norman candid

The American people will never knowingly adopt socialism, but under the name of liberalism, they will adopt every fragment of the socialist program, until one day America will be a socialist nation without ever knowing how it happened.
—  Norman Thomas, Socialist Candidate for President of the United States 1944

A look back at SDCC 2014 with The Walking Dead’s Steven Yeun & Norman Reedus.  

Photo by Rodelio Astudillo.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram for more photos from last year’s SDCC, as well as pics of all your favorite TV celebs at this year’s event! 

bigbaldhead//Norman Reedus

In which you complain about Norman always taking candid shots and videos of you and posting them on social media 


____________________________________________________________ “Psst” he whispers.

 I turned around and he had the camera pointed at me, huge grin on his face

 “Shit Norman! I have no pants on and I’m cleaning while you sit there on your phone” I yell. 

“I love you” he says snickering.

 “I hate you” I tell him with a pout. 

“That’s not what you were saying last night” a smirk filled his face. 

I gasped. 

“That’s more like it” 

“Norman!” I yell and reach for his phone. 

I fell on top of him as he held the phone above him. He still worked on it, typing something. I reached a few more times before giving up. My phone dinged from my empty space on the bed. I picked it up and it read ‘bigbaldhead just posted a video’. I looked at him dirty, if looks could kill. I open my phone to watch the video. I relived the whole altercation I just had with him. 

“You are so annoying” I grumble “ya know, like, Jimmy Fallon and Conan are gonna see this shit and then I’m an interview they’ll ask about it. Along with all the other ones!” 

“It’ll be fine. We’re fine, babe. Calm down. You’re overthinking” I cross my arms and sit up. 

“I love you” he whispered into the crook of my neck as he wrapped his arms around me and laid me down facing him.

Norman imagine

In which you complain about Norman always taking candid shots and videos of you and posting them on social media ____________________________________________________________ “Psst” he whispers. I turned around and he had the camera pointed at me, huge grin on his face. “Shit Norman! I have no pants on and I’m cleaning while you sit there on your phone” I yell. “I love you” he says snickering. “I hate you” I tell him with a pout. “That’s not what you were saying last night” a smirk filled his face. I gasped. “That’s more like it” “Norman!” I yell and reach for his phone. I fell on top of him as he held the phone above him. He still worked on it, typing something. I reached a few more times before giving up. My phone dinged from my empty space on the bed. I picked it up and it read ‘bigbaldhead just posted a video’. I looked at him dirty, if looks could kill. I open my phone to watch the video. I relived the whole altercation I just had with him. “You are so annoying” I grumble “ya know, like, Jimmy Fallon and Conan are gonna see this shit and then I’m an interview they’ll ask about it. Along with all the other ones!” “It’ll be fine. We’re fine, babe. Calm down. You’re overthinking” I cross my arms and sit up. “I love you” he whispered into the crook of my neck as he wrapped his arms around me and laid me down facing him.

Originally posted by morcielago

El Salvador, Venezuela, and what "dictatorship" means in Latin America

I want every North American who is posting in the #prayforvenezuela tag to look very carefully at what is happening in El Salvador right now, because it will provide some clues to things you need to know about Venezuela.

El Salvador had a civil war between the right-wing military government (then and now embodied by the ARENA party) and left-wing guerrillas (under the banner of the FMLN) between 1980-1992, more or less. Up until 2009, the Left had never been vested with governmental power in El Salvador, but in the elections of that year the FMLN’s candidate, Mauricio Funes, managed to come out on top.

Now, 5 years later, another election takes place in which it appears that the left-wing FMLN’s candidate, Salvador Sánchez Cerén, has a narrow lead over ARENA’s candidate, Norman Quijano, going into a recount. Here’s where it gets interesting: Quijano, in his speech to supporters after preliminary votes are released, denounces the count as fraud and accuses the electoral council of bowing down to the “dictatorship.” You read that correctly. The government of Mauricio Funes, who is exiting office at the end of his scheduled term, and who is the first left-wing president ever in the history of El Salvador, presides over a dictatorship.

Wait a minute… where have we heard this logic before?

Oh, that’s right… Venezuela. The same Venezuela that has had 19 elections in 15 years. The same Venezuela with an impeccable electoral system that has been vetted by various international observers. The same Venezuela in which the opposition has had 4 attempts in the last year and a half to defeat the government at the ballot box… that Venezuela is a dictatorship. The same Venezuela with a ministry dedicated to decentralizing political power into neighborhood councils and democratic communes, the same Venezuela that has overseen drastic reductions in poverty and misery, and drastic increases in access to education, health, and employment… that Venezuela is a dictatorship.

There’s a reason we see this logic crop up again and again in Latin America; these are not the only two examples. The reason is that, for right-wing parties (like the party behind Venezuela’s riots) and the elites they represent, a system is not defined as dictatorial based on whether or not there is popular participation, elections, pluralism, civilian oversight, equality, justice, etc. No.

For these elites, a system is defined as dictatorial whenever the chief priority of the governing party is not to defend the privileges of the rich. This whole idea of Venezuela being a dictatorship is not new: the Venezuelan elites have been making that argument since the day Chávez was first elected in 1998, and have continued to refer to it as such after each of the electoral processes in which they have chosen to participate.

But Venezuela has never been a dictatorship due to lack of elections, participation, oversight, equality, or justice; Venezuela is, and has been for 15 years, a dictatorship to the elites because the idea of the poor, humble, usually-darker peoples of Latin America holding political power over their heads doesn’t just scare them: it disgusts them. To those accustomed to centuries of power and prestige, being stripped of these is the worst kind of tyranny imaginable.