not science news

You’re looking at a real big deal.

Because in a nanotechnology lab, big deals come in smaller and smaller packages. What you see above is an extreme close-up of a 5 nanometer transistor. In an industry-first, the IBM Research Alliance developed nanosheet transistors that will enable a 5 nm chip. What’s so big about that? Well, by achieving a scale of 30 billion switches on a fingernail sized chip, it can deliver significant enhancements over today’s state-of-the-art 10 nm chips. This not only improves the performance of current technologies but also provides the fuel for the future demands of AI, VR, quantum and mobile technologies to run on. Plus, it could also make things like smartphone batteries last 2-3x longer between charges, so it may also be a real lifesaver too. 


Learn more about it->

People around the world use more than a trillion plastic bags every year. They’re made of a notoriously resilient kind of plastic called polyethylene that can take decades to break down.

But the humble wax worm may hold the key to biodegrading them.

It was an accidental discovery. Scientist and beekeeper Federica Bertocchini was frustrated to find that her beehives were infested with the caterpillar larvae of Galleria mellonella, commonly known as a wax worm.

Bertocchini, who works at the Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology of Cantabria in Spain, tells NPR that she was cleaning out the hive and put the worm-infested parts in a plastic bag.

But shortly afterward, she noticed that “they were all crawling around my place and the plastic bag was riddled with holes.”

The Lowly Wax Worm May Hold The Key To Biodegrading Plastic

Photo: Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

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Captain’s Log | September 15, 2017

The end is now upon us. Within hours of the posting of this entry, Cassini will have burned up in the atmosphere of Saturn … a kiloton explosion, spread out against the sky in a pyrrhic display of light and fire, a dazzling flash to signal the dying essence of a lone emissary from another world. As if the myths of old had foretold the future, the great patriarch will consume his child. At that point, that golden machine, so dutiful and strong, will enter the realm of history, and the toils and triumphs of this long march will be done.

For those of us appointed long ago to undertake this journey, it has been a taxing 3 decades, requiring a level of dedication that I could not have predicted, and breathless times when we sprinted for the duration of a marathon. But in return, we were blessed to spend our lives working and playing in that promised land beyond the Sun.

My imaging team members and I were especially blessed to serve as the documentarians of this historic epoch and return a stirring visual record of our travels around Saturn and the glories that we found there. This is our gift to the citizens of planet Earth.

So, it is with both wistful, sentimental reflection and a boundless sense of pride in a commitment met and a job well done that I now turn to face this looming, abrupt finality.

It is doubtful we will soon see a mission as richly suited as Cassini return to this ringed world and shoulder a task as colossal as we have borne over the last 27 years.

To have served on this mission has been to live the rewarding life of an explorer of our time, a surveyor of distant worlds. We wrote our names across the sky. We could not have asked for more.

I sign off now, grateful in knowing that Cassini’s legacy, and ours, will include our mutual roles as authors of a tale that humanity will tell for a very long time to come.

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Attendees from across the country descended on the nation’s capital to speak up for science.

The March for Science unfolded on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, and in multiple cities around the world. Coinciding with Earth Day, the event drew researchers, educators and scientifically-minded people.

The event kicked off with open teaching sessions on the Mall, followed by a rally near the Washington Monument, and then a march that traveled to the U.S. Capitol building.

NPR spoke to some of the participants about why they decided to attend the March for Science.

PHOTOS: Scientists Take To Washington To Stress A Nonpartisan Agenda

Photos: Meredith Rizzo/NPR

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In some cultures, it’s traditional for elders to smoke weed, a practice said to help them pass on knowledge. A study done by Andreas Zimmer at the university of Bonn, Germany seems to add truth to this tradtion. The investigators are studying the endocannabinoid system, which helps balance out our bodies’ response to stress. Mice whose endocannabinoid system don’t work properly age faster, leading Zimmer to investigate if stimulating the system may have the opposite effect. Zimmer’s team is now planning trials to see if these observations can be replicated in humans.

It’s so beautiful. It’s so beautiful it makes me want to cry. It’s the fulfillment of dozens, hundreds, thousands of people’s efforts, but it’s also the fulfillment of an idea suddenly becoming real.
— 

Peter Saulson of Syracuse University, who has spent more than three decades working on the detection of gravitational waves.

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

npr.org
Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene
In experimental embryos, scientists were able to repair the gene that causes a serious heart disorder. But more research is needed to confirm the method would produce healthy babies, they say.

An international team of scientists reports they have successfully figured out a way to edit DNA in human embryos — without introducing the harmful mutations that were a problem in previous attempts elsewhere. The work was published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.

happy weekend 🌥
★彡
here’s some communication study!!
p.s i’d like to say thank you for the support and love this account has recently gotten!! i literally went from 22 followers to about 380+ in about 3-4 months even though i hadn’t posted much, and that’s crazy to think about!!

edit: um actually about 430+ i didn’t even realise HAHAHA silly me BUT THANK YOU 🌸 edit #2: WHAT THE HECK WHEN DID THIS GET SO MANY NOTES LORD i should maybe pay more attention to my studyblr.. but thank you all!! you sweet souls.

The day of the long-awaited coast-to-coast solar eclipse has all but arrived — and if history is any guide, it’s likely that somebody’s eyes are going to get hurt.

“The ones we’re really concerned about are the people who have never seen an eclipse before — or just decided that, you know, ‘Today is a nice day to go take a look at a solar eclipse’ — and, 'Oh, I probably don’t need to do very much to get ready to do that.’ Then I get worried,” says Ralph Chou, an optometrist and vision scientist at the University of Waterloo in Canada. He has seen 18 total solar eclipses.

You really can get blurred vision or blind spots after watching partial eclipses without protection, says Chou, even if there is just a tiny little crescent of sun left in the sky.

Be Smart: A Partial Eclipse Can Fry Your Naked Eyes

Photos: Tim Graham/Getty Images and Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images 

huffingtonpost.com
Ivanka Trump Is Not To Blame For Her Dad's Terrible Policies
Sure, she's bad at her job. But that's not the same as complicity.

YES. SHE. FUCKING. ISSSS

“she’s incompetent but not complicit” get the entire fuck out of here White Feminist™ Devils.

Ivanka benefits from, and propagates everything her family does. One of the most insidious things about the Trump admin is that everything is done in house and they border nepotism by literally merging the presidency with the FAMILY BUSINESS.

I’m tired of everyone breaking their back to make laundry lists of excuses for the privileged rich women in the Trump family. Why are you dying to absolve them from the responsibility they hold with the role they play in ruining America.

It’s really upsetting that Ivanka & Melania will be remembered as innocent victims of this disgrace of a presidency. They will remain “major political influencers” and symbols of feminine power and will go down as feminist icons.

This is exactly the fucking problem with how Trump came into power in the first place

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Japanese scientists have genetically engineered a chrysanthemum flower that is “true blue” — a color that has long eluded flower breeders and researchers.

Blue has proved a challenge to produce in many other popular flowers, including roses, carnations and lilies.

It hasn’t happened until now in chrysanthemums due to the “recalcitrant and unpredictable expression of introduced genes,” Naonobu Noda from Japan’s National Agriculture and Food Research Organization tells The Two-Way. Noda is the lead author of the paper released today in Science Advances.

When scientists tried previously to introduce genes to create a blue color, Noda said, the flower would “shut them off by as yet unknown mechanisms.” Other attempts produced violet flowers, not blue ones.

PHOTOS: Japanese Scientists Turn Chrysanthemums ‘True Blue’

Photo: Naonobu Noda and Satoshi Yoshioka/NARO

This is the new album cover from Brand New and the album is entitled Science Fiction.

The cover is art is by Swedish photographer Thobias Faldt.

Still can’t find a good quality rip (this was written before the official release and the band were sending out the cryptic CDs). Honestly, don’t listen to the crappy Facebook live streams going around. If you’ve waited 8 years then your ears deserve better than that.

So damn excited


Update - Album is now fully up on the Procrastinate website, go buy it. If you’ve already preordered the vinyl you will get a free download.

Scientists are about to get an up-close and personal look at Jupiter’s most famous landmark, the Great Red Spot.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft will be directly over the spot shortly after 10 p.m. ET on Monday, July 10, about 5,600 miles above the gas giant’s cloud tops. That’s closer than any spacecraft has been before.

The spot is actually a giant storm that has been blowing on Jupiter for centuries. It’s huge, larger than the Earth in diameter.

“It’s lasted a really long time,” says Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio and principal scientist for NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter. “No scientists really understand exactly how that storm is created or why it could last so long.”

NASA Spacecraft Gets Up Close With Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

Image: Karen Teramura with James O'Donoghue and Luke Moore/NASA