taking a toll on you.

A knock on the door made you jump up. You looked at the door in a confused manner no one planned to visit you.

Getting up you picked through the eye hole to see your boyfriend face he was doing a small peace sign. “It’s me baby” he grinned, laughing at his chessy words.

You quickly unlocked the door to reveal your tall rapper boyfriend. He was holding a bag full of items. “You, me, popcorn, two liter Dr.pepper, and a movie. You in? ” he asked.

You smiled jumping into your boyfriends arms loving the feeling of his bear hugs. “Wooseok you’re a dork” you grinned pulling him into your house.

A feeling of upmost love could be felt for your loving boyfriend.

You pulled him on the couch “Wooseok you’re not at practice why” you asked him. He smiled setting the food down “well I begged Hoetak to let me out early and he agreed after I reviewed the dance like 20 times” he grinned.

“I’m so happy I was bored to death” you said “now what movie do you have” you asked him looking at the bag. “Train to busan we weren’t able to see it because of I training so let’s watch it” he said getting up putting the dvd on the side of your tv.

“…or we can chill in our underwear” you said raising a eyebrow. Wooseok ears turned red “did you read my mind” he said. You nodded “we should keep our clothing on so I can focus on the movie and not your body ” Wooseok said grinning looking at your body eagerly.

Wooseok prepared the popcorn took out cups for the drinks and you guys sat down ready to watch the movie.

You laid your head on Wooseok shoulder while to watched the zombie movie. He held you st the scary parts and you both stayed quiet in tense moments.It was a heart filled movie about a father and daughter. 

Tears were coming out both of you guys when you watched the end part. You were tried and nodding off during the credits “that was sad” you said yawning and cuddling into your boyfriend. A sudden feeling of tiredness filled you.

Wooseok smiled at you he had a tried look on his face as well “come in baby, up to bed” he said pulling you up. You nodded following him up to your bed.

“Wooseok you can stay the night” you said cuddling into your bed. “Should I” he asked running his fingers through your hair.

“Yes baby you should so I can cuddle you” you yawned closing your eyes feeling Wooseok large body dip into bed with you.

KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS review by Steve Oatney —

Stop what you’re doing, and go see this movie.

That’s all I need, or want, to say, but you probably would like for me to say just a bit more, eh? Well, okay then. Let me say this: There are two movies at the top of my list for 2016. Were they Suicide Squad and X-Men: Apocalypse as I had hoped they might be? No. No they were not. My two favorite films of 2016 are Swiss Army Man (starring Paul Dano & Daniel Radcliffe) and now KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS is right up there, on the top rung, with it.

At a glance, Kubo looks like your everyday run-of-the-mill animated movie for kids, but it is so much more than that. Is it good for kids? Yes? Is it a silly cartoon? No. Kubo is the story of a young boy who has a knack for storytelling combined with a magical-power he can use while playing music. He can make paper dance, play, fold itself into origami, and even fly. His power was given to him by his mother, an other-worldly magic-user who falls in love with a human and they have a child together, against the wishes of her family.

As Kubo’s father, a once great Samurai, is believed to be deceased, and his mother’s health is failing, Kubo is a full-time caregiver to her. Then, things get interesting. Very interesting. Kubo only has one eye, as his grandfather (another other-worldly magic-user) took it from him in attempt to blind him from the world, believing that his family-members should be above all things earth-bound. Ever since, Kubo’s mother has done what she can to keep Kubo (and his one remaining eye) hidden from his grandfather and two aunts who can apparently only hunt for him at night.

Things go completely haywire when Kubo is caught off-guard while staying out too late and nighttime falls. In order to protect Kubo, his mother gives him temporary wings and sends him away while she battles her sisters who have now found the boy. Kubo awakes to find a monkey tasked with his protection. Together, they begin a search for three items. A magical sword, breastplate of armor, and a helmet, which are the only items that can help keep Kubo safe from his grandfather and aunts. Along the way they meet a humanoid beetle who used to be a human warrior and was cursed to live as a bug with no memory, but the beetle knows that the symbol on Kubo’s jacket is the same as his own warrior’s crest, so he pledges to help Kubo find the magic items, and the true adventure begins!

I’ll not spoil any more of the plot, but will say that the overall moral of the story is so touching, so heartwarming, and so wonderful, that it was a joy to see unfold. Believe me when I say that this achievement in animated filmmaking by Laika (The Boxtrolls, ParaNorman, Coraline) is on par with the astounding work of Pixar and is not to be missed.

Did I mention that Charlize Theron, Matthew McConaughey, George Takei, and Rooney Mara all voiced characters? They all do beautiful work, but Art Parkinson, who voices Kubo, brings the character, and the film, to life with the help of a HUGE team of animators who created this 3D stop-motion fantasy action adventure film of epic proportion!

As I said, and was tempted to leave as nothing more than: Go see this movie.

3

“First rule of magic: always he the smartest person in the room.”


Now You See Me 2 the settle to the surpringly good first movie is directed by Jon M. Chu (Step Up 2, GIJOE 2) and written by Ed Solomon (Bill & Ted, Now You See Me, Men in Black, Charlie’s Angels, Super Mario Bros). Let me get this out of my system now… It should have been called, Now You Don’t! But I understand that would completely fly over any audience members who haven’t seen and like the first movie. Well, for those of you who haven’t seen it, it is essentially a comedy action thriller about a group of performance magicians (like Chris Angel and David Blaine, Lance Burton, etc.) who are paired together by a mystical calling. Each one possess their own style of magic, and together they form this apparently magical super group called, The Four Horseman. The mystery element is actually quite a fun and exciting caper, with quite the ridiculously good ending reveal. There’s no way you will catch the “tell” throughout the movie, and by the end, it’s so crazy you might not have expected it. It is a fun time, with likeable characters, I highly recommend it. I own it on Bluray, if that means anything. The sequel picks up 18 months after the ending revelation of the first, as The Four Horseman are now underground, on the run from government activity and suspicion. There demand and popularity among the public are at an all time high in success. There is one casting replacement from pretty Isla Fisher to the attractive Lizzy Caplan, as apparently Isla’s character left in the movie. The rest remain the same. It will be difficult to reveal certain plot points or criticisms without spoiling it, but I’ll do my best. An old enemy comes back into their now continued successful lives, and the magical mystery begins unraveling once more, as they need to band up with new friends to discover the secret.


MAIN CAST:

- Woody Harrelson (Natural Born Killers, True Detective, Zombieland, No Country for Old Men, Seven Psychopaths, Triple 9, Out of the Furnace, Defendor, The People vs Larry Flynt, Kingpin, The Thin Red Line, Semi-Pro, 2012, Rampart, Hunger Games, *War on the Planet of the Apes)

- Mark Ruffalo (Collateral, Zodiac, The Avengers, Spotlight, Shutter Island, Brothers Bloom, Foxcatcher, Begin Again)

- Jesse Eisenberg (The Social Network, Zombieland, The End of the Tour, American Ultra, Adventureland, The Double, BvS, Rio, *Cafe Society)

- Lizzy Caplan (Cloverfield, Mean Girls, The Interview, Masters of Sex, The Night Before)

- Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter, Horns, Kill Your Darlings, *Swiss Army Man)

- Dave Franco (Neighbors, 21 Jump Street, Fright Night, Warm Bodies, *The Masterpiece)

- Morgan Freeman (Se7en, Shawshank Redemption, Unforgiven, Gone Baby Gone, Bruce Almighty, The Dark Knight trilogy, Amistad, The Bucket List, Oblivion, Lucky Number Slevin, Olympus/London Has Fallen, Robin Hood, RED, Lucy, Outbreak)


The biggest problem I had with this accepted sequek was that it became to incomprehensible and wacky that I lost some respect and admiration. Wherein the first movie actually gave reasoning and showed parlor tricks, giving us a hint of how things occurred, a plausibility (like a magician), the sequel was blown out of proportions. Although I will give director Chu credit with infusing his Chinese heritage in placing the story in Macau, as well as giving the movie elements of Ocean’s Eleven panache and flare, the plot was very convoluted. Every magic trick has three parts as we learn in Christopher Nolan’s best film, The Prestige: the pledge, the turn, and the prestige. Now You See Me 2 succeeds in the pledge, it falters towards the end of the pledge by not allowing us to get insight and wonder, and it fails in giving us the magical Prestige. No matter how cool and suave the acting and tricks were, I was pulling at air to understand how some of them were even possible. It seems as if the universe of the movie became full on magical, and I’m okay with that for the future, I was just expecting the movie to continue its theme of Robin Hood-esque playable explainable tricks and illusions over unknown magic.

PROS:

+ Main Cast

+ Woody Harrelson

+ style

+ Special Effects

+ Security check heist sequence


CONS:

- Daniel Radcliffe

- Plot

- Ridiculously ludicrous at times


Although the plot was very convoluted, bouncing around the world, literally, I had a entertaining time. I feel like I had a funner time watching this movie than Warcraft. I still recommend watching the first movie, as I feel it is superior to the sequel in both strayed and style. But yes, even with a crazy very mixed character wise plot zooming from China to US, to London, etc. the actors did very well. I really liked the group as a whole, as their comraderie was very prevalent and led their pursuits. Individually they have their string suits, and together they form a much more cohesive and slick moving unit. The one downside in the acting of the man group was that they did not get the single moments to shine. The sequel does give you a 5min intro summary to catch up, but it also expects you to already be familiarized and welcoming of the Horsemen. The first movie gave them their moments to shine alone, but that’s because they had to be depicted as selfish and isolated to get the inevitable unlikely heroes banded together vibe. The rivalry between Eisenberg and Harrelson was still present as they play around with each other, mirrored to Franco’s greenhorn rookie fitting in. New entry, Lizzy Caplan does a good job at jumping in on the already close knit group. She serves as the comedic relief, and I’d say she pulled it off rather well, along with proving to be independent in no need of the men to back her up. Each of the Horsemen have their magical specialty whether it be hipnosis or card tricks or more, and each element is thrown in. On the supporting side, Mark Ruffalo brings his A game once again, proving that he can bring heart, emotion, and intensity to any role he chooses. Opposite him, Morgan Freeman surprisingly does not phone it in, as his smooth talking, one step ahead type character was legitimately fun to hear and watch. I was a hit disappointed with Daniel Radcliffe and the lack of Harry Potter inside jokes haha. His character served as the sort of antagonist billionaire baddie with infinite resources and thugs. There were elements of a lackluster Bond villain if he were to be much younger. Radcliffe didn’t really convince me, nor did he impress really. Once again, it is the Four Horsemen you want to watch, and I’d say they deliver in the entertainment field.

Some other aspects I thought note worthy, we’re the action and special effects. They looked both stylish and very cool, but like the tricks, when questioned, you don’t get an answer or possibility out of them. Some of the scenes were so out there that you just had to role with the punches this sequel preps over the initial movie. Don’t get me wrong, when the Horsemen did their acts and magic tricks, although they were legit magic at times, I had fun watching it occur (especially the card tricks). Where all these effects and magic seem to be headed is in the direction of a full out magical element underneath our known world. At this point, it seems like The Horsemen are actual magician sorcerers who can bend rules of reality. So if the likely third installment unveils the curtain and shows us the trick underneath completely and magically, I think they’d be accepted. Continuing along the path of saying they are merely illusions is not going to cut it anymore. Just go ahead and bring us the real magic, and hell, a evil sorcerer villain. It’ll be perfectly acceptable, as Dr. Strange is going to bring us back to some magicians on screen.


Overall, I had a good time with this lengthy magician comedy heist. I definetly think it is worth a watch, preferably after you watch the first movie. There are elements carried over from the first movie, but nothing that will leave you in the blind from not seeing it. Of course, you will miss the inside jokes, group mentality, and big plot twist by not seeing the first, but it is not mandatory. I’d say that Now You See Me 2 fits into the universe of the very style over logical substance of the latter Fast and the Furious. Once again, where the first movie actually allowed us to wonder and believe soon of the tricks were real, the sequel blows out all the windows and settles for anything is possible, nothing needs to be explained. With all that said, it is exciting, fun, Las Vegas cool, and has a very likeable group of characters.


7/10 & B$A


*NO END CREDIT SCENE*

MUNCHFLIX: LOVE NEVER DIES

IMDB BLURB: Having relocated to a vivacious amusement resort in Coney Island, The Phantom of the Paris Opera House uses a pseudonym to invite renowned soprano Christine Daaé to perform. She and her husband Raoul have no idea what lies in store.

WARNINGS: Mutha fuckin’ SPACE EELS. Ben Lewis is an anaconda. There is a murder in the film but there is literally no blood. Attempted suicide. Love angles abound. 

RATING: My anaconda don’t want none unless you got a son, hon.

OBLIGATORY DISCLAIMER: All reviews are done solely for humor and should not be taken seriously ever. If you cannot handle cursing, crude humor and probably some offensive things, pls do not read this.

Keep reading

Reviews for #WonderWoman Bottom line: #WonderWoman is the female-led superhero movie girls & women need AND deserve. I can’t wait for you all to see it. 💗

— Kayti Burt (@kaytiburt) May 19, 2017

Loved WONDER WOMAN. She reminds me of Christopher Reeve’s Superman: true north superhero w/ no angst or cynicism, which is needed right now.

— Mike Ryan (@mikeryan) May 19, 2017

WONDER WOMAN is great. My favorite of the recent DC movies. It’s fierce, funny, well-written and badass. @GalGadot owns it. Her lasso FTW pic.twitter.com/rQ0ufZxWXP

— ErikDavis (@ErikDavis) May 19, 2017

#WonderWoman is the ray of light the DCEU has been waiting for. Gal Gadot just owns it.

— Angie J. Han (@ajhan) May 19, 2017

My ❤ swelled at how fantastic WONDER WOMAN is. @PattyJenks keen eye for detail will make comic fans rejoice & bow down cuz @GalGadot is a 👸!

— Yolanda Machado (@SassyMamainLA) May 19, 2017

Happy to report ‘Wonder Woman’ is a blast and @GalGadot is fantastic. Her chemistry with Chris Pine is magnetic. Absolutely recommended. pic.twitter.com/VPW4QW3IhM

— Steven Weintraub (@colliderfrosty) May 19, 2017

I’m finally allowed to say it: I loved #WonderWoman! I teared up watching her fight. The Amazons kick ass! #SheIsWonderWoman @PattyJenks <3

— JennaBusch (@JennaBusch) May 19, 2017

Wonder Woman is the DC movie I’ve been waiting for. It’s exciting, inspiring, funny, and has some truly awe-inspiring action scenes.

— Germain Lussier (@GermainLussier) May 19, 2017

Very pleased to report that #WonderWoman is the best DC movie since THE DARK KNIGHT. I’m already looking forward to seeing it again.

— Silas Lesnick (@silaslesnick) May 19, 2017

WONDER WOMAN: Easily my favorite DCEU film. Has the humor and heart the franchise so desperately needs. Gadot and Pine are charming as hell.

— Kate Erbland (@katerbland) May 19, 2017

I’m tagging cause I want all of you to see this. Annie is an amazing movie and they remake is great I’ve gone and seen it three times.

And people aren’t seeing it cause annie is black and she’s meant to be white with red hair. Cause that’s how it was in the original.

But it’s a fricking remake and it’s set in the twenty first century the little girl they got to play Annie kills it.

If you want to go see a great family movie please go see this one it’s getting bad reviews because people are being racist.

I mean I’m as pale as you can get with blue eyes brown hair (red atm) I’ve got lots of people I can look up to who look like me. I don’t need to see more movies with people who look like me.

But this is so important this is a little girl who now feels comfortable because she saw a movie where the girl was like her.