not-appropriate

We don’t know Miley Cyrus and we don’t know how she really feels, but the narrative she’s been creating is not one that suggests respect or a deep understanding of the humanity of black artists. Instead, it’s a narrative in which she uses black culture as a prop when it is convenient to her, and when it’s not, she throws it away. That’s not a narrative she can win.
Question for everyone today

(Please respond on this post, or in my inbox!)
I’ve been very invested in learning Japanese, and I’ve always wanted to incorporate the language (not any deities, not any traditions, holidays, dress, anything, JUST the language) (maybe incorporating hiragana, katakana, and Kanji as parts of sigils and spells, or writing pretty Japanese quotes I love in my grimoire) (nothing but the language)

Would that be culturally appropriative, or would that be okay, do you think? My decision doesn’t full on rest on the results of this post, just… looking for feedback.

Thanks, y'all!

Listen up people.

When a native person tells you that you are committing appropriation you listen, correct yourself, learn from it and move on.

You do not make excuses or say “but my native friend says it’s okay”

It is not okay. Period.

That so called native friend (even if they are real in the first place) is wrong. Their dumb ass don’t know any better because they are most likely fully colonized.

There is a whole mix of natives out there some that don’t know anything about their origins, some fake ones that claim to be part of a nation, there are natives that go along with Settlers with things to appease them and continue the hurtfulness of colonialism.

Then there are natives that share our culture in a respectful manner through teachings and exchanges. So there’s a whole spectrum of us. Some good some bad.

But the whole point of this post is. Do not ever use the excuse “my native friend said it’s okay” they do not speak for the 500+ nations in North America. They certainly do not speak for me.

Even if one native person said they are offended. You should stop what you are doing and listen. It’s a learning moment for everyone.

If you continue to do the stupid shit you got called out for, you’re an ignorant racist that doesn’t know their mouth from their ass, and should expect a shitstorm of hate coming to you promptly. There will be no mercy for your ignorance.

Thank you for listening to my rant.

(PS this does apply to cultural appropriation of any other race too, so if you see it happening please help out and speak up)

2

These white cooks bragged about stealing recipes from Mexico to start a Portland business

  • There’s a long simmering conversation in the food world about cultural appropriation — about who’s allowed to cook what, and why — but it’s usually a tad more subtle than what Kali Wilgus and Liz “LC” Connelly confessed to Willamette Week in Portland, Oregon.
  • Wilgus and Connelly were profiled by Willamette Week about the delicious handmade tortillas they sell out of a food truck called Kooks Burritos on Cesar Chavez Boulevard in Portland. The duo said they learned their craft from women in Puerto Nuevo, Mexico.
  • “I picked the brains of every tortilla lady there in the worst broken Spanish ever, and they showed me a little of what they did,” Connelly told Willamette Week. “They told us the basic ingredients, and we saw them moving and stretching the dough similar to how pizza makers do before rolling it out with rolling pins. They wouldn’t tell us too much about technique, but we were peeking into the windows of every kitchen, totally fascinated by how easy they made it look. We learned quickly it isn’t quite that easy.”
  • The problem, of course, is that it’s unclear whether the Mexican women who handed over their recipes ever got anything in return. And now those same recipes are being sold as a delicacy in Portland.  Read more (5/19/17)

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4

On Cinco de Mayo, here’s how not to be a racist

Cinco de Mayo: a holiday known for oversized sombreros, mouth-wateringly delicious tacos, one too many margaritas and racism.

Every fifth of May, Mexicans and Mexican-Americans prepare for yet another day of cultural appropriation, racist jokes and perhaps a tweet or two from President Donald Trump about his long-promised border wall.

As a fourth-generation Mexican-American, I’m hoping 2017 is the year we, as a community, put an end to the appropriation and degradation of an entire culture. This Cinco de Mayo, know the difference between cultural appropriation and cultural appreciation in order to make this “holiday” enjoyable for everyone.

Before you go out and drink as many Coronas as you can, try to get a basic knowledge of what you’re “celebrating.” Frequently confused with Mexico’s independence day, which is Sept. 16, Cinco de Mayo commemorates an unforeseen victory by the Mexican army against the French at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. Puebla is located in east-central Mexico and is one of the 31 states that makes up the country.

And, while Cinco de Mayo in America is widely interpreted as a celebration of Mexican culture, the lack of appreciation for Mexican heritage, the historical significance of the event itself, and the influx of racial stereotypes has transformed the holiday into an almost unbearable occasion for anyone of Mexican descent.

Rather than subjugate Mexicans and Mexican Americans to yet another year of cultural appropriation and lack of appreciation, read up on ways you can help celebrate our beautiful heritage — and ways to help avoid further degradation of an entire culture. Read more (Opinion)

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this crop top is 100% @zephyrine-gale and @keilattes fault

3

Aboriginal activist calls Chanel’s new $1325 boomerang “so wrong it is almost absurd”

  • A cool $1325 can bag you Chanel’s new spring-summer 2017 pre-collection wood & resin black boomerang. Absurd? Perhaps. Unthinkable? Hardly. Offensive? To some.
  • The high-priced luxury good (which Chanel has been selling in various iterations since 2004) first made the rounds on Monday, after makeup artist Jeffree Star Instagrammed his affection for the new product.
  • Over 160K people ‘liked’ the post with over 5,000 comments, many saying the brand appropriated indigenous Australian culture.“
  • As someone who lives in Australia and has been taught about discrimination toward Aboriginals, this is ethically wrong,” wrote @actually.james. Read more (5/16/17)

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Can Tumblr Just Stop

Listen up y’all! Because when it comes to this topic:

Originally posted by blackbeak

I have had it with people saying you can’t enjoy something that doesn’t ‘belong’ to your culture. Apparently you’re racist if you’re a white girl dressing up as Tiana for comic con. Or if you’re wanting to adapt a story from China into a blockbuster movie. Or if you’re trying to cook an ethnic meal even if you have no experience. Because according to Tumblr (and alarmingly a lot of colleges) it’s ‘culture appropriation’ to even be curious about another country. Seriously. I had to write a paper to explain that you can still enjoy Mexican food even if you’re not from Mexico. And people argued with me. My professor argued with me! They all claimed that if you enjoy food from other cultures that you were stealing from that culture! Really?

I see this kind of attitude all the time about media too. Like, people flip out when they see a black girl playing Eponine from Les Miserables. Or when a predominately white school is performing The Wiz. People just jump into blind hate and claim that these performers are racists… but most of the time these performers are doing a role or a show because they love it. Because they connect with it in some way. 

Here’s a quote we all need to read:

“You don’t need to be the same ethnicity as the story you’re watching in order to identify with it. If the story is told well. It [a good story] is about relating to people that you may not necessarily think you’re going to relate to in the beginning, but by the end you’re going ‘That’s me.’ ”

You know who said that?

Lin-Manuel Miranda

AKA:

The guy who wrote In The Heights and Hamilton, which did WONDERS in including people of all different ethnicities in mainstream musicals. AND in the interview he said that he was inspired from when he saw Fiddler on the Roof when he was six years old. Even though he was Puerto Rican and the show was about Jews and Russia- he related to the story about the sacrifices you make for your family. Because that’s something that everyone can relate to.

In other words, a good story can speak to anyone regardless of culture and that’s okay!

It’s okay for a Japanese cast to perform In The Heights. It’s okay for an African American to play Éponine in Les Miserables. It’s okay for people to adapt a J-Pop song into English. And it’s okay for a predominately white school to perform Hamilton or The Wiz.

If people are doing something because they genuinely love it, then there is nothing wrong with that. And this applies to everything!!!

If you’re a white girl wanting to wear dreads in your hair because you think it looks cool- GO FOR IT! If you’re a Korean man who loves listening to Latin music- GREAT! If you’re an Irish kid obsessed with learning Japanese- AWESOME! If you’re British and want to try out for Hamilton- NICE! If you’re an African American who jams out to K-Dramas- SWEET! If you’re an American who has moved to South Africa because you want to learn more about local tribes- THAT’S SO COOL!

Look:

People shouldn’t be guilt tripped into staying in their own cultural norms. I hate it when people say “you can’t enjoy this thing because it belongs to another culture.”

Doesn’t that sound a bit racist? Scratch that. IT SOUNDS A LOT RACIST!

Yo, I can kinda see where the anger comes from. I know there are people who claim to know a lot about a different culture… when they obviously don’t by their actions or mistreatment to those who actually belong to that culture. But there is a HUGE difference between those who are being “entitled” and those who just haven’t learned enough yet. Learning about a different culture takes time! Man, it takes several years just to learn a different language. Much more to learn about social norms and values. 

And if they get a few things wrong… for crying out loud, show some mercy! No one is perfect. Stop with the “all or nothing” mentality. Show some compassion for those who genuinely want to know more about your amazing heritage/culture. 

Because most of the time these people are trying their best to learn! In fact, 99% of the time, they’re self conscious because they know they are an outsider to your thing. But you can teach them. Share your culture. Let it thrive! Give people a chance! If you treat outsiders harshly for learning and enjoying your culture, then you’re harming your own representation. 

THIS KID IS OUT!