not always obvious

3

Mekke øl + mutually failing at talking to their crush because they’re nervous

6

A subtle reminder that Rob is the father in real life [for added effect]

ASL is a language

American Sign Language and other signed languages are languages. It’s important to respect them as languages.

ASL is not English. It is a completely different language. Similarly, signed languages aren’t all the same. British Sign Language is completely different from ASL.

Signs are not universal, any more than spoken words are universal. The meaning of a sign isn’t always obvious just by watching; many signs are completely arbitrary.

Sign is not pantomime, and it’s not ad hoc gesture. It’s also not like symbolic gestures that are sometimes made up to accompany kids songs either. It’s a language, with all the complexities of language. The difference is important, and it needs to be respected. 

In order to know what signs mean, you have to learn them. (Just like in order to know what spoken words mean, you have to learn them.)

ASL is not just gestures, any more than spoken languages are just sounds. ASL has grammar, vocabulary, and culture. It’s important to respect this and not erase it.  

anonymous asked:

Can I just say how afraid I am of s3? Because we know that shiro are going to be separated so it's going to be the rest of the team bonding and that means Keith and Lance and that means kl@nce stans and antis will explode. the fallout will be huge and s4 will be a long time away to mitigate the damage.

Well, I try to keep things nice and calm here for everyone. I realize navigating certain parts of the fandom can be difficult, and for that I’m sorry. As for Shiro and Keith’s relationship though, I really don’t think you need to worry. 

I honestly don’t believe that anyone can ever take Shiro’s place, you know? Especially in Keith’s mind. I understand the general theme in fandom is for people to replace Shiro with their fav and have them comfort/grow closer to Keith in Shiro’s absence but like?? there’s no evidence of that really. And even though Keith will be opening up more and bonding with the rest of his team (which is honestly a good thing), it doesn’t mean anyone is gonna suddenly replace Shiro. 

Because it was Shiro that Keith was so affected by when he saw him after a year, his fond memories of Shiro and all the painful ones after Kerberos that made him look at Shiro with such tenderness and say his name so softly. It was Shiro who he welcomed back and into his home, and Shiro who in turn looked at Keith and said “It’s good to be back.”

It was Shiro who Keith was always willing to risk everything to protect

It was Shiro who always grounded Keith and gave him advice. As Joaquim says, “[Keith] latches onto Shiro at times because Shiro’s sort of the only thing that can really calm him down and keep him in check”–the kind of anchor you can’t just replace

It was Shiro who literally changed Keith’s life 

It was Shiro who looked at Keith and saw a leader, saw someone he could entrust with the safety of his team. And Keith in turn reassured Shiro that he still had a place with that team, that it was too soon to be giving up just yet. Keith and Shiro put up a brave face in front of everyone else. But when it’s just them, they allow themselves to be more vulnerable 

It was Shiro that noticed Keith was struggling during season 2 when he came to terms with being galra; it was Shiro who noticed Keith was really hurting and tried to help him (and similarly, you see a lot of Keith checking in with Shiro as well: see Sendak and Ulaz) 

It was Shiro who was the person Keith desperately wants to see, the physical embodiment of his greatest hopes and dreams. Whether platonic or romantic, you can’t tell me that’s not love–because Keith clearly loves Shiro, sees him as his closest person

It was Shiro who was the only paladin there for Keith’s initial galra reveal–he stood there and stared in awe when Keith’s blade transformed, shared that moment with him

And it was Shiro and only Shiro who showed his immediate support and solidarity, accepting Keith and reassuring him wholeheartedly when no one else on the team will even say goodbye  

And despite the fake Shiro saying “We’re your family”–we as in, all the paladins–that’s still not enough to convince Keith to give in during the trial. His duty as a paladin isn’t enough. It’s only the thought of Shiro leaving him–and that, without Shiro, he would be all alone–that drives him to give up everything. His identity, his past, any chance at a future with his family–all sacrificed so he can stay with Shiro. When talking about this scene, Josh said that “[Keith’s] constantly scared he’s going to say or do something wrong and he’s going to lose Shiro.” It’s one of his greatest fears 

The writers don’t put so much care into establishing characters’ relationships just to suddenly toss them to the wayside. And I think that, especially with Keith piloting Black and the existence of the astral plane, it’s very likely we’ll see Shiro and Keith communicating through Black. Sharing memories and a stream of consciousness across time and space, just like how Black was able to project memories of Zarkon for Shiro and the two could both meet in the astral plane. Just because Shiro disappeared doesn’t mean he’s necessarily out of play, which is something I’ve talked about a lot here

I also definitely think we’ll see a lot of Shiro and Keith’s backstory established through flashbacks prekerberos, because it only makes sense to parallel his disappearance then with Keith’s reaction now. And I mean, Shiro’s absence is going to very much be felt–especially by Keith. Just because he’s not there, it doesn’t mean Keith won’t miss him and still feel for him. And Keith planning to find and rescue Shiro will probably be a significant part of the plot. I believe the saying is Absence makes the heart grow fonder

Yes, Keith and Lance are probably gonna bond more and get more character development for their dynamic. But their dynamic will never be Shiro and Keith’s dynamic, you know? They’re two completely different things, and you can’t just interchange one with the other. And that’s how it should be, because every character and all their varying interrelationships are inherently unique. 

There’s nothing wrong with other characters getting more development, or with that development being spaced out differently across each season. But I think it’s important to remember that only Shiro can ever be Shiro, and the relationship he has with Keith isn’t just going to be severed just to cater to different fans’ tastes. All that character development we’ve built up already isn’t just going to vanish with Shiro and be thrown away. 

theguardian.com
Ten things I learned about writing from Stephen King
The novelist James Smythe, who has been analysing the work of Stephen King for the Guardian since 2012, on the lessons he has drawn from the master of horror fiction
By James Smythe

Stephen King is an All-Time Great, arguably one of the most popular novelists the world has ever seen. And there’s a good chance that he’s inspired more people to start writing than any other living writer. So, as the Guardian and King’s UK publisher Hodder launch a short story competition – to be judged by the master himself – here are the ten most important lessons to learn from his work.

1. Write whatever the hell you like

King might be best known – or, rather, best regarded – as a writer of horror novels, but really, his back catalogue is crammed with every genre you can think of. There are thrillers (Misery, Gerald’s Game), literary novels (Bag Of Bones, Different Seasons), crime procedurals (Mr Mercedes), apocalypse narratives (The Stand), fantasy (Eyes Of The Dragon, The Dark Tower series) … He’s even written what I think of as being one of the greatest Young Adult novels of all time: The Long Walk. Perhaps the only genre or audience he hasn’t really touched so far is comedy, but most of his work features moments that show his deft touch with humour. It’s clear that King does what he wants, when he wants, and his constant readers – the term he calls his, well, constant readers – will follow him wherever he goes.

2. The scariest thing isn’t necessarily what’s underneath the bed

Horror is a curious thing. What scares one person won’t necessarily scare another. And while there might be moments in his horror novels that tread towards the more conventional ideas of what some find terrifying, for the most part, the truly scary aspects are those that deal with humanity itself. Ghosts drive people to madness, telekinetic girls destroy whole towns with their powers, clowns … well, clowns are just bloody terrifying full stop. But the true crux of King’s ability to scare is finding the thing that his readers are actually worried about, and bringing that to the fore. If you’re writing horror, don’t just think about what goes bump in the night; think about what that bump might drive people to do afterwards.

3. Don’t be scared of transparency

One of my favourite things about King’s short story collections are the little notes about each tale that he puts into the text. The history of them, the context for the idea, how the writing process actually worked. They’re not only invaluable material for aspiring writers – because exactly how many drafts does it take to reach a decent story? King knows! – but they’re also brilliant nuggets of insight into King himself. Some people might think that it’s better off knowing nothing about authors when they read their work, but for King, his heart is on his sleeve. In his latest collection, The Bazaar of Broken Dreams, King gets more in-depth than ever, talking about what inspired the stories in such an honest way that it couldn’t have come from another writer’s pen. Which brings us to …

4. Write what you know. Sort of. Sometimes

Write what you know is the most common writing tip you’ll find anywhere. It’s nonsense, really, because if we all did that we’d end up with terribly boring novels about writers staring out of windows waiting for inspiration to hit. (If you like those, incidentally, head straight for the literary fiction section of your nearest bookshop.) But King understands that experience is something which can be channelled into your work, and should be at every opportunity. Aspects of his life – addiction, teaching, his near-fatal car accident, rock and roll, ageing – have cropped up in his work over and over, in ways that aren’t always obvious, but often help to drive the story. That’s something every writer can use, because it’s through these truths that real emotions can be writ large on the page.

5. Aim big. Or small

King’s written some mammoth books, and they’re often about mammoth things. The Stand takes readers into an apocalypse, with every stage of it laid out on the page until the final fantastical showdown. It deals with a horror that hits a group of characters twice in their lives, showing us how years and years of experience can change people. And The Dark Tower is a seven (or eight, or more, if you count the short stories set in its world) part series that takes in so many different genres of writing it’s dizzying. When he needs to, King aims really big, and sometimes that’s what you have to do to tell a story. At the other end of the spectrum, some of King’s most enduring stories – Rita Hayworth & Shawshank Redemption, The Mist – have come from his shorter works. He traps small groups of characters in single locations and lets the story play out how it will. The length of the story you’re telling should dictate the size of the book. Doesn’t matter if it’s forty thousand words or two hundred, King doesn’t waste a word.

6. Write all the time. And write a lot

King’s published – wait for it – 55 novels, 11 collections of stories, 5 non-fiction works, 7 novellas and 9 assorted other pieces (including illustrated works and comic books). That’s over a period of 41 years. That’s an average of two books a year. Which is, I must admit, a pretty giddying amount. That’s years of reading (or rereading, if you’re as foolishly in awe of him as I am). But he’s barely stopped for breath. This year has seen three books published by him, which makes me feel a little ashamed. Still, at my current rate of writing, I might catch up with him sometime next century. And while not every book has found the same critical and commercial success, they’ve all got their fans.

7. Voice is just as important as content

King’s a writer who understands that a story needs to begin before it’s actually told. It begins in the voice of the novel: is it first person, or third? Is it past or present tense? Is it told through multiple narrators, or just the one? He’s a master at understanding exactly why each story is told the way it’s told. Sure, he might dress it up as something simple – the story finding the voice it needs, or vice versa – but through his books you can see that he’s tried pretty much everything, and can see why each voice worked with the story he was telling.

8. And Form is just as important as voice

King isn’t really thought of as an experimental novelist, which is grossly unfair. Some of King’s more daring novels have taken on really interesting forms. Be it The Green Mile’s fragmented, serialised narrative; or the dual publication of The Regulators and Desperation – novels which featured the same characters in very different situations, with unsettling parallels between the stories that unfolded for them; or even Carrie’s mixed-media narrative, with sections of the story told as interview or newspaper extract. All of these novels have played with the way they’re presented on the page to find the perfect medium for telling those stories. Really, the lesson here from King is to not be afraid to play.

9. You don’t have to be yourself

Some of King’s greatest works in the early years of his career weren’t published by King himself. They were in the name of Richard Bachman, his slightly grislier pseudonym. The Long Walk, Thinner, The Running Man – these are books that dealt with a nastier side of things than King did in his properly attributed work. Because, maybe it’s good to have a voice that allows us to let the real darkness out, with no judgments. (And then maybe, as King eventually did in The Dark Half, it’s good to kill that voice on the page … )

10. Read On Writing. Now

This is the most important tip in the list. In 2000, King published On Writing, a book that sits in the halfway space between autobiography and writing manual. It’s full of details about his process, about how he wrote his books, channelled his demons and overcame his challenges. It’s one of the few books about writing that are actually worth their salt, mainly because it understands that it’s about a personal experience, and readers might find that useful. There’s no universal truths when it comes to writing. One person’s process would be a nightmare for somebody else. Some people spend years labouring on nearly perfect first drafts; some people get a first draft written in six weeks, and then spend the next year destroying it and rebuilding it. On Writing tells you how King does it, to help you to find your own. Even if you’re not a fan of his books, it’s invaluable to the in-development writer. Heck, it’s invaluable to all writers.

n7warden  asked:

Just had the cutest nap dream where Meg and Buttons learned what dinosaurs were and just walked around Arefu as velociraptors making what they believe were dino sounds and everyone just stared at them like "What in the brahmin shit?". I woke up happy.

pfff you’re right, they’re “that couple” of Arefu :D
I could totally see them getting obsessed about dinosaurs though, maybe after reading some comics or a science book. Imagine their travel to the Dinky!

Voltron S3 giving me a romance vibe

The way the Voltron show is setting up season 3 and all, with Shiro lost (possibly captured by the Galra) and the team trying to find/rescue him with Keith as the leader & the main source of conflict due to Shiro’s absence…. feels more like:

One of those action/romance anime tropes they like to pull.

You know the ones where there’s two characters that have a strong connection (possibly attraction or developing feelings) but then something happens to one of them (they get captured, or get separated etc.) & a whole season or episodes are dedicated to the other character searching for them desperately…

I’m getting that romance/angsty vibe from the clips we’ve been shown
Because the other paladins are hurting too but they are on board with moving on quickly due to Galra threat and it’s only Keith that seems to be taking this the hardest, he’s reluctant to move forward.

He’ll grow from it I’m sure but I’m just getting that vibe that you find in romance/action anime.

Writing is Hard, Part 5: Headcanons

Summary: Dean shows the reader that there’s truth to a famous headcanon.

Read Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4

Warning: Smut

Word Count: 3000ish

A/N: This is all written with love for fan fic. I’m teasing, not putting it down in any way. Hope you enjoy! (Sorry, tag list is closed!) XOXO


“Reading anything good?” Dean asks.

Sam’s inside the gas station, picking up some snacks instead of listening to this conversation, so your face doesn’t feel the need to flush with embarrassment. Dean already knows exactly what you’re reading.

“I guess,” you tell him. No need to feed his ego by telling him how hot the story is.

“What is it?”

Keep reading

Astrid wanted more than anything to visit the Barbaric Archipelago Aquarium… to see the new mermaid exhibit. Little did she know that trip would change her life…



A Mercup (mermaid Hiccup) au I’ve started playing around with :) I’m still working out most of the details for the au, I mainly had this image in my head and it sort of sprung from there. More to come soon?

home after rain

blue orchids short story

pairing: jungkook | reader
genre: too much fluff.. too much cute
word count: 3.986
author’s note: surprise! \o/ I honestly have no idea how or why this happened. yesterday I just… started writing, and here we are, a few thousand words later. also, bear in mind that this is a sequel to blue orchids, so you need to read that one first if you want to understand this short piece. hope you all enjoy!

This story is set six years into the future within Blue Orchids’ universe.


The sun rays are melting on your skin. It has been a while since the skies opened up like this, leaving the sun bare to the living, its warmth a pleasant gift after days of storm and gloom. The sand under your legs and feet is, fortunately, not scorching — not yet, at least. The early morning is still warming up to the pristine sun, and the salty winds of the beach are still a strange mixture of the growing heatwave and the remnants of past iciness.

You cannot remember the last time you visited the beach, but it does not feel foreign or uncomfortable. It feels like you belong, mind at peace and body molding to the sand as your extended legs allow your toes to brush against the gentle waves that break and ebb away, water still too chilly to enjoy at its fullest.

Keep reading