nouveau style

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HELLO TUNGLE!!

I’m so sorry I’ve been absent lately, guys! It’s been a combination of work I can’t talk about + my laptop being out of commission. Posting from mobile is a really uncomfortable experience, which is why I’ve been more active on my Twitter and Instagram

Anyway, I have some Good Boys™ for your enjoyment here! If you’d like to grab prints, you can do so on my shop. I never posted the full page of Bucky, so I’m excited to finally show him off! 

As requested by @storystereo

In the 1920′s women’s fashion changed radically. The war is over and there’s a relative feeling of times only getting better. The classic idea of having long hair is gone and society gets more looser and acceptable.

It must be noted that cutting the hair all short wasn’t done by everyone, coming from the long Edwardian looks, cutting of all of it wasn’t an easy decision. Many women cut their hair shoulder length. The bob is the most stylish hairdo, faking it was normal. Wild curls and hairpins were a woman’s best friend.

Women with naturally straight hair and an even more wilde spirit cut their hair short and banned the curls. 

Art nouveau and Art Déco inspired accessoires like the headbands still exist, but wearing large hats is very out of style. Small hats are the way to go in the roaring twenties. Finger waves already existed before the war and are still an acceptable style.

It must be noted that styles were different from region/country and still even class.

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I’ve always adored the Art Nouveau style, but lately i find myself drawn to it even more, especially the works of Gustav Klimt, Renè Lalique and Tiffany & Co.

With the world growing increasingly terrifying and bleak, Art Nouveau gives me a welcome break. Its so vibrant and uplifting. I think it stems from my childhood obsession with all the elves from LOTR. I find the style incredibly comforting and soothing.

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Day Dress

Girolamo Giuseffi

c.1906

The appliquéd and cutout stylized flowers—either peonies or plum blossoms—are drawn in an Art Nouveau style, which was prevalent from 1890 to 1914. The dramatic sleeve silhouette along with the great amount of ruching and hand pin tucking throughout the bodice and skirt make this a very expensive garment, perhaps part of a trousseau.

The period from 1900 until the outbreak of World War I in 1914 was an era of beautiful, extravagant, and ultra-feminine clothes. The high-collared bodice and the soft, draping trained skirt were worn over an S-shaped corset. The corset pushed the bust forward and the hips backward, creating an S-curve in the silhouette of the body.

Indianapolis Museum of Art