notebook magazine

22 • 07 • 17

i’m currently on my summer holiday right now which means a lot of time i didn’t have before, so i’m doing a lot of reading. my favourite thing to buy at the airport is a copy of monocle, and this month’s issue featured a list of the world’s 25 most liveable cities, with tokyo topping it. i’ve always dreamed of going to japan and staying in the capital and generally having the time of my life. i’ve also dreamed of being able to speak/read/write at least five languages by the time i’m thirty, hopefully seven in total one day. i’ve committed to learning japanese during my break, brushing up my mandarin alongside, to get that little bit closer to living in japan (and watching anime without subs hehe). i will share snippets of my japanese journey on here. if anyone has any good websites or videos, they would be most appreciated! let’s do this!

ig: @parisiemme 

2.2.17 Just a quick shot from my local stationery shop! I absolutely love it here and I keep having to forcibly remove myself. It’s right next to the green grocers so I walk past it every time I get vegetables! I honestly might see if I can get a job here because, having a studyblr, a know a lot about stationery. Xxx emily

Inktober Challenge, Day 30. 

Out. 

From Dusky’s beautiful Edit

Sakura Pigma Micron 005 and ShinHanArt Touch Twin Marker (CoolGray 1, CoolGray3 and 120 Black)

My Inktober Tag

HOW TO CREATE A MINDFUL STUDY SPACE

so i see a lot of pictures of gorgeous study spaces on tumblr and they’re all perfect. but for those of us who are a bit messier, more disorganised, creating a study space that’s so pretty and picturesque might feel a bit unrealistic. but fear not! for i am here to give you a quick guide on how to create a study space that is organised and mindful. 

define: mindful means being fully aware of your surroundings and avoiding going autopilot. but it also suggests an idea of tranquillity and thoughtfulness. by a mindful study space, then, i mean creating an environment that fosters productivity, promotes thoughtfulness and creativity, and does not distract you from your work. everything should have a place, and everything has a purpose.

things that you might need:

  • some basic filing accessories, for pieces of paper and notebooks. magazine holders are good for notebooks, ring-binders and files, and you might want to get a paper-tray if you have lots of lose paper lying around. try cheap ones from Ikea, or some nicer ones from Muji. you could even make some from cereal boxes.
  • a way to store pens and pencils. there are loads of stationery organisers on amazon, or you could use glass jars, or mugs. 
  • some postcards, or photos, for an inspiration wall. i have found zazzle to be a great resource, and there are loads of sites that gives you free photo prints. i also recommend printing off a calendar.
  • perhaps a cute little plant! i obviously highly recommend a succulent. i get mine from local gardening stores.
  • or some nice tealights! they make me feel calm.
  • a glass of water, or something else to drink. but not soda. if your desk is nice, you might want a coaster.

what you need to do:

  • take everything off your desk. literally everything. pick up every notebook, every scrap of paper, and put it on the floor. keep going until your desk is completely empty. then, divide the pile up between work and stuff. so a hand out from a lecture will go in the ‘work’ pile, and a stapler would go in the ‘stuff’ pile.
  • clean your desk. get a rag and some washing up liquid and wipe down your desk. i was amazed by all the dust and grime there was on mine. it was gross.
  • create your inspiration wall. i would say do this now rather than later, because your desk should be clear so you don’t need to worry about knocking everything over. don’t worry about it looking perfect - this is meant to be for your eyes only. you can find inspiration on pinterest or tumblr.
  • sort through all your ‘stuff’. pick up each thing in turn, and ask it three questions: do you make me more creative? do you make me more productive? and do you make me feel inspired? if it answers yes to any of them, then it has earned a place on top of your desk. if not, then it needs to find a new home. only things that are related directly to your work should be on your desk - not even a hair brush. they’re just distractions.
  • organise the ‘stuff’ that is now on your desk. how you do this is completely up to you. but bear in mind that we are trying to create a mindful environment. keep everything organised, and purposefully think about the reason that you make each choice. so i put my favourite pens in glass jars, so i can move them closer to me when i’m studying. i put my other pens and pencils in a desk organizer, so they’re all in the same place. 
  • organise your ‘work’ carefully and give it a deliberate home. put the same subjects together. how you do this is completely up to you. 

tldr: the basic principle behind this post is that you should clean and de-clutter your desk, and only have things that you actually need on it to study. in so doing, you can create a study space that encourages productivity, and stops you from getting distracted.

coming soon in my MINDFUL series:

  • how to revise mindfully
  • how to study mindfully
  • how to live mindfully

• i just want to feel attractive today • motion city soundtrack

anonymous asked:

Do you have any advice for a first time flyer? Tips for going through the process, the long flight, and exiting the airport/picking up your luggage and all specifically that would have helped you in hindsight? I have a trip coming up and I'm slightly nervous even after googling tips since I'll likely be flying alone. Thanks ^^

As someone who has flown more than a bit before, and usually by myself, I will give you The Sudden Adult’s Guide to Surviving Plane Trips ™.

Checking In:

  • For most flights, you can “check in” as early as 24 hours before your flight. This will allow you to print your boarding pass at home/library/etc. and cut some of the time you’d be wasting standing in a long-ass line waiting to print your ticket. Gotta love technology.
  • Check your flight the morning of, or a few hours, before you’re scheduled to leave for the airport. Make sure the time hasn’t changed due to weather/mechanical issues/etc. No one wants to arrive at the airport to find out their fucking flight was delayed 5 hours and they now have to wait at a crappy airport coffee shop.
  • Get dropped off at the terminal for your flight. The best way to ensure this is to have a general idea of where your terminal will be. You don’t have to be dropped off there, but it saves you from walking and dragging your luggage down to your airline’s bag check.

Luggage Tips:

  • TIP YOUR BAG PERSON. That person who you drop your luggage off with when you arrive at the airport? Tip them. I usually give $5 per bag. A nice tip and friendly attitude ensures your bag arrives at its destination (usually).
  • If you have a black/brown/gray suitcase, try making it stand out. Usually I see people tie ribbons to the handles. Personally, I have a lime green ribbon and a pink skull luggage tag that are hard to miss (but then, my regular suitcase is also metallic, so it’s a pleasant eyesore).
  • Put luggage tags on your suitcase and carry-on. Make sure your information on the tags is up-to-date. In case your shit goes missing, you want to give the airport a way of finding you.
  • Know what your airline considers a carry-on size. Sometimes airlines will change the carry-on requirements because why not do things to piss off passengers? Check by calling the airline directly or Googling “What is a carry-on bag + name of airline.” Usually you are allowed one carry-on and one personal bag (purse/backpack/laptop case).

TSA/Security Tips:

  • Know the 3-1-1 rule and follow it. Keep your tiny liquids bag in an easily-accessible front or side pocket so you can whip it out without digging through your bag. Same goes for laptops. Make it easy to pull out, because it will have to go in a bin by itself.
  • Wear shoes that easily slip on and off, because you will have to take them off to go through security. Also, wear socks, because who knows what the fuck’s on that airport floor.
  • Take any coats/hoodies off while you wait in line. TSA agents will ask you to take these off anyway, so might as well save the people behind you some time. Same goes for any jewelry, belts, or cellphones that will set off the metal detector. Put them in a pocket of your carry-on.
  • Pay attention to the line when it moves. As a (former) frequent flyer, I cannot explain how annoying it is to be stuck in a line behind someone who is not paying attention. Don’t be that person.
  • Also, if you’re not a frequent flyer, do not get in the experienced flyer line. We can smell the inexperience.
  • Keep your ID and ticket (and passport, if required) easily accessible on your person. This will make going through any additional security nice and easy for you.

Airport Tips:

  • Find out where your terminal is, then worry about getting food or drink. Nothing is more stressful than finally getting your $20 sandwich and then having to run around a large airport trying to find your terminal. Find your terminal and then embark on the search for food.
  • Do not leave your bags unattended. This should really speak for itself.
  • Pee before you fly. Like Ma always said, use the loo before you fly, boo…especially if you need to poo.
  • Good fucking luck finding a place to charge your phone/laptop/nintendo 3DS if you’re flying out during a busy time (holidays, weekends, etc.). Solve the problem by charging these things the night before you leave.

Plane Tips:

  • Put your carry-on in the overhead bin that’s near your seat. If you have anything in there that you might want during the flight (magazine, notebook, etc.), consider getting it out before you get on the plane.
  • Sit in the seat you’ve been assigned. Unless it’s a Southwest flight (which lets passengers choose their own seats upon boarding), your ticket will say where you’ll sit. Sit there. Don’t be the seat-stealing prick of the plane.
  • If you’re nervous, listen to the flight attendant at the beginning. They will explain all regular and emergency procedures. Sometimes knowing how to survive if shit hits the fan can make you feel better.
  • If you think you may  feel sick during the flight, try chewing mint-flavored gum. Gum also helps with you ears popping. If the flight serves drinks, request something soothing like ginger ale. If not, buy a $3 bottle of lemon-lime soda from a place in the airport. My personal experience is that ginger ale solves all flight sickness (or maybe that’s a placebo effect, I don’t know and don’t care, because I like ginger ale).
  • Don’t get up when the flight attendant brings out the little drink cart. There’s never a way around it, so just sit tight until it passes you if you need to get up and pee.
  • Try getting to know your seat neighbor(s), if you’re comfortable with that. Last time I flew, I had an interesting discussion with the old dude sitting next to me about the status of the US economy.

Landing & Leaving:

  • BRACE YOURSELF! Sort of kidding, but if you’re like me and planes make you nauseous, you might want to prepare yourself (I know that I personally feel most sick during turbulence and landing).
  • Don’t bother rushing to get up and stand. The damn plane’s not going to take off again while you’re still on it, so chill out and take your time. If you’re on a flight that’s part of a connecting flight, they’ll usually ask passengers who need to leave to make their next flight to get off first. Some people are jerks and will pretend just so they can leave slightly sooner than others.
  • Be careful when you open the overhead bin. They aren’t kidding when they say stuff may have shifted around. I once saw a lady get beaned on the forehead by her kid’s carry-on.
  • Make your way to the baggage claim. If you have to pee, do it now, because luggage can take a while, so you might as well empty your bladder while you can. And if you’re lost, just follow the people form your plane, or ask someone who looks like an airport employee.
  • Stand around the luggage carousel and wait for your bag. A lot of people crowd around the opening, but you can stand out and wait near the end. The bags go around in circles for fucks sake, so it’s not like you only have one chance to grab your bag. Also, double-check that it is your bag.
  • Check that your ride knows when and where to pick you up. Let them know your flight number, arrival time, and terminal so they can be on the lookout. Pick someone reliable (I’ve been left waiting before, I can tell you it sucks ass).

So…yep. That’s all the tips I can think of.

-The Sudden Adult

PS. If you’re gonna fly, don’t let your arms get tired! HA. HA. HA.