northern lighthouse board

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Good Morning from Scotland 

Turnberry Lighthouse at dawn by Ian Cowe

The Flannan Isles Mystery

The Flannan Isles (also known as the Seven Hunters), named after an Irish priest called St. Flannan, have been the subject of a 100+ year old mystery.
On December 15th, 1900 the crew of a passing ship, the Fairwind, were angry and surprised that no guiding light from the newly-built Flannan Isles lighthouse appeared to be in operation. This was unusual since the lighthouse was always operational. The crew from the Fairwind decided to investigate. 

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Good Morning from Scotland

Dawn at Scurdie Ness, Angus by Ian Cowe

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The Mull of Galloway from the air by Ian Cowe
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Scotland’s most southerly point

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Good Morning from Scotland

Little Ross lighthouse, Kirkcudbrightshire by Ian Cowe
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One of the first lighthouses to be designed by Alan Stevenson, it was first lit in 1843. Little Ross Lighthouse would have a fairly undistinguished history had it not been the scene of a murder in August 1960 where the local relief keeper was killed by another keeper who had only been in the lighthouse service a short time (it later turned out that he had a criminal record). Ironically, a representative from the Northern Lighthouse Board arrived on the island a short time later that same day to give the news that the lighthouse was about to be automated.

As promised Ailsa Craig  with Turnberry lighthouse..

24 metres high, with 76 steps to the top, the Turnberry Lighthouse has marked the coastline in these parts since 1873. Rising out of the mists to greet ships for over a hundred years, this quintessential icon is one of Turnberry’s most powerful charms. Originally commissioned by the Northern Lighthouse Board to warn passing vessels away from nearby Bristo Rock, the lighthouse is the oldest man-made structure on the Turnberry premises-with the exception of the remains of the 13th-century castle of Robert the Bruce that it marks.