not to sound racist but

Can Tumblr Just Stop

Listen up y’all! Because when it comes to this topic:

Originally posted by blackbeak

I have had it with people saying you can’t enjoy something that doesn’t ‘belong’ to your culture. Apparently you’re racist if you’re a white girl dressing up as Tiana for comic con. Or if you’re wanting to adapt a story from China into a blockbuster movie. Or if you’re trying to cook an ethnic meal even if you have no experience. Because according to Tumblr (and alarmingly a lot of colleges) it’s ‘culture appropriation’ to even be curious about another country. Seriously. I had to write a paper to explain that you can still enjoy Mexican food even if you’re not from Mexico. And people argued with me. My professor argued with me! They all claimed that if you enjoy food from other cultures that you were stealing from that culture! Really?

I see this kind of attitude all the time about media too. Like, people flip out when they see a black girl playing Eponine from Les Miserables. Or when a predominately white school is performing The Wiz. People just jump into blind hate and claim that these performers are racists… but most of the time these performers are doing a role or a show because they love it. Because they connect with it in some way. 

Here’s a quote we all need to read:

“You don’t need to be the same ethnicity as the story you’re watching in order to identify with it. If the story is told well. It [a good story] is about relating to people that you may not necessarily think you’re going to relate to in the beginning, but by the end you’re going ‘That’s me.’ ”

You know who said that?

Lin-Manuel Miranda

AKA:

The guy who wrote In The Heights and Hamilton, which did WONDERS in including people of all different ethnicities in mainstream musicals. AND in the interview he said that he was inspired from when he saw Fiddler on the Roof when he was six years old. Even though he was Puerto Rican and the show was about Jews and Russia- he related to the story about the sacrifices you make for your family. Because that’s something that everyone can relate to.

In other words, a good story can speak to anyone regardless of culture and that’s okay!

It’s okay for a Japanese cast to perform In The Heights. It’s okay for an African American to play Éponine in Les Miserables. It’s okay for people to adapt a J-Pop song into English. And it’s okay for a predominately white school to perform Hamilton or The Wiz.

If people are doing something because they genuinely love it, then there is nothing wrong with that. And this applies to everything!!!

If you’re a white girl wanting to wear dreads in your hair because you think it looks cool- GO FOR IT! If you’re a Korean man who loves listening to Latin music- GREAT! If you’re an Irish kid obsessed with learning Japanese- AWESOME! If you’re British and want to try out for Hamilton- NICE! If you’re an African American who jams out to K-Dramas- SWEET! If you’re an American who has moved to South Africa because you want to learn more about local tribes- THAT’S SO COOL!

Look:

People shouldn’t be guilt tripped into staying in their own cultural norms. I hate it when people say “you can’t enjoy this thing because it belongs to another culture.”

Doesn’t that sound a bit racist? Scratch that. IT SOUNDS A LOT RACIST!

Yo, I can kinda see where the anger comes from. I know there are people who claim to know a lot about a different culture… when they obviously don’t by their actions or mistreatment to those who actually belong to that culture. But there is a HUGE difference between those who are being “entitled” and those who just haven’t learned enough yet. Learning about a different culture takes time! Man, it takes several years just to learn a different language. Much more to learn about social norms and values. 

And if they get a few things wrong… for crying out loud, show some mercy! No one is perfect. Stop with the “all or nothing” mentality. Show some compassion for those who genuinely want to know more about your amazing heritage/culture. 

Because most of the time these people are trying their best to learn! In fact, 99% of the time, they’re self conscious because they know they are an outsider to your thing. But you can teach them. Share your culture. Let it thrive! Give people a chance! If you treat outsiders harshly for learning and enjoying your culture, then you’re harming your own representation. 

THIS KID IS OUT!

A taxonomy of gameplay videos on YouTube:

1. Player who can’t remember which button is “jump” spends twenty minutes repeatedly attempting the same wrong solution to the world’s easiest puzzle.

2. “Hilarious” quip-a-minute commentary from a guy who sounds like a racist, homophobic version of the parrot from Aladdin.

3. Fourth attempt at annoyingly difficult boss stymied when player character randomly falls through the ground.

4. Gritty combat sim modded so the hero is now a lightsabre-wielding Hatsune Miku riding Twilight Sparkle into battle against Thomas the Tank Engine.

5. Tool-assisted speed runner completes sixty-hour game in four minutes by glitching through the skybox to fight God.

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

full offense but if jeffree star actually felt bad about all his racist comments and was a changed person he would have apologized and addressed it YEARS ago rather than blocking anybody who calls him out and calling them derogatory names over it lol like sis,,,.. you’ve had 12 years? and ….NEVER thought to address this until now when suddenly its affecting your career? qwhite interesting :-)

5

Jesse! You silly, boy! If Gabe would know what you wanna do..

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10 | Part 11 | Part 12 | Part 13 | Part 14 (the end)

—-

About “rice eaters” remark:

I got messages accusing me/Jesse of racism because of the moment when Jesse called his opponents from Hanamura “Rice eaters”. I want you all to know, like I also did through a separate post, that I didn’t mean it to sound racist in any way. McCree didn’t see much until he joined Over/Blackwatch, reason for which he might be slightly narrow minded when it came to other cultures. Not because he disrespected them, but because he knew little. He was young and still learning. And I, by no means, am a racist. I love the Japanese culture and don’t have anything against any other culture or race. (and if you check my blog you will see that I truly have no limits or reasons to lie about this). I am sorry if some of you found it offensive/racist, but I had a reason for which I made the remark. 

More about this HERE.

—–

~ This comic will present the events that happened about 20 years before those from Rendezvous comic(linked below). Not to mention that this will reveal how Hanzo and Jesse met!~

Rendezvous comic:

Original post | Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10 (the end)

  • The Witch of the wilds: Jamison~ Jaaaaamisooon~ Your creation will destroy the village~
  • Dr Junkenstein: How do you know my name?!
  • Witch: Because I know all!
  • Junkenstein: Are you a witch?
  • Witch: Noo, no, I am just a little, uh…
  • The Reaper: *whispers in her ear* Raven
  • Witch: Raven! Tweet!
  • Junkenstein: Wait a minute… Ravens don’t go tweet!
  • Witch: Are you a raven? ARE YOU A RAVEN?!
  • Junkenstein: Uh no?
  • Witch: No. Then don’t tell us what we fucking sound like, racist!
  • Junkenstein: Oh… kaay?
  • Witch: Okay. Good. And don’t forget: Your monster’ll-
  • Junkenstein: destroy the village, got it.
  • submitted by grendinator
A kid started yelling that my grandma is a racist.

So my grandma works a few hours at a K-8th school as a campus supervisor. She was only supposed to let a certain amount of kids into the cafeteria so she was counting “one two”, “one two”, “one two”. One little kid starts copying her and she says “Heyy, you can count!”. I think it was a kindergartener so she was trying to be supportive.

Some 8th grader(s) walking by start yelling “DID YOU HEAR WHAT SHE SAID??? SHE’S RACIST! SHE’S RACIST! SHE’S RACIST!” and it was fucking insane. She had no idea what was going on. Instead of talking to those 8th graders, the school told that little kid that if he wanted to FILE THE INCIDENT, he could.

It was crazy and my grandma came home in tears.

Happy 20fucking17 everyone. Now you’ve got tumblr kids who scream everything is racist making grandmas cry. Congrats.

The whole story sounds made up, I know, because who the hell does that but unfortunately it really happened yesterday.

anonymous asked:

Can you explain to me the chubby mccree thing? where it comes from? why the fandom loves it so much? why there is no chubby hanzo? is because sushi is healthier than hamburger?

its mostly a personal preference, I feel he looks nice with some chub on him, and it goes well with my headcanon of him being a twig when he was rebellious teen in a gang, and then getting some muscle after coming to blackwatch and having regular meals and excersise routines and also having to be in shape for missions and such~~, and them becoming chubby as he grows older and is on the run, eating irregularly and mostly fast food or food from diners which are things he can eat quickly….also drinks alot which we can sorta see in the reflections comics…. idk I just feel he looks really nice like that.

As for Hanzo, I have seen a couple of peeps draw him chubby and I like that too, but in my headcanon, Hanzo is very strict about his diet and his workout routines that I dont see him allowing himself  be any other way…. idk he is a workout junkie in my hc because its something that keeps his mind occupied.

Also please rephrase that last part because its very stereotype-y and not cool 

:’(

  • Some well-meaning Tumblr idiot: Umm? You forget that Asians and Asian Americans exist too??? Why are you erasing their voices??
  • Me, an Asian American: Hey. Fucking shut up already if you haven't personally interviewed every Asian American on their opinion.
  • Same well-meaning Tumblr idiot: You wouldn't understand oppression. Fucking stupid whitey.
  • Me, an Asian American with a pic of herself on her own blog: Yeah, okay. Sure thing, buddy.

anonymous asked:

i don't think they're annoying, frankly i just think they're enjoying the attention too much, i guess?

yes babe

i agree

because, y’know, they’re young. this is big for them. of course they’re going to enjoy the attention they’re getting. of course they are. and guess who else enjoys the attention he gets? henrik. and probably ulrikke. herman most definitely does. marlon’s never been opposed to it. in fact, i assure you the rest of the cast enjoys the attention just as much??? the only cast member who has ever explicitly stated their discomfort with attention is tarjei, but otherwise, i’m gonna go out on a limb here and say all of them are really enjoying the attention, lol.

and that’s okay??? they’re allowed to??? people in other countries do it all the time when they get a little bit of fame??? let them enjoy it, let them have their fun. i seriously do not see how this should have any bearing on how you feel about them. for example, i love henrik to pieces, but i’m not turning a blind eye to the fact that he’s enjoying the attention from fans – he invites them to his place of work, even. and that’s okay. that’s always been okay. so what these boys are doing? also okay.

they get to enjoy the attention. sorry if you think them doing so is annoying – not you, specifically, since you said you don’t think they’re annoying, but to the people i’ve seen call them annoying countless of times, like. y’all never complain when the rest of the cast pulls this shit or are so obviously reveling in the attention they’re getting. let them live. let yourself live, like, take a chill pill, go take a nap or something, jeez. why are you so pressed?

these kids are sweet. it’s not like they’ve taken over your instagram feed, demanded you watch their livestream and then proceeded to insult your family and your family’s family or something. they were just having fun, answering questions, having a good time. and no one made you watch the livestream. so, like. breathe, maybe. let them live their life the way they want it, so long as it’s not directly affecting you~

Reasons Camren Bicondova is a great Selina Kyle

- half Latina
- great actress, girl blows me away some times
- looks like Michelle pfeiffer who is a greatly praised adaptation of Selina Kyle - is half Spanish
- moves like a cat wtf how cool is that
- like legit her family is Spanish on her dad’s side she has confirmed this
- a total badass
- half Latina
- u know who else is half Latina
- Selina Kyle
- please stop erasing this it’s legit in the comics
- and if your against this please explain why you don’t want a character to be of a certain race
- now listen to yourself and tell me you don’t sound racist
- don’t erase latinx characters’ backgrounds
- she’s pretty

People who equate Wakanda not allowing its country to be ravaged by Imperialism like the rest of Africa to capitalists “hoarding resources” are being racist and also sound ignorant. First, capitalists exploit resources for profit, they don’t share them equitably so that the whole society can succeed.  They don’t protect land and resources, they exploit them for the benefit of a small group of people. Second, Wakanda participates in world politics and had sent aid workers to Lagos. T’Chaka was assassinated while he was participating in such a process. Third, none of your white favs or their countries of origin represent any of these values you are talking about, so why are you so upset when Wakanda comes on the scene?

Sylvana Simons, the first ever black female party leader of a European political party.

“Racism, sexism and Islamophobia are widespread, not just in the Netherlands but in most parts of Western Europe. I was tolerated when I was an entertainer. But you can’t be black, female, politically involved and try to shape the society you live in without angering some people.

When I started speaking out one of the first comments was that I didn’t “know my place”. I’ve known my place my whole life! If you are not white, heterosexual and male, this country suggests you have to be treated differently.

When you’ve gained wealth through slavery and colonialism, you will build courts, police and judiciary based on that system. The problem is when you say such things out loud it sounds as if everyone is being racist on purpose all the time. That’s not true, but the way the society is shaped is racist and divisive.

We want to represent all of Dutch society and our list of candidates alone shows we are truly reflecting the Netherlands. We have equal numbers of men and women. We have gay, lesbian, and transgender candidates. We are normalising what is already normal in society.

We are a new and unconventional voice in society. We are emancipating people and politics.”

When you understand that calling people “idiot racists” is not a good plan for the left wing. But also realize many of these people are, in fact, “idiot racists.”

Originally posted by lilsparrow72

I’ll never forget that clip from TDS when Klepper attended that Trump rally:

“Um, a lot of the stuff you’re saying sounds, eh, sorta racist.”

“Bro, you’re at a Trump rally.”

A rather horrific exchange, if you think about it.