november 1896

6

Celebrating William Morris’s Birthday Anniversary on Fine Press Friday!

The celebrated designer, writer, artist, leader of the Arts & Crafts movement, and founder of the Kelmscott Press, William Morris, was born on this day March 24, 1834. While there are several Kelmscott imprints we could use to mark this day, we’ve decided to demonstrate his continuing influence by showcasing Neil Shaver’s 1989 Yellow Barn Press printing of Frank Colebrook’s lecture William Morris: Master-Printer, printed at Council Bluffs, Iowa, with original wood engravings by the legendary John DePol, in 13 pt. Poliphilus and Blado Italic on Rives Heavy paper in an edition of 155 copies.

Frank Colebrook, editor of The Printing Times and Lithographer, delivered this lecture on November 27, 1896 – two months after Morris’s death – to the students of the Printing School of the St. Bride Foundation Institute in London. Shaver’s printing of the lecture is the first since 1897. Morris scholar William S. Peterson provided the introduction for this edition.

Our copy belonged to the distinguished librarian, author, book collector, Morris scholar, and UW graduate Jack Walsdorf, and bears signed presentation inscriptions to him from Shaver, DePol, and Peterson, and also includes a signed note to Walsdorf from John DePol.

View more of our posts on William Morris and his influence.

View more Fine Press Friday posts.

youtube

Rare video from Buenaventura Durruti’s funeral in Barcelona attended by half a million anarchists.

Rare newsreel footage from José Buenaventura Durruti Dumange’s (14 July 1896 – 20 November 1936) funeral in Barcelona, attended by more than half a million anarchists.

He died on 20 November 1936, at the age of 40, in a makeshift operating theatre set up in what was formerly the Ritz Hotel. The bullet was lodged in the heart; the diagnosis recorded was “death caused by pleural haemorrhage”. The doctors wrote a report in which the path of the bullet and the character of the wound was recorded but not the calibre of the bullet, since no autopsy was performed to remove it.

His driver’s gave the following testimonial about the events that lead to his death: “We passed a little group of hotels which are at the bottom of this avenue [Avenida de la Reina Victoria] and we turned towards the right. Arriving at the big street, we saw a group of militiamen coming towards us. Durruti thought it was some young men who were leaving the front. This area was completely destroyed by the bullets coming from the Clinical Hospital, which had been taken during these days by the Moors and which dominated all the environs. Durruti had me stop the car which I parked in the angle of one of those little hotels as a precaution. Durruti got out of the auto and went towards the militiamen. He asked them where they were going. As they didn’t know what to say, he ordered them to return to the front. The militiamen obeyed and Durruti returned towards the car. The rain of bullets became stronger. From the vast red heap of the clinical hospital, the Moors and the Guardia Civil were shooting furiously. Reaching the door of the machine, Durruti collapsed, a bullet through his chest.”

— It is we the workers who built these palaces and cities, here in Spain and in America and everywhere. We, the workers. We can build others to take their place. And better ones! We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth. There is not the slightest doubt about that. The bourgeoisie might blast and ruin its own world before it leaves the stage of history. We carry a new world here, in our hearts. That world is growing in this minute.
— Buenaventura Durruti -

Today in labor history, November 20, 1896: Rose Pesotta – union organizer, anarchist, and vice president of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union – is born. Pesotta began working in a shirtwaist factory in New York in 1913 and there became involved with ILGWU Local 25. She went on to organize tirelessly for the union around the country and in 1934 was elected vice president of the ILGWU, the first woman to hold that position. [Photo: Pesotta taken into custody during the 1941 Los Angeles garment strike; she was charged with battery of a police officer.]

youtube
Rare footage from Buenaventura Durruti’s funeral in Barcelona attended by half a million anarchists.          

Rare newsreel footage from José Buenaventura Durruti Dumange’s (14 July 1896 – 20 November 1936) funeral in Barcelona, attended by more than half a million anarchists.

He died on 20 November 1936, at the age of 40, in a makeshift operating theatre set up in what was formerly the Ritz Hotel. The bullet was lodged in the heart; the diagnosis recorded was “death caused by pleural haemorrhage”. The doctors wrote a report in which the path of the bullet and the character of the wound was recorded but not the calibre of the bullet, since no autopsy was performed to remove it.

His driver’s gave the following testimonial about the events that lead to his death: “We passed a little group of hotels which are at the bottom of this avenue [Avenida de la Reina Victoria] and we turned towards the right. Arriving at the big street, we saw a group of militiamen coming towards us. Durruti thought it was some young men who were leaving the front. This area was completely destroyed by the bullets coming from the Clinical Hospital, which had been taken during these days by the Moors and which dominated all the environs. Durruti had me stop the car which I parked in the angle of one of those little hotels as a precaution. Durruti got out of the auto and went towards the militiamen. He asked them where they were going. As they didn’t know what to say, he ordered them to return to the front. The militiamen obeyed and Durruti returned towards the car. The rain of bullets became stronger. From the vast red heap of the clinical hospital, the Moors and the Guardia Civil were shooting furiously. Reaching the door of the machine, Durruti collapsed, a bullet through his chest.”

— It is we the workers who built these palaces and cities, here in Spain and in America and everywhere. We, the workers. We can build others to take their place. And better ones! We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth. There is not the slightest doubt about that. The bourgeoisie might blast and ruin its own world before it leaves the stage of history. We carry a new world here, in our hearts. That world is growing in this minute.
— Buenaventura Durruti -