north korean prison camps

blue-who-you2  asked:

Yo no one in auradon is as innocent as they like to play. There's this saying 'evil is not born it is created' You cannot sit up here and tell me that these villains became villains just because. Ex. Poseidan raped Medusa in Athenas temple, and she's seen as a bad guy while Poseidan is admired. And how the hell do you punish children for their parents actions, what is this a North Korean prison camp? This makes them more cruel than the actual villains

I’m totally on this with you! I always thought that it was very cruel of them to reprimand all the villains, and even their childer, on an isle without any possibility to change?!?!?! Isnt that what disney film are always about? it should be like that for the villains too

The drawing above is one of many by a North Korean concentration camp prisoner who managed to escape from living hell. Each of his drawings are based on various things he witnessed in the elusive camp. The one above shows the horrific moment a pregnant woman was savagely executed by cruel officers. The unnamed escapee said that pregnancy was prohibited within the camp and if a woman managed to get pregnant, the guards would slice open her belly, throw the fetus away and execute her.

youtube

친구야 내 소원을 들어주어 - Please Grant My Wish!

An animated film about North Korean political prison camps, produced by Open Radio for North Korea based in Seoul. This film is based on a story written by an 11-year-old South Korean girl. She said that when she saw the news about the repatriation of nine North Korean children in May last year, she felt guilty, as she is a girl of the same age as them. Thereafter she decided to write a childrens story so that teenagers could understand the tragic reality of North Korea.

Yes, North Korea has long been ruled by an eccentric dynasty of portly dictators with bad haircuts. Yes, the propaganda the regime regularly trumpets to shore up its cult of personality is largely ridiculous. And yes, we on the outside know better, and can take comfort in pointing fingers and chuckling at the regime’s foibles.

But it takes no valor and costs precious little to joke about these things safely oceans away from North Korea’s reach. When a North Korean inmate in a political prison camp or a closely monitored Pyongyang apparatchik pokes fun at Kim Jong Un and the system he represents—that is an act of audacity. It very literally can cost the person’s life, and those of his or her family members. To pretend that punchlines from afar, even in the face of hollow North Korean threats, are righteous acts is nonsense.

It takes no valor and costs precious little to joke about these things oceans away from North Korea’s reach.
What’s more, crowding the North Korea “story” with anecdotes of nutty behavior and amusing delusions may ironically benefit those in charge in Pyongyang. It serves to buffer and obscure the sheer evil of a regime that enslaves children and sentences entire families to death for crimes of thought, while building ski resorts, dolphinariums, and other luxury escapes for elites with funds that could feed its malnourished people for several years. How many people would have watched The Interview and concluded that they should do something to help change this odious regime and bring about human rights for North Koreans?

In Charlie Chaplin’s 1964 autobiography, the star discussed the backlash that he faced from Hollywood and the German and British governments when plans for The Great Dictator’s release were announced. He moved forward with the project despite these concerns, but years later suggested that he regretted that decision: “Had I known of the actual horrors of the German concentration camps, I could not have made The Great Dictator; I could not have made fun of the homicidal insanity** of the Nazis.”

Kim Jong Un is human, too. I am sure he is, as executives and actors involved in The Interview tried to portray him, a “complex” and “multidimensional” man. But he and his barons are also representative of a singularly horrific system, one in which the scale and scope of suffering among 25 million North Koreans does not, as a recent United Nations inquiry noted, “have any parallel in the contemporary world.”

North Korea is not funny. It is hard to imagine a comparable comedy emerging about quirky Islamic State slavers or amusing and “complicated” genocidaires in the Central African Republic. The suffering in question is happening now, as I write.

The day will soon come when North Koreans are finally free, and liberated concentration camp survivors will have to learn that the world was more interested in the oddities of the oppressors than the torment of the oppressed.

— 

North Korea Is Not Funny: Let’s be clear: The Interview isn’t a courageous act of defiance against a dictator" by Adrian Hong

**ABLEISM! While the above is super important (that’s why I posted it), NEVER ASSOCIATE/ESSENTIALIZE NAZIS AND/OR HOMICIDAL PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS!! 

But it takes no valor and costs precious little to joke about these things safely oceans away from North Korea’s reach. When a North Korean inmate in a political prison camp or a closely monitored Pyongyang apparatchik pokes fun at Kim Jong Un and the system he represents—that is an act of audacity. It very literally can cost the person’s life, and those of his or her family members. To pretend that punchlines from afar, even in the face of hollow North Korean threats, are righteous acts is nonsense.

What’s more, crowding the North Korea “story” with anecdotes of nutty behavior and amusing delusions may ironically benefit those in charge in Pyongyang. It serves to buffer and obscure the sheer evil of a regime that enslaves children and sentences entire families to death for crimes of thought, while building ski resorts, dolphinariums, and other luxury escapes for elites with funds that could feed its malnourished people for several years.

—  “North Korea is Not Funny”, Adrian Hong

Yes, North Korea has long been ruled by an eccentric dynasty of portly dictators with bad haircuts. Yes, the propaganda the regime regularly trumpets to shore up its cult of personality is largely ridiculous. And yes, we on the outside know better, and can take comfort in pointing fingers and chuckling at the regime’s foibles.

But it takes no valor and costs precious little to joke about these things safely oceans away from North Korea’s reach. When a North Korean inmate in a political prison camp or a closely monitored Pyongyang apparatchik pokes fun at Kim Jong Un and the system he represents—that is an act of audacity. It very literally can cost the person’s life, and those of his or her family members. To pretend that punchlines from afar, even in the face of hollow North Korean threats, are righteous acts is nonsense.

— 

From “North Korea Is Not Funny” by Adrian Hong.

The Interview is a pile of bullshit. 

Why is it that no one seems to give a shit about North Korea until they make a threat against the US? Before you scoff and think to yourself, “Well they are threatening a nuclear war, so that’s why!” just hear me out. We all know that North Korea has released propaganda regarding their threat against South Korea, and the US. Yes, these threats are a serious issue, but let’s take this sudden spotlight on North Korea, and turn it on the complete disregard for FUNDAMENTAL HUMAN RIGHTS that occurs in this country. Instead of making jokes about Kim Jong-Un, let’s campaign against him, and bring awareness to his heinous crimes against humanity. Instead of ignoring the issues, let’s try to understand what actually happens inside of North Korea. Let’s try to understand what goes on inside North Korea TODAY.


In North Korea TODAY, there are an estimated 200 000 people living in political prison camps. 200 000 people without access to the outside world. 200 000 people being tortured, and forced to obey, and even executed in the streets. 200 000 people  who have no hope of escaping, or finding anything better because if they are caught trying, they face torture, and death, and then the torture and death of their families. These people are forced into these camps without proper trial, and kept there for life. Their children are born into these camps, and kept there for life. These people are slaves. Their children are slaves. Their children’s children are slaves. An estimated 200 000 people live in North Korean prison camps, and we can’t bother to know, or care if we do know. 

So educate yourself. Learn about North Korea. Research their prison camps, and familiarize yourself with what’s current. YOU CAN LOOK UP THE CAMPS ON GOOGLE MAPS. Seriously, google: North Korean Prison Camps google maps. You can see pictures of the camps, and see proof that they are actually there.

Don’t just turn a blind eye. Don’t joke about Kim Jong-Un. He is a monster, and he deserves to be held accountable for what he allows within his country. 

An estimated 200 000 people are currently living in North Korean prison camps. These camps have been compared to the Nazi concentration camps. We are living in a modern day Holocaust, and many of us don’t even know about it.