not a backup plan

anonymous asked:

I visited a grad school and the professor told me my research that I was doing wasn't very interesting and I'd have a hard time being competitive (I'm doing computational work and essentially doing the grunt work so people can see the similarities/differences between molecules. One use is so drug researchers can find alternative molecules that are cheaper or safer to use, but there are a bunch others). I dont know, it just really wrecked my confidence I'll ever be accepted somewhere.

It was so bad he didnt even bother talking about the school or the program, just backup plans for if I don’t get accepted so that my resume would be stronger for the next year.

Being competitive is a moving target that really depends on the school and program.  When I was interviewing for grad school I literally had a professor tell me that he didn’t believe my work. He wasn’t even in my field. So, sometimes professors just don’t like a certain type of work/understand what goes into certain types of research. Luckily, grad programs have selection committees and not just one random dude.

I think you can probably spin your work in your applications in a way that makes it seem more like an independent project that what you’ve described here. You can sell it as like “developing computational tools for high throughput drug screening” or something sexy sounding like that. Half of the applications are just how well you sell yourself. Talk up things like working independently and learning complex computational programs and stuff like that.

And also, everyone needs computational people who know how to code. It sounds like you have a valuable skill set and it’s probably likely that it will appeal to someone.

But also, you might not get in anywhere this time around and that’s okay. Spending a year or two getting more, varied experiences isn’t a bad thing. Lots of people don’t get in right away, because PhD programs are competitive and selection committees are fickle. Try to remember that it’s not an indictment of you personally or even of your work. Rejection sucks, but it won’t make your work any less valuable and it won’t make you, as a person, any less valuable. 

anonymous asked:

Ngl I would live for a fic where the first ending happened, then Youngjae somehow went back in time or something like that. And he tries everything he can to prevent it all from happening, but he can't seem to make any big differences, so he tries to get Bang to stop caring about him instead but that doesn't work either because its Bang so he finally makes a backup plan to make sure they don't die and hopes he won't have to use it, but he gets kidnapped and that's how the 2nd ending happens

“ he tries to get Bang to stop caring about him instead but that doesn’t work either because its Bang “

FUCKING HELL WHY

i love Legally Blonde so much. all of the women are so supportive of each other im??

  • when Elle was supposed to get engaged, none of the girls were jealous, they were genuinely happy for her n helped her get ready for the big dinner
  • when her bf broke up with her they were supportive
  • when Elle says she wants to go to harvard the counselor lady is like but ur major is fashion, do u have any backup plan? n elle is like nope im going to harvard n the lady is like okay then here’s what u gotta do.
  • her friends didnt get why she wanted to go to law school but supported her anyway, and helped her study
  • when she got 179 on her exam (more than her goal), they treated her like a queen

and that’s only in the first 18 minutes of the movie

I absolutely LOVE people who pay with pennies!

Seriously. 4 years ago, I’m cashiering at a whacky mart on a register that holds all the smokes and alcohol. It’s 10pm and these two young men (early 20s) come up to the counter. They have three random novelty items (I don’t remember they were), but it was strange and unusual to get odd items this late at night. Maybe it was for some fraternity, I don’t know. It’s a college town so I get weird stuff from frats a lot. I scan the items and tell them their total is $22.xx.

Grinning at each other, they reach into their jackets and slam down two gallon zip-lock bags, full of only pennies. I stare them in the eye, but they didn’t even look back at me. Everyone else in line groan and went to other registers. These two kids knew what they were doing, but they didn’t know what they were in for because I prepared for this; I knew this was going to inevitably happen. I grinned with them, because I was gonna get paid during this. These pranksters are here for recreation. This convo occurs between Me, Ringleader (the other guy was silent and awkward), and a friendly coworker of mine.

Me: Is this $22.xx?

Ringleader: …

Me: Did you count it?

Ringleader: Nope.

Me: Are you going to?

Ringleader: Nope.

Me: Is it at least $22.xx?

Ringleader: Don’t know.

Me: Nice.

Coworker: Hey! You guys can use the self checkout. It can take all of your coins at once.

Me: Oh, don’t worry about it Cowor–

Ringleader: Nope, don’t trust them lady.  (Partner laughs)

Coworker: What? Why!?

Ringleader: Doesn’t count all your change right.

Coworker: I’ve used them before. It really works!

Me: (to Coworker) I got this.

I unpacked the ziplocks and threw all the pennies on the counter. It was a beautiful, massive shitstorm of a mess. And I digged in it. I was Frank in a dumpster in ‘It’s Always Sunny’. The two, still averting my gaze, start chuckling as if they were taking away my dignity. They whisper to each other “Dude oh my God,” “Dude yeah,” “Dude, hilarious.” I counted each penny, one by one. My coworker comes up to me.

Coworker: Guess I’ll help you count this.

Me: Don’t worry about it.

(She looks at me confused. Then she puts on her 'get down to busy’ look.)

Coworker: I got your back.

Me: Oh…ok.

We worked up a system where we counted ten, put them in a pile, then with ten stacks of ten pennies we separated them, making $1 piles. We made progress slowly but surely. Some customers came to the line, but we advised them to get to another line. Some of them looked at us confused, but when they saw the counter full of pennies they understood. Some decided to wait, but when they realized it wasn’t going to take just a few minutes they took their leave. Another register in the liquor department opened so it wasn’t too bad for other customers. We get to about $12 (about 10min in) until I “knocked” over the piles.

Coworker: Neontonsil!

Me: Oops. Sorry.

(Coworker looks at my grin. I give her a wink and tilt my head, motioning her to leave)

Coworker: You know what, I think I better let you do this.

Me: Ha, alright.

(Coworker leaves. I look at the two guys. They are absolutely stunned at the fallen piles of pennies.)

Me: (To Ringleader) Yeah, I’m going to have to count all of this again.

Ringleader: ….Ok.

I started from zero. I count slower then ever, and made my way back up. The duo is entirely silent. I get to about $7, when suddenly I say:

Me: Drats. I lost count. I better start all over again.

Ringleader: Really?

Me: Oh yeah man.

Ringleader: Why!?

Me: I lost count, sir. I could be in trouble if my register doesn’t have the right amount of cash, and I don’t want to rip you off.

Ringleader: …

It’s about an hour later. My manager walks past, looks at me. I smile at him, and he looks at the counter. He walks away without a word. I eventually count all the change and surprisingly they had only $18!

Me: Hmm, I think that this is $18.

(The duo has been dead silent. They look done for the night.)

Me: I’ll recount it.

I fucking recounted it.

Me: I think this is actually $19.xx.

(Without a word, the Ringleader whips out a $5)

Me: Seriously? You had cash?

Ringleader: Needed to get rid of my change.

Me. No problem. I’ll just recount this again. I want to make perfectly sure that this is $19, since I counted $18 the first time.

Ringleader: Are you kidding me?

(I shake my head no, completely serious)

He takes out a $20 bill straight out of his pocket and throws it at me. My coworker gives the biggest WHAT THE FUCK face. Internally, I die as well, because they were smart enough to have a backup plan. And the fact that he was touching his cash in his pocket the entire time kinda messed with me. I take the cash, do the transaction, give him his change, thanked him and wished him a good night. The two start to put their pennies back in the ziplock bags and I didn’t help them at all. I watched them just as how they watched me. Lots of pennies dropped to the floor, but they didn’t care to pick them up. It looked like their souls were sucked out of them. It was past midnight and I clocked out way past when I was supposed to. A lot of my coworkers gave me a thumbs up or told me good night. Even my manager told me 'good job,’ the only two words he ever said to me. Went to bed at the dorms after such a great petty penny night and crashed. Strange to say, but I’d love to count pennies again.

TL;DR I recounted 1900 pennies like 5 times. Was it 5 times? I better count again.

My advice? Bring a book. Bring a book when you have meetings, bring a book when you go walking in the park. Bring a book to a first date. You don’t have to read it, that isn’t the point. Just having it with you is enough.
—  Everyone needs a backup plan
I absolutely LOVE people who pay with pennies!

(long story. tl;dr at the end)

Seriously. 4 years ago, I’m cashiering at a whacky mart on a register that holds all the smokes and alcohol. It’s 10pm and these two young men (early 20s) come up to the counter. They have three random novelty items (I don’t remember they were), but it was strange and unusual to get odd items this late at night. Maybe it was for some fraternity, I don’t know. It’s a college town so I get weird stuff from frats a lot. I scan the items and tell them their total is $22.xx.

Grinning at each other, they reach into their jackets and slam down two gallon zip-lock bags, full of only pennies. I stare them in the eye, but they didn’t even look back at me. Everyone else in line groan and went to other registers. These two kids knew what they were doing, but they didn’t know what they were in for because I prepared for this; I knew this was going to inevitably happen. I grinned with them, because I was gonna get paid during this. These pranksters are here for recreation. This convo occurs between Me, Ringleader (the other guy was silent and awkward), and a friendly coworker of mine.

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I think we need to normalize the idea of marrying friends. I don’t mean in a “the best romantic relationships come from the best friendships” type way, though I do believe that’s true. I mean in a “I have zero romantic feelings for you, but I would totally spend the rest of my life committed to a future where you are my primary partner and maybe even raise a family together” type way.

Like, I don’t think it should be an aromantic-exclusive option, or a plan B when you and your best friend are still single at 40 and want to take yourselves out of the dating market.

I’ve heard it mostly as that backup plan, that “if I don’t find anyone, I’ll just marry Trish haha”, and I don’t think that’s even what I’m talking about normalizing. That’s a secondary outcome, seen as “giving up” on finding “real love”, and even if a pair of friends go for it, it’s plagued with this general feeling of “sub par”.

What I mean is that marrying a best friend (or having a committed intimate or emotional platonic relationship) should be seen as just as worth doing as marrying someone you’re in love with. It should be normal for teenagers to try as many committed friendships as they do romantic relationships. It should be normal for someone to say “this is my best friend and if everything works out, maybe we’ll move in together later” or “Trish and I have been roommates for two years now. We’re considering adopting soon, or Trish might carry a child!”

And as an aromantic person, it shouldn’t be strange for me to say “I prefer friendship to romance”. People should hear that and nod their heads like “that’s understandable. John feels the same.”

Hell, I see so many people expressing that they prefer their friends’ company to their romantic partner’s. “My friends understand me better and I think treat me better” and they’re expected to go home to this person, to marry and have kids with this person. It’s bizarre to me. Your platonic feelings for your friend aren’t inferior to your romantic feelings for your boyfriend, and if one of them treats you better than the other, I think you should probably rethink which one is your primary partner.

I also find it strange that it’s not more common in poly spaces for a friend to be considered a legitimate “partner”. In a world where friendships were just as likely to bloom into life partnerships as romantic relationships, I think polyamory would be much more commonplace. “I committed to Josephine about a year ago and now we own a home, but I fell in love with Joe about six months ago and we’re all trying to make it work.” Josephine shouldn’t have to worry about her partner leaving her for Joe just because their bond is romantic and therefore the “sensible” relationship to choose over the other.

I’m just ranting at this point, but I reiterate: committed friendships should not be seen as strange and “sad”, but as a legitimate option for a lifetime commitment. Not just for aromantics like myself, but for everyone. It should just be normal.

And not to be presumptuous, but I don’t think I’m alone in this thinking

Even More Slytherin Things

-Casual flirting

-Rolling eyes

-Eyeliner and Jawline could stab

-Gossip with the mermaids

-Marble

-Using unnecessarily long words in an argument to annoy people

-Perfectly crafted insults

-High heels or literal hotel slippers there’s no in between

-Backup plan for the backup plan

-If you pretend to have the authority to do the thing, you will most likely get away with doing the thing

-Always has tea

-Very opinionated

-Vinyl

-Will call you out if you get undeserved attention

-Fancy planner with everything in it

-The best excuses

-Teachers pet only to be able to get away with more

-Shakespeare references

let’s talk about

Originally posted by pan-voltron

everyone loves this moment and I do to.  It’s perfectly delivered, perfectly set up and its a perfect conclusion to this whole jailbreak.  Lance gets his chance to shine and save the day.  So - can talk about the fact that - Shiro lets him.

I’ve already talked about how, if shit suddenly hits the fan, Shiro’s first response is action.  Someone else talked in their post about how he tends to leap in ahead of the others, even when one of the others might be more suited, simply because he has a meat-shield complex.  This is a split second moment.  They’ve got a chance for one attempt and one alone and if it fails, they’re going to have to go back in and do this the very, very hard way.  Shiro sees what’s happening.  He has a jet pack.  He’s capable of reacting and throwing himself into things and its his nature to.  But.

But Lance says he’s got this - and Shiro stays put.  Let’s talk about the level of trust in Lance, the level of faith in Lance’s competency, the fact that Shiro listens to Lance and accepts his assessment that this moment holds.  They’ve got one chance to do this right - and Shiro trusts Lance enough to let him take that chance.  He does it without a seconds hesitation.  He doesn’t say ‘are you sure?’, he doesn’t head back in in case Lance misses.  He stays put and let’s Lance do his thing, no backup plan or safety net in place.  No matter how Lance may see himself, Shiro very obviously proves here that he sees Lance as a competent and important part of the team and trusts him and his judgement in a time of crisis without hesitation.  Can we please put to rest the fanon interpretation that Shiro ignores or belittles Lance’s place as a member of Team Voltron.  Shiro listened to Lances judgement call and trusted him to make it.

How to Make Your Villain Domestic but Still Evil

It’s the oxymoron that attracts us. Billowing black cape, terrifying worldviews, a willingness to make the streets run red with blood – and you know what would be hilarious? Them trying and failing to make morning pancakes. You know what would really hit us in the feels? Watching them show tenderness around a special someone.

Having a villain with a domestic side is lassoing a black hole, and it’s a tantalizing thing to watch. However, anyone who’s indulged in these daydreams with their own villains has probably encountered one very specific issue: it makes them less evil. They lose their edge.

For example, look at Crowley from CW’s Supernatural. This was a guy to be feared at one point; arriving out of nowhere at unexpected times, always playing both sides of the conflict, and you could be certain he would skin anyone necessary to get what he wanted – usually without getting a single drop of blood on his impeccable suit.

Flash forward to recent seasons, and we’ve seen Crowley cry and whimper more times than Dean has died –which is saying something. At first, it was fascinating to discover this powerful character actually had a tender side; and now, when Crowley makes a threat, we’re about as afraid as when any low-level demon makes one. This is because his evil was too compromised. He let himself go.

How can we avoid this mistake with our villains? The answer isn’t making them crush puppies and hate butterflies at every turn; it’s in balancing their core scariness with their softer side – giving them complexity, giving us a bit of “aww,” and making their eventual whiplash back into ‘terrifying’ all the more wonderful.

For this, we’re going to use Epic of Lilith by Ivars Ozols as an example. This book centers on arguably the original female villain – Lilith, the first woman of the Garden of Eden, who got on the “good guys’” bad side by refusing to submit to someone who was clearly her equal. There won’t be any spoilers below, but if you give the book a read (it’s an easy page turner), the points will be driven home stronger.

Plus it’s a book with a great female villain who isn’t objectified (don’t let the cover fool you, seriously) and prose that isn’t full of sexual over- or undertones. Talk about a win, eh?

Here we go.    

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Things mentioned in the Sue Perkins interview that I want to hear Dan and Phil talk more about:

  • Phil talking about the negotiation period with his parents where he said he wanted to take a year after uni to see if he could make youtube work, and his parents agreeing - then Dan essentially doing the same a year later and taking a year out of uni to see if he could make youtube work.
  • The process of becoming overwhelmingly successful youtubers without ever actually having had a viral hit.
  • Numbers and revenue and how that plays into or works against creative inspiration, how much or little they let ad placement impact the videos that they do.
  • The fact that having a big audience sets them apart from other youtubers and allows them more creative freedom, and what role the gaming channel plays in that - how much of a crutch that is for them in content between main channel videos. (And I’d love it if they’d go into which one is actually more profitable still and what kind of ad revenue gaming videos get vs main channel ones.)
  • How personally they take press criticism toward youtubers, or whether they feel like having worked in a traditional industry as well sets them apart from other youtubers enough that they take it less personally.
  • They talked a very good talk in the panel about how much they respect young demographics for being open and engaged and progressive, but do they feel a disconnect because they’re not making content for a demographic they’re a part of and would they rather look at stats numbers and see people that they personally relate to responding to what they make?
  • Those “conversations” they had with BBC3 and BBC Comedy and what projects the timing wasn’t actually right for, as well as the process of making pitches that don’t go anywhere. (February of this year, perhaps?)
  • At what point in his career did Phil become desensitized to negative criticism? A look at his twitter from 2008 can confirm he was not always that way. Dan more or less evaded this question, I’d like to hear his answer as someone who tends to dwell on the negative.
  • A frank explanation of where they think youtube is going and if they have a backup plan for when they’re less relevant or if they’re financially set with side projects and investments already and are prepared for the fact that they’ve potentially already peaked in terms of revenue from youtube itself.