north-street

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England;NorthYorkshire-   York, Robin Hoods Bay, Staithes, Arncliffe, Yorkshire Dales, Grassington,York, Whitby, Hutton-Le-Hole

-for more  of my UK shots and more travel:travel britain european travel world travel UK travel London travel

Photographer Ann Sophie Lindström spent several months documenting  a group of horsemen in North Philadelphia who have been countering crime through their love for horses.  For more riveting photos of the equestrians of North Philly, here’s this week’s Spotlight essay from Emily Anne Epstein.

A stallion named Dusty rears up as Jamil Prattis, 25, leads him to the lot across from the Fletcher Street Stables, October 19, 2013. Jamil became involved with the horses when he was 12 years old, after he saw a group of urban cowboys riding through the streets of North Philadelphia. (Ann Sophie Lindström)

Jamil Prattis sits in front of his house on French Street, May 23, 2014. (Ann Sophie Lindström)

Stephfon Darnell Tolbert, 31, teases a pony named Harlem, making him rear up, October 2, 2013. Harlem is known for being aggressive when someone gets too close. (Ann Sophie Lindström

A horse is tied up in front of a vacant lot on Fletcher Street while horsemen clean the stalls, October 6, 2016. (Ann Sophie Lindström

Stable manager Edward E. Ward cuddles a horse named Maverick, September 29, 2013. (Ann Sophie Lindström

Tymeir Sanders, 17, stops by a friend’s house on West Harold Street while out on a ride with Rosie, June 1, 2014. (Ann Sophie Lindström

Stephfon Darnell Tolbert, 24, prepares feed for the horses, October 16, 2016. The horsemen have tack rooms where they keep supplies, feed, and hay. (Ann Sophie Lindström

Donnell Glenn takes Cash out for an evening walk, October 9, 2013. (Ann Sophie Lindström

Stevie Spann, 50, checks on the horses before closing the stable for the evening, August 22, 2014.  (Ann Sophie Lindström)

Jamil Prattis, Stevie Spann, and Nate Benson sit inside a horse trailer to escape the sun and smoke, May 25, 2014. (Ann Sophie Lindström)

There is no indoor arena at the Fletcher Stable, so the horsemen like use the vacant lot across the street to train their animals, October 6, 2013. (Ann Sophie Lindström

Romere Burch,13, rides bareback on a stallion named Ace N da Whole on Glennwood Avenue, October 3, 2013. (Ann Sophie Lindström

#SherlockLives: The Resurrection

The day is April 23rd, 2017.  It’s an ordinary Sunday afternoon in London.

The crowd bustles, trains whirr, birds chirp.

Life in the city is business as usual.

Three teenage girls take photographs outside 187 North Gower Street, soaking in the ambiance of the Sherlock set.  They step into Speedy’s for a cup of coffee.

The women lament over the loss of their favorite show. On March 8th, the BBC announced Sherlock would not be returning for a fifth series, and cowriters Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss were quick to assure their fans that it was time to lay the beloved program to rest.

But what the women saw next changed their lives forever.

Keep reading

i saw a similar post about writing tips when it comes to having paris as a setting, so i thought it would be helpful to have the same thing except for……new york city! as a native new yorker i love seeing my home appearing in fics, because lbr nyc is pretty awesome. so if you’re looking to make nyc your setting, here are some tips when writing about it. these can help establish if your character is a native or non-native.

—first off, nyc is technically not one city. it’s five cities. the boroughs of manhattan, queens, staten island, bronx, and brooklyn are all part of nyc. however, the nyc that’s always on tv/movies is manhattan.

—if you live in any of the four other boroughs, manhattan is always referred to as “the city”. so if your character lives in brooklyn but is heading out to central park, they’re going to the city.

—public transportation is the way to go. unless it’s staten island, where cars are the easiest way to go. mta fare is $2.75 and we use metrocards. trains are divided by uptown and downtown, and some are express and some are local. we do not refer to the train lines by their color—only by their number or letter. buses are designated by their borough; a manhattan bus would have M in front of the number.

—taxis are mad expensive and sometimes public transportation can be too when you need to take a combo of buses and trains. many new yorkers walk a lot. the reason we walk fast is bc it makes it easier to get to your destination. walking up ten blocks can only take ten minutes if you speedwalk basically. which is why slow walkers annoy us, especially when they stop suddenly.

—trains run slower during weekends and nights so your character might be in for quite a wait. bus generally take 10 minutes to come, unless it’s a popular route. then buses come every five minutes.

—except for the very southern part of manhattan, the roads are numbered. so areas such as greenwich village, wall street, little italy, and chinatown do not have streets with numbers. streets run from east to west; avenues run from south to north. the east & west streets are separated by 5th Avenue. numbers increase as you move north and/or to the west.

—you can always find pizza and hot dogs for a dollar. busy areas such as times square and central park will try to overcharge you. no new yorker would be gullible enough to pay $2 for a pizza slice. for cheap $1 pizza, the chain 2Bros is good. speaking of pizza, we fold it in half bc it is easier to eat and walk then.

—a distinctly new yorker thing is saying “on the line”. such as asking someone “are you on the line?” no other state says this. drive into new jersey and they’ll say “in the line”.

—there is one international airport and one domestic airport for nyc, which are both in queens. there’s JFK (international) and La Guardia (domestic). a third option is newark airport (also international) in new jersey.

—smoking is not allowed in nyc parks nor in most public spaces whatsoever. also the legal age for smoking and drinking is 21.

—if your character is a college student, all public colleges are branded as CUNY (City University of New York). every borough has at least one CUNY college. public colleges have “cheap” tuition rates, which are usually around $5000-$8000. the “famous” colleges in NYC are not public. NYU and Columbia are both private and are ridiculously expensive. Wagner College (private) in Staten Island has a really good performing arts/music program.

—new yorkers avoid many of the sightseeing places bc they’re expensive and overcrowded. i have lived my whole life in nyc (almost 20 years) and have only visited the Empire State Building for the first time this summer—and that’s only bc my internship covers the expense of my tickets to such places.

—speaking of expenses, most of the homes in the boroughs are apartments. Staten Island however is suburban and residential. houses are abundant there. in manhattan, houses which are really just townhouses, are super expensive. we’re talking millions here.

—manhattan is an island. so is staten island. the only ways off manhattan are by cars/buses over bridges or tunnels, or by trains. the only way off staten island is by car, bus, or the Staten Island Ferry. the ferry is free of charge, running 24/7 between SI and Manhattan. all bridges have tolls, where ezpass holders have lower rates.

—yes we’re the city that never sleeps, but we do sleep. some areas like times square don’t appear to. i’ve shopped at the forever 21 in times square at 1 AM. it was still crowded.

—SI has a predominant Italian and Sri Lankan community. Queens has a predominant Indian community, most especially in the Jackson Heights neighborhood.

—coney island is in brooklyn. the rides are fun but expensive. the beach is crowded and dirty. brighton beach and rockaway beach are better choices. staten island has a more calmer (and actually fourth longest in the usa) boardwalk.

—if you’re mailing something to manhattan, the address should be written as new york, new york. it would not be manhattan, new york.

this got really long but if your heart is set on writing within new york, i think it’s really important to get your setting right. like i said before, these tips can really help your character stand out or not as someone who is or isn’t from new york. i hope this helps for all the fabulous writers out there!

Signs as things that are mine

Aries- This mailbox
Taurus- this instrumental break
Gemini- The month of June
Cancer- That birdie’s tweets
Leo- Everything that I see
Virgo- The floor and ceiling
Libra- That blue balloon
Scorpio- All your feelings
Sagittarius- The city streets
North, south, east and west
Capricorn- both your feet
Aquarius- this triagonal sign
Pisces- Ziggy’s sweets

2

Jeffrey Dahmer Timeline

May 21st 1960- Birth

June 18th 1978- Murdered Steven Mark Hicks (remains found in a crawlspace under his home and his bones found in woodland behind Jeffrey’s home)

January 1979- Jeffrey enlisted in the U.S. Army

March 1981- Formally discharged from the Army due to his alcohol abuse

August 7th 1982 – Jeffrey exposed himself to a crowd of 25 women and children at Wisconsin State Fair Park.

August 1986 – Arrested for masturbating in front of two 12-year-old boys

March 10th 1987- The charge was changed to disorderly conduct and was sentenced to one year’s probation.

November 20th- Murdered Steven Tuomi in a rented room at the Ambassador Hotel (remains never located)

January 16th 1988- Murdered James Doxtator (remains never located)

March 24th- Murdered Richard Guerrero (remains never located)

March 25th 1989- Murdered Anthony Sears (His preserved skull and genitals found in a filing cabinet at 924 North 25th Street)

May 20th 1990- Murdered Raymond Smith *The first victim to be murdered at Jeffrey’s North 25th Street apartment* (Bones were around his apartment as ornaments and his sjull was painted grey and placed in his fridge)

June 14th – Murdered Edward Smith (remains never located)

September 2nd – Murdered Ernest Miller (His entire skeleton was found in the bottom drawer of a filing cabinet)

September 24th – Murdered David Thomas (remains never located)

February 18th 1991- Murdered Curtis Straughter (Skull was found in his apartment)

April 7th– Murdered Errol Lindsey (Skull found in his apartment)

May 24th – Murdered Tony Hughes (Skull found in his apartment)

May 27th – Murdered Konerak Sinthasomphone (Skull located in the freezer)

June 30th- Murdered Matt Turner (Head and internal organs found in the freezer and his torso was in a 57-gallon drum)

July 5th – Murdered Jeremiah Weinberger (Torso located in the 57-gallon drum)

July 15th -Murdered Oliver Lacy (Skeleton was found in his apartment and his heart was in the fridge)

July 19thMurdered Joseph Bradehoft (Head was found in the refrigerator and torso found in the 57-gallon drum)

July 22nd – Persuaded Tracy Edwards to accompany him back his apartment. Tracy escaped his apartment and flagged down Milwaukee police. Jeffrey was then arrested.

July 25th- After admitting to the murders, Jeffrey was charged with four counts of murder.

August 22nd- Charged with a further 11 murders.

September 17th – Charged with the murder of Steven Hicks

January 13th 1992 – Jeffrey pleaded guilty but insane to 15 counts of murder at a preliminary hearing

January 30th– His trial began

February 15th – The verdict was made, on the first two counts, Dahmer was sentenced to life imprisonment plus ten years, with the remaining 13 counts carrying a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment plus 70 years.

May 1st Jeffrey was extradited to Ohio to be tried for the murder of Steven Hicks. He was sentenced to a 16th term of life imprisonment.

July 1994- While in prison, Jeffrey was attacked by Osvaldo Durruthy and his throat was attempted to be slashed with a razor embedded toothbrush. Jeffrey was not seriously hurt in this incident.

November 28th 1994- Jeffrey was attacked by fellow inmate Christopher Scarver while in the showers. He had been bludgeoned over his head and face by a metal bar. Jeffrey was later pronounced dead at hospital.

3

Ladies and gentlemen, I’d like to introduce you to tired college freshman in his moose pajamas, Neil Armstrong. The dorms were full that year, so he ended up living in a house in North street with a few other guys. In the top image, he has what appears to be a ripped piece of construction paper in a slide rule that he is flying around like an airplane. The second and third are pretty self explanatory, and are absolutely adorable.
Photos courtesy of the amazing folks at the Purdue Archives and Special Collections.

Been thinking and writing a lot about real experiences I’ve had at university, through the lens of ‘maybe my school has some Fair Folk hanging around.’ Tbh, makes some stuff make a lot more sense. Enjoy: the adventures of the students at Elsewhere University who have no idea about the fae, but just notice that sometimes stuff is weird: In the corner of the dining hall, someone is always almost done a paper they never seem to finish. They are there every time you walk in, no matter what hour of day or night. You wonder when they sleep. It doesn’t occur to you to wonder if they sleep.  The basement tunnels wind under your dorm. You were just looking for the laundry room, but you have been walking an awfully long time. The motion-detecting lights keep flickering ahead of you though. Maybe if you keep following them, you’ll find your way.  At the end of the party, there are a half dozen half empty beer cans sitting around. You plan to clean up in the morning, and by the time you do so they are already empty.  You put “free pizza!” on the flyer for his event. When it rolls around, far more people show up than you expect. Some are strangely dressed, or look somehow both too old and too young to be students. Do they even go here? Where were they summoned from?  Your professor’s apparent annoyance at students showing up to their clearly scheduled and openly publicized office hours confuses you at first. At a certain point though, it begins to look like fear. They always gesture to the bowl of candy on their desk.

Feel free to take some!

 they say every time, as though you might have forgotten, as though you might have been forbidden otherwise, as a pacifying gesture.  You plan to take a five minute break from work. When you look up from your phone again, an hour has passed. You pause to quickly reply to an email, and realize that everyone has left the library. You think, I’ll just check Facebook to see if I have any notifications, and notice that the sun has already risen.  You’ve been protesting the university’s investments for years, but don’t know the names of the people who make the decisions. There is the school president, but it’s past her, even past the management company. Perhaps it’s a guy in a cubicle with a laptop, diversifying portfolios and calculating returns. Then again, maybe it’s something else that controls the endowment’s hoard. Maybe that’s why it likes feeding on such darkness – war, apartheid, prisons, oil.  When you go to a party at a frat house, don’t accept their food or drink. Don’t drink anything you haven’t poured yourself. Otherwise, you don’t know where or when you’ll wake up. You don’t know how long it will take to escape this night.  You wonder sometimes if there are passageways in the library – closets and bookshelves and bathroom stalls that lead somewhere else. You see people walking in to the library with sleeping bags and boxes of groceries, especially during finals week. You sometimes see them wandering around in their socks, looking lost. You see them leave, occasionally, and when the sun hits them they look as though they have been away for a while.  You’re supposed to drop your paperwork off in the registrars office. You search online for it, but only come up with a website that hasn’t been redesigned since 2004. It lists the building name, which you’ve never heard of, and no address. You search the building name and find two “halls” and one “house” with the name. When you go to each of them, they tell you that the registrar has never been there, but it’s up the main street, head north away from campus, you can’t miss it. You discover a building that though you’ve walked this way hundreds of times, you never noticed before. It’s open and they give you candy and more paperwork to get filled out. Every time you go back afterwards, it’s locked and dark, although the hours posted on the door say it should be open. You decide not to drop that class after all.  You and your friend decide to room together, and for the first few months get along great. You decorate together, you buy house plants, she gives you a necklace shaped like a silver feather that she found doing end of year clean up. You’re not sure when things start to get weird, but the day after Halloween you notice she seems mad and when you ask what’s up she says she doesn’t consider you a friend she doesn’t like you and would you just go away. For the rest of the year, things continue with pretty much that tone, and you’re never quite sure what happened. You survive the year, painfully, and leave campus for the summer. You run in to her in New York at a friend’s birthday party. After avoiding her most of the night, she catches you on your way out. She says she is so excited to see you, she’s missed you so much, and gives you a huge hug. A few years later, you take a four person class together, and she’ll reminisce about when you were roomies. She only ever tells stories from before Halloween. You wonder if she only remembers those. You wonder if she was only there for those.

[x]

4

The nine rowhouses a few blocks from Johns Hopkins Hospital stood for more than a century, through waves of immigration, two world wars, the upending of the city’s economy and a shift in its racial makeup.

The arched windows along the 900 block of North Bradford Street reflected both the boom and the decline of a great American city: the prosperous midcentury, when all nine households could afford the Formstone that covered their brick fronts; the tumult of 1968, when residents could smell the smoke from nearby riots; the white flight that would open the street to African Americans and the drug wars that would drive many of them away.

Since it was built on an old brickyard in 1905 by the “two-story king of East Baltimore,” hundreds of people have called the block home.

But only one of them was there to see that history end.

Block by block, Baltimore is demolishing its blight – and pieces of its past. 

Read more here: Life, death and demolition