northern so

2

northern downpour - panic! at the disco

to be honest, i expected piracy in the future to involve a lot more airships and a lot less illegally downloaded music
2

northern downpour // panic! at the disco

4

Panic! At The Disco - Pretty. Odd. songs as eyeshadows.

8

The Sami people have lived in northern Scandinavia at least as long as the Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish majority, and they are therefore considered indigenous to this area. The Sami people are the minority everywhere except from Central Finnmark, Norway, where most still have Sami as their first language. Most Sami people live in Norway, but they also live in Sweden, Finland, Russia and Ukraine.

The Sami people were discriminated against for a long time, and the Sami languages were suppressed until after the Second World War. Things have changed a lot today. Sami is one of Norway’s official languages and there is no official discrimination of Sami people or languages in Norway, Sweden or Finland. Yet it is very likely that several of the smaller Sami languages will die out within a few decades because they have very few speakers. Northern Sami, however, is so sufficiently widespread that it will probably survive the foreseeable future.

2

make me choose:

@fragilecapricorn asked: live in chicago northern downpour vs bush hall northern downpour

Enough with this anti Otayuri crap.

Let’s start by saying that I’m not a hardcore Otayuri fan; I don’t mind them, I just like Viktuuri better. 

Now, ship hate is nothing new: always has been, always will be -cause some people are just incapable of sharing their opinions without bashing and flaming. You have the right to dislike a certain ship if it’s toxic or unhealthy (like Sasuke/Sakura for me) or abusive (like Sangwoo/Yoonbum for me… still read KS though, I’m a sucker for psychological horror) or illegal (like Sebastian/Ciel in probably every industrialized country in the world, but I mind my own business), or simply triggering. You have the right to state your reasons.

You don’t have the right to be an asshole without a reason though.

Here a piece of advice: you think that Otabek is a pedophile? That Otayuri is unacceptable for age reasons?


WRONG.


If it makes you feel that way, it’s your opinion. Your own perception. If thinking about a relationship between two teenagers of 16 and 19 respectively makes you feel uncomfortable because your idea of age of consent is different from the one stated by the law, it’s a matter of opinion. Every opinion matters, but you have to keep in mind that Otayuri has shippers from all over the world, and the age of consent might vary. 

Here’s some data:

In many countries (at least in most of European/Western countries) the age of consent is set at 14-16. For example, where I come from (Italy, one of the most close-minded country I’ve ever seen, but things are slowly changing, thank God) it’s perfectly acceptable to have sex if you’re at least 14 -of course the consent is invalidated with partners who have custody or some kind of institutional power over you). In Italy you can even have sex at 13, but in this case your partner must be a minor him/herself and 3 years older tops, otherwise it’s punishable. So in Europe Otayuri is generally legal.

I don’t know much about American law, but I know for sure that A) the age of consent varies from State to State, and B) the most common one is 16. Same goes for Canada. So in Northern America Otayuri is generally legal as well. 

Yuri!!!! on Ice is a Japanese show. Kubo Mitsoru is Japanese. In Japan the age of consent is set at 13 (although in some prefectures every sexual act conducted on a minor is considered illegal, while in Tokyo the age consent is 17). Guess what? With some variation, in Japan Otayuri is legal.

In Kazakistan? Here the age of consent is set at 16, regardless of consent and sexual orientation (yes, in some countries taking it up the ass makes a difference, don’t ask me why). I’m getting tired of repeating myself, but according to the law of Kazakistan Otayuri is legal. 

This leaves Russia. “Article 134. Sexual Intercourse and Other Actions of Sexual Character with a Person Who Has Not Reached the Age of Sixteen Years: Sexual intercourse committed by a person who has reached the age of eighteen years with a person who has not reached the age of sixteen years shall be punishable […]”. That means that even in Nohomoland™ Otayuri would be legal. 

So, as you can see, most of these antis are not simply stating their opinion, which would be their right if they were to respect others as well. Otayuri is legal in almost every industrialized country (Arabia and Islamic countries are another matter, and I’m definetly not getting started on that), so why the fuck are people talking about pedophilia?!? Do you even know what a pedophile is? Apparently you don’t, and you’re lucky you don’t. 

A pedophile is the old beggar at the corner of the street who tried to shove his hands under my sister’s shirt when she was 5. A pedophile is a sick person, a dangeros person, a criminal who lusts after children. 

If that’s what you think of this when you watch YOI and see an Otayuri moment, then you’re lucky enough to not know what a real pedophile is. 

Keep in mind that every data I collected is taken from the Internet, since I’m not a law student nor I have access to legal data from the other side of the world, but I tried to be as accurate as possible. What I’m trying to say is that, if Otayuri makes you feel uncomfortable because of the age difference, you don’t have to bash other people because of it: every country has its own code in the matter, although there’s a general tendency, and that has nothing to do with ship wars. And keep in mind that the age of consent matter is an ongoing debate because it has little to do with age per se and more with psychological maturity. I mean, if we were to listen to Mother Nature, women would have the right to have sex at 12, 10 in some cases, since their bodies can bear children, right? 

It. Is. A. Matter. Of. Perspective. 

Mixed Black African Girl (Cameroonian/French)

I’m a mixed black african girl who grew up and lived most of her life in Cameroon, in Central Africa. My dad is half-white (french) and half-black (cameroonian), and my mom is 100% cameroonian. There’s little to no black african characters in popular fiction, which has always bothered me, and it would be so nice to read about someone like me for once.

  • Culture and food

Cameroon is a country created during colonization, with borders defined by europeans. Because of that, Cameroon is actually made of 200 ethnic groups, each of them having their own language and culture. So the culture and daily habits vary a lot depending on which region of Cameroon you are in. In the big cities, though, everyone is mingled no matter where they’re from. However, so many different ethnic groups cohabiting together often causes tension. There are also a lot of stereotypes about every ethnic group.

I grew up in the central and coastal areas of the country, and I’m Bassa. The Bassa are one of the main ethnic groups in Cameroon. If your parents are from two different ethnic groups, it is decided that you officially belong to your father’s ethnic group. My mother is Bakoko but my father is Bassa, so I’m the latter. When I meet another Cameroonian, two of the first questions we usually ask each other are : What are you (meaning, what’s your ethnic group) ? and Where is you village ?

Villages are very important in the Cameroonian culture. Your village is where your father’s ancestors were born. Even if you’re not born there, you usually have grandparents or great-uncles or family friends living there, and if you have enough money to do so you must regularly visit your village. And usually, when people earn enough money, they send money to their village so that people living there can have a better life, build more houses and schools etc.

Cameroonian food is very diverse, and varies depending on the region. The national dish is Ndolé, a dish made with ndolé leaves, stewed nuts, and meat (fish, beef or shrimps). Other common foods are bobolo and miondo (food made out of fermented manioc), soya (spicy grilled meat on skewers), and plantain. My dad is half-french though, so at home we eat almost as much french food as cameroonian food (crème brûlée, shepherd’s pie, beef bourguignon, A LOT of bread and cheese).

  • Language

There are hundreds of different languages, but the official languages are French and English. Cameroon was colonized by France and England so Northern Cameroon mainly speaks english and central/southern Cameroon mainly speaks french. Most people also speak their ethnic group’s language. I don’t know how to speak Bassa, though, because neither do my parents. When me and my siblings were kids, our dad asked our baby-sitter to teach us, but she could only do so much and I only remember a few words.

  • Beauty Standards

Like most countries, there is a lot of colorism in Cameroon based on European beauty standards. When you’re a woman, the lighter you are, the prettier and more desirable you are considered. Dark skinned women are often mocked and considered not as pretty. A lot of people, mainly women but also men, use dangerous products to lighten their skin. Internalized racism and white beauty standards are very insidious, and a lot of people want to look like white people, including me when I was younger. As a kid I remember wishing i was a pretty blonde-haired blue-eyed white girl like the heroines of the books i was reading. Growing up I stopped wishing that, but I relaxed and straightened my hair a lot, wanting to have long straight hair without realizing that it was still an attempt to look like the ideal version of a white girl. I’m sure that if I had more black female characters to relate to when I was growing up, I wouldn’t have spend so many years hating myself without even realizing I was doing it.

Also, Cameroonians usually consider thick, curvy women to be the ideal beauty standard. But being thin is still an ideal broadcast by the media (especially that american and european media are heavily broadcast and consumed in Cameroon) so most women still diet a lot and go to the gym to lose weight.

  • Clothing

Women wear a lot of skirts and dresses, be it casual or for work. Most cameroonian schools have uniforms and mandatory hairstyles (either cornrows or short shaved hair).

Elderly people often wear more traditional clothes and outfits. The most prominent traditional item of clothing is the Kaba. The Kaba is a long dress made of wax fabric and other materials and is owned by pretty much every woman. The dress looks different depending on the situation : the Kaba you wear when you stay at home is usually very long and very loose, the Kaba you wear during official/formal events is more tight-fitting and stylized, etc.

  • Dating and Relationships

I’ve never dated anyone, but when I was in high school none of my friends ever told their parents they were seeing someone. Having your parents know about and meet the person you’re dating after only a few weeks or months is something that just doesn’t happen (unless someone gets pregnant). It’s when things get serious that you introduce them to your family. Also, a lot of parents would prefer their children to marry someone from the same ethnic group.

Homosexuality is still illegal there, and you can go to jail for being gay.

  • Home/Family life

My parents are still happily married, and I have 3 siblings. My parents are both close to their siblings, and I’m close to mine. Me and my siblings grew up with our cousins, we were always at each other’s houses. I pretty much consider most of my cousins as extra siblings. We have a very big extended family and every day I discover new distant cousins, aunts, great-uncles etc. My dad being half-french, when I was growing up we sometimes went to France during summer to visit his relatives living there.

In Cameroon, most people who have enough money to do so send their children to study abroad once they’ve graduated high school. I’m currently living in France for my studies, and most of my high school friends are also going to college in France, England, Canada, Brussels, South Africa etc.

  • Identity issues

Despite being only ¼ white, I’m very light-skinned. My siblings being much darker skinned, when I was a kid I thought I was adopted (i’m not, it’s just genetics). Cameroon being a black country, when someone is visibly mixed and light-skinned as i am, most people just label them “white”. A lot of people would refer to me as “the white” and it always really hurt me. My family wouldn’t understand why i was so angry and hurt, they’d say “they don’t mean anything by it, it’s just that you’re light” but the fact is it made me feel like i don’t belong. I’m cameroonian, i’ve lived in Cameroon almost my entire life, i’m black, and still some people see me as “other”, they see me as white. And so for a long time, I didn’t dare to call myself black, I’d say “I’m biracial” or “I’m mixed” instead because I somehow felt like a fraud. But I’m black and not white-passing at all, and I still experience racism abroad (but I’m aware I have a lot more privilege than dark skinned people).

  • Daily struggles

So I’m currently living in France. On one hand, sometimes white people are racist toward me, or just totally obnoxious and ignorant, trying to touch my natural hair and thinking that people in Cameroon don’t have computers or whatever. On the other hand, when I randomly meet other cameroonians and we start talking, they always assume that because i’m mixed i’ve lived my entire life in France and i don’t know anything about Cameroon. And there’s nothing wrong with being a child of immigrants and not knowing the country your parents or grandparents came from, but i know that if i wasn’t visibly mixed they wouldn’t question the fact that i know Cameroon and lived there my entire life.

  • Misconceptions

Because of how the media depict African countries, a lot of people think that everyone in Africa is extremely poor and starving, that we don’t have electricity and internet and that everyone lives in huts. Which is so false. We have rich people and poor people, we have huge modern cities and regular cities and small villages with huts, almost everyone has access to a tv and internet, etc.

  • Things I’d like to see less of

Cameroon and other african countries being depicted as poor unfortunate countries where everyone is starving and illiterate and waiting for the generous white people to save us. What we need is for people to see us as the humans we are, and to allow us to grow in peace.

  • Things I’d like to see more of

Black african characters being written as the complex human beings we are. Shy black african characters. Nerdy and hella smart black african characters. Mixed black african characters who struggle with their identity. LGBTQ black african characters.

  • Tropes/Stereotypes I’m tired of seeing.

The “savage”, “uncivilized” african. African characters who are aggressive, dumb and shout all the time. The poor africans in need of saving by white people.

Read more POC Profiles here or submit your own.