non-discrimination

vox.com
A federal court just made a very big decision for gay rights. Seriously, it’s huge.
It’s the first federal appeals court decision to rule that anti-gay discrimination is banned under existing federal law.
By German Lopez

The ruling concludes that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 also protects workers from discrimination based on sexual orientation.

When the courts recognize your basic rights…

Originally posted by eatwithme75

I wish abled people put the same amount of effort and enthusiasm into making sure we have equal access to everything as they put into trying to “cure” us.

They have fundraisers and marathons to raise money for research for finding cures the conditions that may take decades or may never be successfully cured, but not a single activity to fight for accommodations or non-discrimination or accessibility, things that could become realities in a matter of months if the effort was made.

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These are the safest cities to be LGBTQ in America

The HRC’s 2016 Municipal Equality Index ranked 506 cities across the country on criteria which included whether or not they have non-discrimination laws, the inclusiveness of city services and city law enforcement, including the reporting of hate crimes.

Of the 506 cities evaluated, 60 scored a perfect 100 on the HRC’s index — including some cities that were passing laws to protect LGBTQ communities even as their state legislators worked to enact anti-LGBTQ legislation.

Here are the 60 cities and municipalities, listed by state, offering LGBTQ people the most legal protections and inclusion, according to the HRC’s 2016 rankings:

  • Arizona: Phoenix, Tempe, Tuscon
  • California: Cathedral City, Guerneville (Sonoma County), Long Beach, Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, West Hollywood
  • Connecticut: Stamford
  • Florida: Orlando, St. Petersburg, Wilton Manors
  • Georgia: Atlanta
  • Illinois: Chicago
  • Indiana: Bloomington
  • Iowa: Ceder Rapids, Davenport, Iowa City
  • Kentucky: Louisville  
  • Maryland: Baltimore
  • Massachusetts: Boston, Cambridge, Provincetown, Salem, Worcester
  • Michigan: Ann Arbor, Detroit, East Lansing
  • Minnesota: Minneapolis, Saint Paul
  • Missouri: Kansas City, St. Louis
  • Montana: Missoula
  • Nevada: Enterprise, Las Vegas, Paradise
  • New Jersey: Jersey City
  • New York: Albany, New York, Rochester, Yonkers
  • Ohio: Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton
  • Oregon: Portland
  • Pennsylvania: Philadelphia
  • Rhode Island: Providence
  • Texas: Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth
  • Washington: Bellevue, Olympia, Seattle
  • Wisconsin: Madison

Read more (2/15/17 4:45 PM)

15 Trans People who Have Made History

I feel it is extremely important to know about the people in our community who came before us. Throughout history trans people have made history by acting as activists, advocates, and just by being themselves in a world at that against them. This list is by no means complete but the point is to highlight some of the trans people who have made history for our community. 

1) Frances Thompson: Frances was most likely the first trans person to testify before a congressional committee in the US. In 1866 she was a victim of the Memphis Riot. The riot occurred when a group of white men went into a neighbourhood where former slaves, such as Frances, lived. They burned buildings and attacked the former slaves. It was on this matter that she testified before the committee. Ten years later she was arrested for “transvestism.”

2) Lucy Hicks Anderson: Lucy was born in 1886 and began living as a woman a young age. She was first married in 1929 and then attempted to get married again in 1944.However, in 1944 her marriage was denied and she was accused of perjury for saying that she was a woman. After then she became one of the first fighters for marriage equality in America.

3) Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson: Marsha is most known for being one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riot in 1969 however her involvement in the LGBT community stretches beyond that. She was the co-founder of S.T.A.R. which provided support and resources for homeless trans youth. She was also heavily involved in the Gay Liberation Front. She fought for LGBT rights and for people living with HIV and AIDS. She supported the community until her life was cut short in 1992 under suspicious circumstances.

4) Sylvia Rivera: Sylvia was also one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riots. At only seventeen years old she co-founded S.T.A.R. She was also a founder of the Gay Liberation Front. She spent a lot of time advocating for trans people, drag queens, and other people who were not included in the mainstream gay rights movement including fighting against the exclusion of transgender people from the Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act in New York. She was an advocate for the community until her death in 2002.

5) Miss Major Griffin-Gracy: Miss Major was another leader at the Stonewall Riots in 1969 and the community in New York at the time. In the late 1970s she moved to San Diego and started grassroots movements such as working with a food bank to serve trans women who were incarcerated, struggling with addiction, or were homeless. During the AIDS epidemic she provided people with healthcare and organized funerals often one or more a week.  In 1990 she moved to the San Francisco area where she worked with many HIV/AIDs organizations. In 2003 she began working at the Transgender GenderVariant Intersex Justice Project where she works to help transgender women who have been imprisoned. She continues to work as an activist to this day.

6) Hiromasa Ando: Hiromasa was a professional speedboat racer in Japan and publically transitioned when he was given permission to start competing as a male in 2002 becoming the first openly trans person in the sport. He also is one of the first openly trans athletes in the world. 

7) Aya Kamikawa: In 2003 Aya made history when she became the first openly transgender person to be elected into office in Japan. She has also worked for the LGBT community both as a politician and before as a committee member for Trans-Net Japan.

8) Trudie Jackson: Trudie Jackson is a long-time activist for the LGBT and Native American Communities. She has worked with the ASU Rainbow Coalition, the Native American Student Organization, The National LGBTQ Task Force, and the Southwest American Indian Rainbow Gathering. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Equality Arizona Skip Schrader Spirit of Activism Award, one of the 2013 Trans 100, and Echo Magazine’s 2013 Woman of the Year. She is a huge advocate for the Native American trans community.

9) Kim Coco Iwamoto: When elected to the Hawaiian Board of Education in 2006 she held the highest office of any openly trans person in America. She served two terms on the Board of Education and is now a commissioner on the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission.

10) Diego Sanchez: Sanchez was the first openly trans person to hold a senior congressional staff position on Capitol Hill in America when he was appointed by Barney Frank in 2008.

11) Kylar Broadas: Broadas is an attorney, professor, and the first openly trans person to testify in front of the U.S. Supreme Court when he spoke in support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act in 2012. In 2010 he founded the Trans People of Color Coalition.

12) Isis King: She became the first openly trans person to be on America’s Next Top Model in 2008. Her openess and involvement in the show and involvement in the show attracted a lot of both negative and positive attention. She has continued to work as a model, role-model, and advocate for transgender people. 

13) Blake Brockington: Blake first made headlines when he became the first openly transgender high school homecoming king in North Carolina. He was also an activist for the LGBT community, transgender youth and fought against police brutality. Sadly, Brockington lost his life at the age of 18 in 2015 after committing suicide.

14) Diane Marie Rodriguez Zambrano: She has been a human rights and LGBT rights activist in Ecuador for many years. In 2009 she sued the Civil Registry to change her name and set precedent for other trans people to be able to change their names. In 2013 she became the first openly trans person, or LGBT person, in Ecuador to run for office.

15) Ruby Corado: She is an activist born in El Salvador but living in America. She was involved in the Coalition to Clarify the D.C. Human Rights Act which was changed the act to include gender identity and expression. In 2012 she opened Casa Ruby which is the only bilingual and multicultural LGBT organization in Washington, D.C. She has been working for human rights for over 20 years.

Rainfall

‘The Buddha compares his teaching to the rainfall that descends without discrimination on the earth. That this rain causes some seeds to grow into flowers and some into great trees implies no difference in the rain but rather is due to the capacities of the seeds that it nurtures. Thus, the teaching of the Buddha is of a single flavor but benefits beings in a variety of ways according to their capacity.’

- Donald S. Lopez, Jr., Buddhism in Practice.

Luke Skywalker (the lgbt community) initiates a plan to rescue Han Solo (socialism) from the crime lord Jabba the Hutt (capitalism) with the help of Princess Leia (the feminist movement) and Lando Calrissian (the black community). After Luke (the lgbt community) survives his battle with Jabba’s Rancor (congressional opposition to the Employment Non-Discrimination Act), Jabba (capitalism) sentences him and Han (socialism) to death by taking them to the great pit of Carkoon (the senate), where Luke (the lgbt community) frees himself and battles Jabba’s guards (the republican party). During the chaos, Boba Fett (the increasingly disestablished evangelical christian middle class) attempts to attack Luke (the lgbt community), but falls into the Sarlacc pit (the subprime mortgage crisis)

Anti Latinx Racism Is...

• Assuming all Latinxs are from the same/said country

• Assuming all Latinxs know Spanish

• Assuming all Latinxs should know Spanish

• Thinking issues Latinxs face are secondary to issues other marginalized groups face.

• Telling us to go back “where we came from”

• Thinking a Latinx is only respectable if they have a “high profile career” such as being a doctor, lawyer, etc

• Thinking all Latinxs look the same- we come in many different colors from all around the world

• Telling us we have to assimilate

• Trying to speak Spanish to us, thinking we all know it

• Thinking we all listen to Spanish speaking artists

• Blending in our cultures together. Latinxs come from many different cultures and all of them are unique and respectable

• Asking us to cook for you / assuming all we eat is Chipotle and Taco Bell shit

• Saying we’re “the best in bed” or “the best cooks” - that is FETISHIZATION. We will not appreciate or tolerate it.

• Calling us “spicy”, “caliente”, “fuego”, “mami” or whatever dumbass word you can think of. That is also fetishization.

• Making jokes about Trump’s dumb fucking wall

• Thinking Black Latinxs are less valid than non Black Latinxs. That’s also anti black racism which is also disgusting.

• Telling us we are not “Latinx enough” because of our skin color / ability to speak Spanish

• Thinking we all dance salsa, bachata, merengue… like seriously?

• Thinking all Latinxs know each other. No, I don’t know “Maria” from your job.

• Thinking only white people can be prejudiced against us

• Eating our food, listening to our music, using our fashion but blatantly disrespecting Latinxs. This one is pretty obvious and very common.

• Prioritizing documented Latinxs over undocumented Latinxs

• Thinking we all are teen parents. That’s ignorant and guess what? We’re not. Even if a Latinx is/was a teen parent, they’re still deserving of the utmost respect.

• Thinking every Latinx is “illegal”

• Thinking Latinxs owe you shit

• Calling us stereotypical names such as “Maria”, “Juan”, “Rosa”, “Diego”, “Jorge”, “Juanita”, “Alejandro”.. etc.. we have any name and our names, whether Spanish or not, are not for you to joke about. Shut the fuck up and go along with Richard Spencer and be a trash bag far away from us.

• Thinking we need to have a last name that is Spanish

• Derailing us when we try to talk about the issues we face. BIG ONE. Shut the hell up and listen to us for fucking once.

• Thinking we’re all criminals.. honest to god…

• Disrespecting Cinco De Mayo, Dia De Los Muertos, or any other Latinx holiday. If it’s not from your culture, either respect it or shut the fuck up.

• Disrespecting our culture.. duh!

• Calling us “Spanish”.. guess what, you dumb fuck? Spanish people are FROM SPAIN. Spanish people are also not Latinx. It’s not that hard. That’s like saying all white people are German or all Asian people are Chinese. That’s so fucking stupid. You are an idiot if you do this.

• “You don’t look Spanish / Latinx”

• Again, telling us the issues we face are secondary / invalid

• Using Latinx slurs.. if this wasn’t obvious..

• Calling us all “chola” or whatever.. you’re also very ignorant if you do this

• Telling us to calm down if we get angry.. we have a right to be angry just like everyone else on this damn planet

• Assuming we listen to a Spanish speaking music artist… like… ???

• Refusing to recognize the racism Latinxs face

• Thinking we should be glad to be fetishized. No fucking way, I will not be glad someone sees me as less than human and equates me basically to a sex toy.

• Thinking we haven’t face any problems.. we do. We do. Oh hell we do. Just because they’re not addressed in the media does not mean we don’t.

• Making jokes about calling immigration on us. It’s funny how I’ve seen Non Latinx POC do this more than white people.

• Thinking all Latinxs come from Spanish speaking countries… no…

• Thinking we’re all maids, janitors, fast food workers, nannies, etc… first of all, those are honorable jobs. Secondly, so fucking what if we were? You’re not better than people with those occupations. Thirdly, we have so many occupations- each and every one of them deserving of respect.

• Thinking we have to chose between our culture and westernized culture. We don’t.

• Saying stupid shit like “hot like Mexico”.. really? Are you serious?

• Only respecting Latinxs that look a certain way

• Making Anti Latinx jokes.. this is obvious

• Thinking you can appropriate our language and culture. There’s Spanish from Spain and then there’s Latinx slang. You cannot use our slang and then disrespect us which you all do tbh.

Other Latinxs feel free to add in because I obviously missed so much.

Since it aired, I’ve felt uncomfortable with Harry’s statements about equality in the Quotidien interview and the resulting posts/articles about it, but I needed to step back and figure out WHY it made me feel that way.  There was something about his language that immediately rubbed me the wrong way and to see how his statements have been used as some kind of great moment of activism has only added to my discomfort.

As a human rights worker, I spend every day trying to raise awareness and understanding of rights, to ensure that they are implemented properly in my country, and to establish effective forms of redress when there are rights violations.  At the core of my value base is a belief in social justice, equality and non-discrimination, human dignity and human rights.  In my ideal world, these would be fundamental truths for all people, but I recognise that, despite living in a relatively wealthy, developed nation, these are simply not realities for a large section of the population.  The children and families I work with are facing poverty, mental health issues, family breakdown, discrimination, immigration difficulties, violence, trauma and neglect.  For them, the idea of equality is directly connected to politics.  The decisions made at local and national levels impact directly on their day-to-day experiences and their ability to ensure that their basic needs are met.

By stating that equality is something removed from politics, Harry demonstrated his privilege.  As a wealthy and influential white man, he has privilege that allows him to remove himself from the political discourse of inequality and discrimination that define the lives of many others.  That is not to say that Harry has not faced issues like those I mentioned above, but he has resources and connections that others can only dream of so that he doesn’t need to make his ‘fundamental’ beliefs about politics.  

To me, his statement was not inspirational or demonstrative of a greater passion for and awareness of the issues that are impacting on our society today.  It came across as a vague, ill-informed platitude, and when it is being used to generate headlines, it demonstrates just how low the bar is set for him.  Celebrities often use their status as a platform to raise awareness of causes or issues that are important to them.  They are able to speak in specifics, demonstrating a deeper, more nuanced understanding of the topic.  This is not what happened at Quotidien.  In between a series of ‘ums’ and ‘I don’t knows’, Harry cobbled together a sentence to avoid a question he wasn’t comfortable answering. 

This was not an example of activism.  It was an example of not being aware of one’s own privilege.  I would call out my friends and colleagues for making similar vague, ignorant statements, so I won’t hesitate to do so when a celebrity does it, especially when the fandom is holding it up as something to be applauded.  I felt Harry’s statement was dismissive of the reality of people’s lived experience.  Equality is directly connected to politics (and Politics).  Ignoring that only makes the issues we face more difficult to overcome.

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48% of Republicans say there is a lot of discrimination against Christians 

  • A new survey from independent research organization Public Religion Research Institute has shed some light on Americans’ attitudes toward LGBTQ people, especially whether transgender people should be able to access the restroom that matches their transgender identity.
  • According to the survey, the 53% of Americans oppose laws that ban transgender people from using the bathroom that matches their gender identity. However, broken down by political party, Democrats oppose such bills 65-30 while Republicans favor them 59-36. 
  • Though Republicans favor limiting transgender access to gender-appropriate restrooms, they do favor LGBTQ non-discrimination ordinances, which are heavily favored across the board. 
  • According to the survey, 60% of Republicans and 70% of all Americans favor laws protecting LGBTQ people. 
  • 48% of people who identify as Republicans believe that Christians face a lot of discrimination. More Republicans reported widespread discrimination against Christians than against black Americans, lesbians, gays, immigrants and Muslims. Forty-eight percent of Republicans believed transgender people face a lot of discrimination. Read more (3/10/17 5:12 PM)

CONFESSION: 

As a Christian, I find myself disliking Andrastianism because I find it incompatible with biblical Christianity. The Maker is presented as no better than the Evanuris, demanding absolute obedience among followers while doing whatever He wants no matter how immoral they are. Non-humans are discriminated against, which contradicts its goal of spreading the faith to all races. Lastly, the Chantry uses military force to enforce the faith on everyone, which is unsurprisingly counter-productive, as it has made more bitter enemies in the long run.

yahoo.com
As Trump prepares order on religious liberty, Pence’s credibility with evangelicals is at stake
Sources say a struggle over the language of President Trump's upcoming order on religious liberty pits a Pence faction against a moderate faction led by Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner.

Ok so the gist here is that Trump planned an order to exempt religious organizations etc from non-discrimination rules about same-sex marriage, abortion, etc., and it was leaked. Right-wing politicians are saying that the leak was planned by “President Jared” and Ivanka Trump, who they see as being more LGBT-friendly, so that the order would be changed.

Read between the lines. This is subtle but chilling, please do not miss it.

Christian fundamentalists are fear-mongering about a Jewish conspiracy in the White House to attack right-wing evangelical values and what they term religious liberty, and they’re doing it at the expense of LGBT rights. 

Donald Trump is now president — here are 8 guides to help you resist his agenda

Indivisible

Written by a group of progressive former congressional staffers, this guide takes the majority of its wisdom from an unlikely source: the Tea Party. “We saw these activists take on a popular president with a mandate for change and a supermajority in Congress,” the former staffers wrote about the Tea Party’s challenge to President Obama starting in 2009, shortly after he took office. “Their ideas were wrong, cruel and tinged with racism — and they won.”

So, taking a page from the Tea Party’s playbook, Indivisible offers practical dos and don'ts for people who want to challenge their elected officials. It urges activists to start and focus their efforts locally, because constituents are the people to whom every elected official is responsible.

Resistance Manual

This is a guide that was put together by Stay Woke — a branch of We, the Protesters, a group led by popular online activists DeRay McKesson and Netta Elzie. It’s a working document that lays out essential readings, issue areas and resources.

“The manual will grow over time as more and more people contribute updates, facts and resources to it,” McKesson wrote in an email announcing the manual’s release. “As such, we encourage you to contribute important information for others to read.”

Know Your Rights: Demonstrations and Protests

The right to peaceful assembly is a universal promise, but certainly not a guarantee. It’s a safe bet to expect civil disobedience to increase during Trump’s presidency. Big and small protests have already been happening in cities across the country, and those demonstrations are likely to get bigger and louder as Trump’s agenda unfolds in earnest. But the specifics of those protests are often hard to gauge. This guide, provided by the American Civil Liberties Union, helps with the nuts and bolts, such as how to secure permits, what restrictions need to be followed on private property and whether protesters have the right to take photos or videos during demonstrations.

Know Your Rights: What to Do if You’re Stopped by Police

Trump has promised to bring back law and order to America’s cities. But for many marginalized communities, that type of speech is just code for allowing law enforcement to wantonly stop, search and possibly arrest black and brown people — concerns for which there’s been plenty of precedent.

This is another guide from the ACLU. This one spells out what you have the right to ask and show police. Note that it’s never a certainty that those rights will be respected by a law enforcement officer during a confrontation, but this guide outlines your rights so you can at least know which of those rights are being violated and what violations to report later on.

Know Your Rights: Transgender People at Work

Trump has repeatedly vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which could have dire consequences for millions of Americans. But transgender communities already felt the brunt of those consequences in December, when a federal judge in Texas halted protections for transgender Americans in Obamacare shortly before they were set to go into effect.

While that’s one tangible effect of a Trump presidency fundamentally altering what’s possible for transgender communities, another will be limiting — or even drawing back — federal protections in housing and employment. Sen. Jeff Sessions, Trump’s pick for attorney general, has a history of anti-LGBTQ sentiment, including his refusal to sign a voluntary nondiscrimination pledge. He also voted against the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would offer federal protection against gender identity discrimination in the workplace. This guide, again from the ACLU, offers general overviews of what employers can and can’t do as it relates to employees’ gender identity.

Digital Security Tips for Protesters

Smartphones have become an indispensable tool for protesters, whether it’s used to document police violence or simply challenge the mainstream media’s narrative of what’s happening on the ground. But technology also leaves protesters vulnerable to government surveillance. The Electronic Frontier Foundation is a nonprofit that focuses on civil liberties and technology, and its guide on digital security for protesters is a must-read. From how to send secure messages to friends to instructions for backing up your data and installing apps with strong encryption software, this guide has what protesters will need to make their voices heard.

How to apply for deferred action in the Trump era

It’s unclear what, exactly, will become of the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the immigration program he enacted by executive order that helped hundreds of thousands of immigrant young people gain temporary relief from deportation.

Neither Sessions nor Trump’s nominee for secretary of Homeland Security, Gen. John Kelly, would say one way or another in their confirmation hearings that participants in the program would not be targeted by immigration officials. And Trump himself vowed to end the program while he was running for office. But, as of now, the program still exists, and is one of the only forms of protection for immigrant youths. The National Immigration Law Center updated their tips on how to apply shortly after Trump was elected.

“Over 700,000 people so far have opted to apply for and received DACA, and many of them have found better paying jobs, gotten driver’s licenses, and enjoyed other positive benefits,” the group says on its website. “Again, whether to apply for DACA is a personal choice, but here are some of NILC’s post-election recommendations.”

Tips for reporting incidents of Islamophobia

It’s no surprise, given the “build-the-wall-ban-the-Muslims” rhetoric that permeated Trump’s campaign, that hate crimes ticked upward after his election. The Council on American-Islamic Relations has a bunch of resources for people who want to report bias incidents, and also makes it easy to report those incidents so that CAIR can keep count of them.

read more | follow @the-movemnt

Honestly some of you guys deserve medals for sticking around all this time. 

It’s been such a long journey. 

And I’m not even half way through it. 

But hopefully the CENSORED will be worth it!

Shadowrun Missions does not condone or accept any forms of real life racism, sexism, bullying, harassment, or abuse for, by, and/or of it’s players or GMs. We want to accept and welcome anyone and everyone to our Missions game tables, but the one type of person we will not welcome is anyone who feels the need to bully someone else because they’re a woman, or gay, or transgender, or for any other reason.

For our players, if you ever feel threatened in the slightest at one of our tables, tell your Missions GM immediately, or talk to another Agent if there is one on site. Or contact either the CDT Agent Coordinator (sinthalix@yahoo.com) or myself (SRMissions@gmail.com) if you don’t feel comfortable talking with the agent on site.

This is a matter we take very seriously, and is something that cannot and will not stand at Shadowrun Missions games. We want every player to feel welcome and safe so that they can have fun.

—  Shadowrun Missions non-discrimination statement. August 28, 2014.

Challenge: Find me one precedential case involving closeting in an entertainment context under the UK Equality Act. Absent that, find any reference in the legislative history to indicate the Act was intended to cover such activity. Absent that, identify how the UK Equality Act substantively differs from other non-discrimination acts in other jurisdictions such that the illegality of closeting in the entertainment context is a colorable claim.

And if you don’t know what any of those words mean, you don’t have the authority to say what the UK Equality Act does or does not cover.

anonymous asked:

I understand how european bloggers are frustrated with americans and us centrism but isn't saying that "racism in europe is different than the usa" ignoring the similarities? for example italians face discrimination in europe, italians faced discrimination in the usa, black people face discriminiation in usa and in europe, also middle eastern people face discrimination is europe and the usa. Like romani people face discrimination in the usa as well. like there are large similarities.

Hi anon.

Okay, when Europeans say that racism works differently in Europe, they aren’t saying that racism against black people, middle eastern people or romani people don’t exist and we are not ignoring those similarities - literally no sane European will ever try to argue that, and I certainly will be the last to do so, I have never done that in any of my posts about this issue, I am never going to start and I follow no Europeans who do.

Where Europeans get frustrated is when you have US bloggers insisting that their definition of racism (which is mostly about colourism and comes from their history) can be applied everywhere the same. When Americans insist that you cannot be racist against white people because racism is power plus prejudice (or whatever have you) and white people are always in power and therefore cannot be discriminated against.. well this is where you lose Europeans. Because “whiteness” in Europe simply does not operate the same way; to put it in simple words, insisting that white people always held power and were never oppressed erases a huge part of European history, erases the sufferings of many people/countries and of course we aren’t okay with that - nobody would.

I have mentioned the Polish being denied the right to exist many times as well as the Greek’s genocide at the hands of the Turks. I could also mention the Albanian massacres, the oppression of the Irish by the British, the prejudices against Slavic people or the many invasion of Finland by Russia, and those are only examples. Racism in Europe simply isn’t only about colour, it’s also about ethnicity (and classism, really), many people who would be seen as simply “white” in the US, would not in Europe and would face and have faced many discriminations for being the “wrong kind of white” so to speak.

No one in Europe will deny that black people.. etc… will face racism here, but we are uncomfortable with the way Americans will keep pushing on us the idea that white people have always held power and that therefore you cannot be prejudiced against them, simply because Europe’s history do not go in that sense and we witness racism between many European ethnicities all the time. We have a problem with Americans trying to push their constructs and definition of what racism is on us - a definition that comes from their particular history of slavery and segregation - and insist that if we disagree then it must be because we’re racist ourselves.

In Europe you can be racist against white people (including non white people against white people btw - looking at Turkey again), and this is where we are frustrated with Americans trying to force their definition of racism as solely being about white people discriminating against non-white, and with the way they are ignoring that power is fluid and will be held by different people depending of where and when you are. Europe’s different history and social background will mean that those issues will have different dynamics attached to them and won’t operate or be dealt with the same and we wish this was acknowledged instead of dismissed just to try to make us fit in their neat little American centred “social justice” bow.

youtube

Must Watch: New Video Highlights Pence Dodging Questions About Indiana’s New Law and LGBT Equality

Following Indiana Governor Mike Pence’s brutal interview this morning on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, HRC released its own new video that highlights the eight different times that he ducked, dodged, and declined to answer simple, straightforward questions about Indiana’s new law and whether discrimination against LGBT Hoosiers should be illegal.
How to make slaves to the state in the name of “diversity”

You’ve heard it all by now. Bakers are being forced to bake cakes for gay weddings, photographers are being forced to participate in gay weddings, chapels are being forced to officiate gay weddings, etc. And it’s all being done in the name of “equality.” Liberty, of course, is never mentioned.

This is not a religious issue, it’s a liberty issue.

There are those who would make this a religious issue but I believe that it is both short-sighted and unprincipled to do so. Yes, it’s true that most of the cases that we’ve had thus far have involved religion and religious objection, but it is certainly possible to have a case that doesn’t involve religion. Laws that exclusively exempt religious people from following laws that others must follow, do nothing but give religious people special privileges. This is both unconstitutional and inconsistent. There are any number of reasons that a proprietor might refuse service to a customer – and they don’t all involve religion.

But because we have made it about religion, we now have a false argument that has created a division between religious people and non-religious people. This doesn’t have to be the case. After all, at the heart of all of this, it’s not about religion, it’s about liberty. If we would all stay principled, we can avoid problems like this in the future.

Many have a fundamental misunderstanding of what a right is.

There are those who would say that customers have a right to buy something. And this is absolutely true! But here’s the distinction: They don’t have the right to force someone to sell them something. Gay people, straight people, religious people, non-religious people, rich people, poor people and any other group of people have the right, in the United States of America, to purchase a cake. They don’t, however, have the right to force someone to bake them a cake. This should be obvious.

Forcing people to work against their will is slavery.

There is no other way to describe it. The reason they might not want to do the work is utterly irrelevant. If a baker is forced to bake a cake, or a photographer is forced to take pictures, or a plumber is forced to unclog a drain or a farmer is forced to harvest his crops or if any other person is forced to perform labor against his will, it is slavery plain and simple. You can pretend that it isn’t. You can try to justify it by using words like “equality” or “fairness.” You can even demonize the opposition with ad hominem attacks and demagoguery. But the fact will remain, forcing people to work against their will is slavery. And it’s immoral.

Business owners have first amendment rights too.

The typical response to this is always something to the effect of: “if you advertise a service or product, you must be able to provide it with no exceptions.” But this is ludicrous on it’s face. A person does not give up his first amendment rights just because he started a business. Advertising for a business is not the same thing as entering into a contract. I see Lexus ads all the time but I can guarantee you that the Lexus dealership will not give me a Lexus for the amount of money in my bank account. I am ineligible to purchase a Lexus. I am not a potential customer even though they advertised to me as if I was one. “Yeah! But not having enough money is different!” Why is it different? If you have no *principled* response as to why it’s different, then you have no good argument. Furthermore, as I’ve already stated, a business owner might have any number of reasons to refuse service to a potential customer: Lack of money, unruly behavior, difficult delivery logistics, lack of customer license, product or service disputes, age, appearance, etc. It would be a ridiculous fool’s errand to try to determine which of these things should be “illegal” and which shouldn’t be.

We must remain consistent.

A potential response to the above argument is to suggest that all of the other reasons listed for refusing service directly affect the bottom line of the business and, therefore, should be permitted. But, again, not only is this not true, there are plenty of examples that parallel quite nicely with the current controversy. For example, should the gay owner of a community meeting facility be forced to rent it out to, say, The Westboro cult? Obviously not. Should a Christian web developer be forced by the government to design a pornographic website? The vast majority of people would rightly say “no” (remember, this is an analogy, not a comparison). But if they are to remain consistent, those who use the old “If you advertise, there must be no exceptions” argument, must argue that a developer should be forced to design a pornographic web site. These hypothetical scenarios and the current controversy all involve a refusal of service based on (dare I use the phrase) conscientious objection. These businesses should reserve the right to refuse service if they so choose.

Who gets to decide what kind of objection is acceptable?

Whenever analogies like the one above are used, the response often meanders around to the notion that only certain types of objection should be allowed or that we should have certain “protected classes.” In other words, we should define when a business can refuse service and when it can’t. But is that really what we want? Do we really want an all-powerful government determining the things that are acceptable and things that aren’t? Who wins? The people with the most lobbyists? The largest special interest group? Similarly, do we really want the government defining identity groups and then determining which of them should have special rights? Of course not! But that’s exactly what would be (and is) happening.

Free people should be able to enter into contracts with one another.

Rarely have I heard anyone disagree with the notion that people should be able to enter (or not enter) into contracts freely. When a customer purchases something from a business, the two entities have entered into a private contract. The terms of that contract are nobody else’s business. Similarly, the reasons one might choose not to enter into a contract are also nobody else’s business. This is not a hard concept. Yet, for some reason, this principle goes out the window when the feelings of a member of a so-called victim class are on the line.

As usual, liberty is the solution.

You know, I would complain all day if a company didn’t serve me for some petty reason. I would blog about it. I would alert the media. I would protest. I would call for boycotts, etc. But here’s what I would not do: I would not expect (or want) the government to coerce that business into serving me. After all, I’m free to shop somewhere else. I’m free to start my own business and do what I please with it. I’m free to never interact with the business that rejected me. I’m free to live my life as I see fit. And really, that’s the beauty of liberty. All people are free to make their own decisions. No one owns anyone. No one’s identity is defined by bureaucrats. No one is forced to do something they don’t want to do. Yes, within liberty, someone’s feelings might get hurt but that’s life. Yes, within liberty, there will be people who behave badly. But I would take that liberty over an authoritarian government any day.

usatoday.com
North Carolina governor offers ‘compromise’ repealing anti-LGBT law HB2
Democratic governor offers compromise to repeal HB2, hoping to spur Republican support.

Hey, remember HB2 in North Carolina? It’s still not over! 

Gov. Roy Cooper, who campaigned on a promise to repeal the anti-LGBT law, has offered a “compromise” in an attempt to get Republicans more on board with repealing it. It includes striking down HB2, enforcing higher penalties for crimes committed in public bathrooms and dressing rooms (which is what Republicans wrongly claim will happen if trans people are allowed to use public bathrooms), and requiring local governments to tell the state government 30 days before adopting their own non-discrimination ordinances. 

HB2 says people must use the restroom for the sex shown on their birth certificate when in state or local government buildings. Proponents say that decreases the chances of crimes being committed in those places, while opponents say there have been few instances of people using non-discrimination laws as a cover to commit crimes.

Rumors and comments on social media that other local governments in the state would adopt rules preventing discrimination on the basis of sexual preference or sexual orientation once HB2 was off the books helped kill a proposal to repeal HB2 during a special legislative session in December.

HB2 says local government cannot adopt such rules.

Ugh. North Carolina. I can’t believe this is still going on.