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A genetic fluke stood in the way of love for a lonely, unique garden snail named Jeremy.

But against all odds, and thanks to a global search, Jeremy has hopefully found a mate (or two).

Jeremy is a “lefty” snail, meaning his shell swirls counterclockwise and his sex organs are on the left side of his head. He’s a mirror image of other members of his species — and he wouldn’t be able to mate with normal snails because their reproductive organs wouldn’t line up.

He could be one in a million, evolutionary geneticist Angus Davison of the University of Nottingham tells The Two-Way, though scientists are now thinking it’s a trait likely found in one out of every 100,000 snails.

Can’t Hurry Love: Rare Snail Finds Romance After Global Search

Photo: Angus Davison
Caption: Rare snail Jeremy (left) meets a potential mate named Lefty.

phys.org
Observable Universe contains ten times more galaxies than previously thought
"It boggles the mind that over 90% of the galaxies in the Universe have yet to be studied. Who knows what interesting properties we will find when we observe these galaxies with the next generation of telescopes," explains Christopher Conselice about the far-reaching implications of the new results.

Astronomers using data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescopes and other telescopes have performed an accurate census of the number of galaxies in the Universe. The group came to the surprising conclusion that there are at least 10 times as many galaxies in the observable Universe as previously thought. The results have clear implications for our understanding of galaxy formation, and also help solve an ancient astronomical paradox—why is the sky dark at night?

One of the most fundamental questions in astronomy is that of just how many galaxies the Universe contains. The Hubble Deep Field images, captured in the mid 1990s, gave the first real insight into this. Myriad faint galaxies were revealed, and it was estimated that the observable Universe contains about 100 billion galaxies. Now, an international team, led by Christopher Conselice from the University of Nottingham, UK, have shown that this figure is at least ten times too low.

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