not to mention the lyrics

The only lyric T*ylor Sw*ft had her ghost writer write that is even remotely worth mentioning is the lyric “boys only want love if it’s torture” because that’s the truest thing I’ve ever heard tbh

A Name In The Wind (6/?)

Hey guys, thanks for all of the comments, reblogs and messages about this fic. I’m super glad you like it! Anyway, here’s the next chapter, I hope you enjoy!

Nozomi was reading over the report she’d been putting off for a few weeks when she heard Eli let out an indignant growl. She looked up in time to see her best friend throw her pen. It bounced off the table, landing out of sight.

“You okay over there, Elichi?” She asked in amusement, raising an eyebrow. She couldn’t imagine Eli was frustrated because of homework. She was probably finished already. She had mentioned that she would work on lyrics when she came over to Nozomi’s apartment.

“I can’t think of any good lyrics.” Eli huffed, folding her arms on the table. She slouched down, resting her chin upon them. “Also what’s been going on with you, Honoka and Maki?! She usually comes to me when she has a problem. When did you become her favourite?!”

Nozomi chuckled under her breath. “Someone sounds jealous…”

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Columbine Songs
Eminem
Columbine Songs

Eminem and Columbine


I am an Eminem Fan for years now and when I started to get more and more into True Crime I was surprised to find a lot of his Lyrics mentioning Columbine which I never really realised before. Of course he also mentioned other murderers or events, like Ted Bundy and the Aurora theater shooting but I wanted to start with the Columbine lyrics because there’s a lot of material. So let’s start:


The Way I Am, 2000
0:00-0:16
When a dude’s getting bullied and shoots up his school
And they blame it on Marilyn and the heroin
Where were the parents at? And look where it’s at!
Middle America, now it’s a tragedy
Now it’s so sad to see, an upper-class city
Havin’ this happening

Marshall states that he thinks that he thinks that not music is the reason for the shooting but bullying and the parents. But as we all know Marilyn Manson was partly blamed for Columbine by the media.
Em is also making fun of the fact that Columbine was the first shooting that people cared this much about although there have been a lot of shootings but now it happened at a “nice” school.

There is an alternative version of this song featuring Marilyn Manson (x)
He performed it live with Manson (x and x)
Manson also appeared in the official video (x)

Remember me, 2000
0:17-0:30
Came home and somebody musta broke in the back window
And stole two loaded machine guns and both of my trenchcoats
Sick, sick dreams of picnic scenes
Two kids, sixteen, with M-16’s and ten clips each
And them shits reach through six kids each

Em is making fun of the idea that musicians like him are a bad influence because he is not the one who gives these kids their weapons.

And as we all know, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold both wore a Trenchcoat when the attack started, that’s why „both of my Trenchcoats“ were stolen. And so he thinks that they were stolen to start another Columbine.
And when you have these „two kids“ with guns that, when you shoot them, „reach through six kids each“ you have 12 dead kids. And as we all know, during the Columbine massacre died 12 kids (and one adult).

By the way, Eminem needed two months to write his whole verse on this song while Sticky Fingaz wrote his verse in one day. 


I’m Back, 2000
0:30-0:41
I take seven [kids] from [Columbine]
Stand ‘em all in line, add an AK-47, a revolver, a 9
A MAC-11 and it oughta solve the problem of mine
And that’s a whole school of bullies shot up all at one time

This is probably the most well known Columbine reference made by Eminem.
This album came out one year after the massacre so it was still an sensitive subject. Therefore his label censored these two words (Kids and Columbine), even on the explicit version of the album.
I don’t think I have to explain what exactly this lyric means, it’s pretty clear.
In his book he states this:


“ I was getting shit about the Columbine reference on “I’m Back” and the label was telling me that I wasn’t gonna be able to say it. My whole thing was, what is the big fucking deal? That shit happens all the time. Why is that topic so touchy as opposed to, say a four-year-old kid drowning? Why isn’t that considered a huge tragedy? People die in the city all the time. People get shot, people get stabbed, raped, mugged, killed and all kinds of shit. What the fuck is the big deal with Columbine that makes it separate from any other tragedy in America?”

In 2015 a 15 year-old boy was arrested. He posted these lyrics on Instagram and added “Cause I’m just like shady and just as crazy as the world was over that whole Y2K thing”
The origiginal lyrics are “ ‘Cause (I'mmmm) Shady, they call me as crazy
As the world was over this whole Y2K thing”

When authorities searched the boy’s home they found weaponry and eventually arrested him. He denied any knowledge of the weapons and said he didn’t post this text on Instagram.


White America, 2002
0:42-0:48
White America, I could be one of your kids
White America, little Eric looks just like this

In this song it’s not only about the Lyrics but also about the music video.
With “little Eric” he mentioned Eric Harris but it was also meant as an example for a typical white kid. He is from middle america because his name is in the middle of amERICa.
The interesting part is, as I said, the video. Where you can see news of an school shooting during “I could be one of your kids”
And during “little Eric looks just like this” you can see one of those typical yearbook pictures and the house of the school shooter. The house looks a bit like the one the Harrises had.

When these lines get repeated you can see a boy full of (probably) blood stepping out of the map of america. On his shirt is written “I am Eric”.


Rap God, 2013
0:49-0:54
I’ll take seven kids from Columbine
Put ‘em all in a line, add an AK-47, a revolver and a 9

This was the first time we could hear the Columbine Line uncensored. Eminem didn’t rap all of the “I’m back” lines because he just wanted to
“See if I get away with it now that I ain’t as big as I was”
As you can hear, he got away with it.





Eminem is one of the few people who openly give their sympathy for the two shooters.
He admitted to be interested in serial killers in this statement:
“I did find myself watching a lot of documentaries on serial killers, I mean, I always had a thing for them. I’ve always been intrigued by them and I found that watching movies about killers sparked something in me.The way a serial killer’s mind works, just the psychology of them is pretty fucking crazy. I was definitely inspired by that, but most of the album’s imagery came from my own mind.”

But Marshall Mathers seems to have an very personal realationship with the whole Columbine Issue.
He himself was bullied on a daily basis during his childhood, often for his race and for always being the new kid. When he was nine years old he got beaten up so bad he was in an coma for several days. I think he is one of the people who is trying to understand what Harris and Klebold were going through.
But I think it is important to mention, that he is the living proof that even when your life is is shitty right now because of some people who have nothing in their life but to terrorize you, that you can still have a better life. And you beat them best when you keep on living.

“That Columbine shit is so fucking touchy. As much sympathy as we give the Columbine shootings, nobody ever looked at it from the fuckin’ point of view of the kids who were bullied—I mean, they took their own fucking life! And it was because they were pushed so far to the fucking edge that they were fucking so mad. I’ve been that mad.

-Marshall Mathers

C. Delores Tucker and The Fight Against Misogynoiristic (C)Rap Music


When the late C. Delores Tucker went against violent misogynoir in rap music, she did not go on about “da white man this, da white man that” rants she held these anti-woman misogynoiristic rappers accountable for their own behavior and actions. We’ve all heard the excuses from Blackistan that it was “da white record execs who made these po’ negro males degrade and demean their own women”, however Mrs. Tucker (like many of us now) wasn’t buying it. When she called out these BW-hating muthaphuckas they called responded with more violent misogynoir (2pac and lil’ kim included, so disappointed in Kim) they called her every thing but a child of God. [Side Note: From what I heard the ONLY person who stood with her was a black man named, Rev. Calvin Butts (and I believe there were a few others) while the rest of Blackistan sat back as usual quiet while she was attacked.] Here some information about the misogynoiristic attackes she faced from her Wikipedia bio:

Tucker dedicated much of the last few years of her life to condemning sexually explicit lyrics in rap and hip-hop tracks, citing a concern that the lyrics were misogynistic and threatened the moral foundation of the African American community.[6][7]

Called “narrow-minded” by some rappers who often mentioned her in their lyrics, Tucker picketed stores that sold rap music and bought stock in Sony, Time Warner, and other companies in order to protest hip-hop at their shareholders’ meetings.[6] She also fought against the NAACP’s decision to nominate late rapper Tupac Shakur for one of its Image Awards[6] and filed a $10 million lawsuit against his estate for comments that the rapper made in his song “How Do U Want It?” on the album All Eyez on Me, in which Shakur rapped “C. Delores Tucker you’s a motherfucker / Instead of trying to help a nigga you destroy a brother”. In her lawsuit, Tucker claimed that comments in this song, and on the track “Wonda Why They Call U Bitch” from the same album, inflicted emotional distress, were slanderous and invaded her privacy.[8] This case was eventually dismissed.[9]

Other rappers have taken similar stances. In his song “Church for Thugs”, The Game raps “I’ve got more hatred in my soul than Pac had for De'ores Tucker.” Jay-Z chimes in as well, with the lines “I don’t care if you’re C. Dolores Tucker or you’re Bill O'Reilly, you only riling me up,” from The Black Album’s “Threat.” Lil’ Kim also referenced her in a leftover track, entitled “Rockin’ It”, from her second studio album. Kim raps “C. Delores T., Screw her, I never knew her”, after Tucker dubbed her music as “gangsta porno rap” and “filth”.[10][11] Much of KRS-One and Channel Live’s “Free Mumia” is a direct criticism of what the MCs see as Tucker’s misplaced energy. Lil Wayne also referenced her in his leftover song “Million Dollar Baby” rapping “Can’t be banned I’m sorry Miss Delores.” Rapper Eminem also mentioned Tucker in the D-12 song “Rap Game”, in which he rapped the line “Tell that C. Delores Tucker slut to suck a dick.”

Mrs. Tucker knew that this misogynoiristic crap called hip shit hop would lead the black “community” further down in looking-ass niggerdom. BTW, Black Women funded and supported (and still do) this particular oppression.

[Side Note: And if you all can stomach it, go look at the comments below under  these videos (below) here and here Blackistan is still defending this music and cursing her and the woman is dead, how low. The Black Men in the comments are still making excuses and and found a way to blame it ALL ON black women.] 

Now years later, you got some niggas talkin about “Mrs Tucker was right.”

It’s like @for-marginalized-bw-only  once said that black people act like grown rank negro males have NO control over their own behavior and actions, its always “da white man made me do it” mantra everytime there is disrespect or defamation to the Black Woman’s body, character or image.


THERE HAS GOT TO BE SOME ACCOUNTABILITY ON THESE NEGRO MALES PART, AND BLACK WOMEN LIKE ME WILL KEEP DOING JUST THAT, FIRST BY BOYCOTTING THE VAST MAJORITY OF RAPPERS, MALE (AND FEMALE).


R.I.P. Mrs. Dr. C. Delores Tucker, We Will Make Sure That Your Fight Will Not Be In Vain

The Struggle Is Intersectional


Something Just Like This

Summary: AU. This is the story of an ordinary couple with an extraordinary love.

Pairing: Bucky Barnes x reader

Word Count: 2,652 (without lyrics)

Warnings: language, fluff, sarcasm, pregnancy, mentions of bullying, illness, and death, song fic style

A/N: This is my oneshot submission for the poetic noble land mermaid @whothehellisbella and her Bella’s Cool Time Summer Jamz Mix Writing Challenge. My song prompt was Something Just Like This - The Chainsmokers, Coldplay. I hope you approve and enjoy!

Originally posted by duckybarness

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Faithfully (Bucky Rockstar AU)

Characters: reader, Bucky, OC Ava Barnes, Steve, Clint, Tony, Wanda.

Summary: Being on the road with your rockstar husband had it’s challenges. What if you found out he was unfaithful? (Avengers AU)

Warnings: babies, pregnancy, possible cheating, tiny bit of language, sex mentions, drinking, nudity, bit of angst, mostly fluff. 

Word Count: 3k (including lyrics)

Song Inspiration: Faithfully by Journey

Tags are at the bottom

A/N: Oof. This idea struck me like lightning. I’ve been working on another fic but felt a little stuck. This one flowed out of me in the space of a few hours. I freaking love Journey and this story! I’ve sacrificed quite a bit of sleep to finish, so I hope it was worth it!! Please let me know your thoughts! Love you guys!! :)

Masterlist

_______________________________________________________

Originally posted by veronikaphoenix

Brushing your fingertip over perfect round cheeks while marveling at gorgeous long lashes and her tiny pout, you fell in love all over again. This little person had your heart. Well. A good portion of it. Speaking of your heart…

You heard rustling in the next “room” followed by the partition sliding aside. Bucky stumbled out of the bedroom, rubbing a hand over his face. His chin-length hair stuck out in ten different directions and he was clad in only a pair of boxers.

“Morning, handsome,” you greeted him with an amused smile.

He let out a groan, “What time is it?”

“Almost noon.”

“And…where are we?”

You chuckled, “Somewhere in the midwest, I think. St. Louis, maybe?”

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rollingstone.com
Harry Styles' Revealing New Album Doc: 10 Things We Learned
Read 10 things we learned from Harry Styles' new Apple Music album doc, from why he cut his hair to what it felt like to regain his private life.

Following the release of his self-titled debut, Harry Styles has given fans an inside look at the process of making the record in a new Apple Music documentary titled Harry Styles: Behind the Album. The 50-minute feature shows Styles playing the complete album for the first time in between recording sessions with his band and producer Jeff Bhasker in Jamaica and London. While the 23-year-old has been extremely candid about his life in the year following One Direction’s hiatus, he opens up even further here as he details the process of writing and recording Harry Styles. Here are 10 things we learned from the film.

1. Styles first performed the album all the way through at the legendary Abbey Road Studios.
The live scenes from the film show Styles fronting his new band at rock’s holiest ground: Abbey Road Studios. Not only was it a convenient location since he lives close by, but the site also held a special significance for the lifelong Beatles fan. Styles notes the “aura about the place” that drew him in.

2. He relished the opportunity to live a totally private life for a full year.
For five years, One Direction was the biggest band in the world. They sold out stadiums on their back-to-back tours while fans and tabloids followed their every move. Having spent his teenage years in the harsh spotlight, Styles was able to slip away from the immense fame he experienced – living quietly at home with his family – and retreat to Jamaica to make music. As he put it, he “made myself get bored.”

3. Don’t get it twisted, though: He loved being in One Direction.
“When you leave a band, a boy band, you feel like you have to go the complete other direction and say, ‘Don’t worry everyone, I hated it. It wasn’t me,’” Styles explains before noting that his experience in and out of the group was filled with nothing but real, genuine love and appreciation. “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for that band.” As positive as the experience was, the young artists felt a lot of pressure to get bigger with each album and tour, and Styles is glad the group’s first phase ended on a high note. Having that experience has allowed him to feel like he can pursue a less intense, maybe even smaller career than what he did with One Direction.

4. Cutting off his long hair helped him to make a fresh start.
For the latter half of his time in 1D, Styles became “the one with the long hair,” as he views it. During their Made in the A.M. era, his long tresses fell below his shoulder and became an important part of his look. In the documentary, cutting off his hair is a symbolic, momentous occasion that helps him enter a new era of his life and career. Still, he tries to not dwell on that too much during the interview scenes. “I was about to personify my hair, but then I decided not to,” he jokes.

5. He gave collaborator Mitch Rowland a handmade guitar.
One of Styles’ main collaborators on the LP is Mitch Rowland, who joined the band by chance. Rowland had been working at a pizza shop before teaming up with Styles, Bhasker and the rest of their crew, and he ended up co-writing every song with Styles. In a tender scene from the documentary, the singer shows his appreciation for the musician by giving him a gorgeous handmade guitar. As his own thank you, Rowland offers Styles the guitar he had been playing throughout the process of creating the album after playing his own “farewell solo” on it.

6. Jeff Bhasker helped Styles grow as a songwriter.
Styles has nothing but compliments for the superstar producer whom he credits with helping him grow as a songwriter. For Styles, Bhasker’s encouragement and support was an integral part of the writing process for his solo debut. According to him, he had written several duds early on, and instead of dismissing the tracks entirely, Bhasker found “the good bits” and they continued on with those.

7. “Carolina” was the last song written for the album.
Bhasker was looking for a rocker with a good melody to round out the album, so Styles served up the riveting, early-Sixties-ish “Carolina” to fulfill the producer’s order. “It was the little bit of fun we had been wanting but didn’t have,” Styles says of the song. It is also the only song in the documentary that Styles confirms to be about a specific person whose name is in the lyrics. Sleuthing fans have connected the song to a fan named Townes whom he had met once when she was 17 years old. According to Styles, he has seen her once since writing the tune though he did not reveal to her that he had written a song about their one-time encounter.

8. He remains diplomatic when it comes to writing songs about other people – and having songs written about him.
“To have been part of a moment that means something to someone enough for them to write a song about it is a huge compliment,” Styles reveals. He is careful not to name names but he is confident that the people he sings about on his debut solo album will be able to connect specific moments mentioned in the lyrics with their personal experiences. Asked about the times when the tables have been turned on him, Styles offers a coy “no comment.”

9. Seeing a gospel choir record backing vocals for “Sign of the Times” made him emotional.
One specific moment during the recording process that left a major impression on Styles was the experience of sitting in the room as a gospel choir recorded massive, angelic harmonies for his first solo single “Sign of the Times.” In footage of Styles experiencing this moment, he clutches his face and even runs up to hug the soloist towards the end of the session.

10. He had to have a prosthetic version of his face made while filming his first music video.
After photos from the set of the “Sign of the Times” video leaked on Twitter, fans shared spooky images of a man wearing a prosthetic version of Styles’ face while flying in the sky. The Michael Myers–esque mask was created in case Styles needed a stuntman for the video, which features him flying through mountains and over the sea while singing the song.

The talented group never quite blew up in Korea like they deserved to, and their growing momentum was abruptly killed when contract issues with their agency, TS Entertainment, put them on hiatus for almost a year. BTS have since hit the big leagues with a similar sound and style to B.A.P, from covering social issues in their music to being fronted by a gravelly voiced rapper.  It’s turned B.A.P into more of a mid-tier niche act, rather than the BTS-sized stars they deserve to be. It’s a shame, because Rose is one of the best releases of the group’s career. Title track “Wake Me Up” is one of the few B.A.P singles to meld the angst and aggression of their political or socially-charged tracks with an easily digestible dance beat and addictive chorus. With this group, it’s usually one or the other. “Wake Me Up” also has a more personal touch, with lyrics about leader Bang Yong Guk’s battle with depression and anxiety that should touch fans”

I cannot get over this article 

  • Not comparing B.A.P to BTS but putting them on the same level musically
  • praising Rose correctly (none of this “it’s different than what most groups are dropping these days which is okay but not great” type bullshit)
  • Mentions how deep the lyrics actually fucking are 
  • “Wake Me Up” also has a more personal touch, with lyrics about leader Bang Yong Guk’s battle with depression and anxiety that should touch fans

like give this man a fucking award please