not-khamas

Amma Asante to direct David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike in ‘United Kingdom’

The script tells the true story of Seretse Khama, a member of the royal family in the country of Bechuanaland, a former English colony and south African nation that would one day become Botswana, with Khama serving as the country’s first president. But prior to that, Khama sparked international outrage when he married a white woman in 1948. He survived a deposition attempt by his uncle, only to face opposition from South Africa, where interracial marriage was illegal, which forced Great Britain to ban him from his home country in 1951.

hollywoodreporter.com
'Belle' Filmmaker to Direct David Oyelowo, Rosamund Pike in 'A United Kingdom' (Exclusive)
Amma Asante has come aboard to direct A United Kingdom, a racial drama that has David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike in negotiations to star.
By Borys Kit

Amma Asante has come aboard to direct A United Kingdom, a racial drama that has David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike in negotiations to star.

Pathe International is financing and is one of the production companies behind the project, which is eyeing an October start.

Written by Guy Hibbert, the script tells the true story of Seretse Khama, a member of the royal family in the country of Bechuanaland, a former English colony and south African nation that would one day become Botswana, with Khama serving as the country’s first president. But prior to that, Khama sparked international outrage when he married a white woman in 1948. He survived a deposition attempt by his uncle, only to face opposition from South Africa, where interracial marriage was illegal, which forced Great Britain to ban him from his home country in 1951.

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Khama is a fashion company working with local women in Kasungu, a town in Malawi. Pictured here in traditional Malawian Chitenge skirts, these women attend Khama’s training workshops in tailoring and fashion production. As a social enterprise operating in a developing country, the business has to constantly adapt to practical challenges. The electricity supply can be out for days or hours at a time, so Khama use foot-powered manual sewing machines to prevent stalling production.

Agogo, the oldest group member, used to be a tobacco farmer. She wanted to work with Khama as field-work was physically very demanding and meant she had to travel far away from her children and grandchildren. The Khama workshop is nearer her home, provides a more regular income and enables her to develop her own business.

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

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16 Most Anticipated Movies of 2016

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A United Kingdom dir. Amma Asante
Notable stars: David Oyelowo, Rosamund Pike
Plot:  A period biopic about Prince Seretse Khama of Botswana causing an international stir when he marries a white woman from London in the late 1940s.

Woodshock dir. Kate & Laura Mulleavy
Notable stars: Kirsten Dunst
Plot: A woman who falls deeper into paranoia after taking a deadly drug.

Zama dir. Lucrecia Martel
Notable stars: Daniel Giménez Cacho
Plot:  Set in Argentina toward the end of the 18th century, just before the independence movements Don Diego de Zama , an officer of the Spanish Crown, awaits a promotion and transfer to Buenos Aires that never comes. Forced to accept submissively every task entrusted to him by successive Governors, he joins a a party of soldiers that go after a dangerous bandit.

The Zookeeper’s Wife dir. Niki Caro
Notable stars: Jessica Chastain, Daniel Brühl
Plot: Keepers of the Warsaw Zoo, Jan and Antonina Zabinski, help save hundreds of people and animals during the Nazi invasion of Poland.

1-4, 5-8, 9-12,

Who knew the power of love ultimately won independence for the democratic republic of Botswana? I sure didn’t. But this is the based-on-a-true-story film writer Guy Hibbert and director Amma Asante have delivered with A United Kingdom. It’s a tale of racial segregation, politically driven cowardice, and the heart prevailing over fear as two kindred spirits choose to write their own destinies. Ruth Williams (Rosamund Pike) couldn’t know the London-based missionary event her sister dragged her to would change her life forever. Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo) couldn’t have predicted in his wildest dreams the ramifications for his homeland Bechuanaland that asking her to dance would inflict. And it’s doubtful anyone would expect his amateur boxer/philosopher to reveal himself as an African prince.

Ruth and Seretse’s romance is one we’ve seen before: an interracial relationship alienating family, earning bigoted remarks in public, and showing how love trumps all. What it possesses that’s unique is a vantage point often left unconsidered. Since white America creates many of these love stories, we forget there are two sides to the prejudice. Hollywood’s white guilt makes it so we expect Ruth’s parents to forsake her decision and ignorant bystanders to pick fights. A segregated London is no different and both do occur. But don’t assume her reception in Bechuanaland will prove better. She isn’t just a white Brit entering a colony on the arm of a black man. She’s a white queen meant to represent a tribe of black women she doesn’t know or understand.

Continue reading our TIFF review of A United Kingdom.

“The Palestinians voted for Hamas, so they obviously don’t want peace”

Yeah, and the Israelis voted in Netenyahu 4 separate times, Ariel Sharon even AFTER he was found personally responsible for the massacre of civilians in Sabra and Shatila and was forced to resign from his position as minister of defense, on TOP of his role in the Qibya massacre, Menachim Begin who was a notorious terrorist who slaughtered Palestinian civilians in the ethnic cleansing operation carried out to “found” the Israeli state, Yithak Rabin who ordered massacres of entire villages, wanting them to be literally wiped out, and numerous other Israeli leaders involved in massacres against Palestinians

Combined, they have personally murdered more innocent Palestinian civilians than Hamas could ever hope to….and yet, they went on to become lauded and esteemed leaders of Israel loved around the world, and in some cases serve multiple terms.

But hey you know, KHAMAS!!

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The 19 Films I Wish Would Play at Cannes 2016 - Part 4
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Toni Erdmann directed by Maren Ade
Plot: A man begins to play pranks on his grown daughter who he thinks is too serious.
Cannes connection: None however Ade’s last film was a Jury Grand Prix at the Berlin Film Festival.

A United Kingdom directed by Amma Asante
Plot: The real life love story between Botswanan prince Seretse Khama and his English wife Ruth Williams. 
Cannes connection: None. Asante and her team have much stronger ties with TIFF, but after her breakthrough with Belle it would be nice to have her garner some attention with a more prestigious festival. 

Woodshock directed by Kate and Laura Mulleavy
Plot: A woman falls into paranoia after consuming a mysterious drug.
Cannes connection: The design team turned directing duo have none themselves, however star Kirsten Dunst won Best Actress at Cannes in 2012.

Zama directed by Lucrecia Martel
Plot: Toward the end of the 18th century Don Diego de Zama joins a party of soldiers to go after a dangerous bandit.
Cannes connection: Martel has strong ties to Cannes. She was a Cinéfondation fellow and her 2004 film The Holy Girl as well as her 2008 filmThe Headless Woman both played In Comp at Cannes.

Token Slot directed by any male director
This list is in part a response to similar lists made by widely read publications by industry professionals who are only able to cough up one token slot for a film directed by a woman. It often seems like no effort at all was even put in to selecting this woman’s film, just that they realized that they should probably have at least one and included the first one they could think of. In honour of the token woman slot I include the token man slot. Feel free to imagine the male filmmaker of your choice here.
Cannes connection: Cannes favours male directors so probably strong.

New blog post: I’ve written a post about the true story of Ruth Williams and Prince Seretse Khama, who inspired Amma Asante’s new film A United Kingdom! The film stars Rosamund Pike and David Oyelowo and is released in the UK on Friday 25th! 

I saw a preview of the film last month and was immediately captivated by the story. It’s such a beautiful, powerful and moving film, I absolutely recommend it so please go to see it if you get the chance! :)

anonymous asked:

You're a fucking idiot we don't need to see Khama khan celebrate Christmas with her friends. She's MUSLIM there's no need for the fucking bullshit. Stop commenting your worthless opinions on other people's posts. Fucking dumbass.

You know why I love Kamala Khan?  Because she is like me.  She is young and idealistic and she’s a fangirl and she’s a religious minority and she doesn’t hesitate to stand up for what she believes in (among other things).

Unlike Kamala, I am not Muslim, I’m Jewish.  100% Jewish on both sides of my family.  You know something both of those religions have in common?  No Christmas.  and you know what?  I fucking LOVE Christmas.  I love the music, I love the decorations, I love the food.  and I’ve never had the opportunity to celebrate it with someone else.  If anyone invited me, I would jump at the chance to celebrate with them.  Because my family doesn’t celebrate it and it would be super awesome to get to take part in other people’s traditions on such an important and fun holiday.

A lot of Kamala’s internal struggles are about her finding a balance between American culture and her culture.  This time of year, Christmas is a big part of American culture.  It’s so easy for me to see her feeling the same about Christmas as I do: thinking it looks like so much fun, but unsure of what it really is and feeling wrong for even wanting to celebrate it since it isn’t one of her holidays.

Even if she doesn’t feel that way, how dare you suggest that she wouldn’t say yes, that she’d turn down a heartfelt invitation to experience someone else’s culture and traditions.  No, we don’t need to see her celebrating Christmas, no more than we need to see her inviting friends to celebrate Eid, but who says we shouldn’t?  I want to see her asking questions, listening while someone tells her the christmas story, learning a family recipe from someone’s grandmother (or aunt).  I’m not saying she should star in a Christmas special, but I don’t see anything wrong with someone inviting her home to celebrate after she’s worked very hard to keep the world safe.

post the ask was in response to