non governmental organization

Elizabeth Abimbola Awoliyi  (1910-1971) 

Art by  Φ (tumblr)

Elizabeth Abimbola Awoliyi was the first female physician in Nigeria.  She studied medicine in Dublin, graduating in 1936.  Elizabeth specialized in gynecology and obstetrics. She eventually became Medical Director of the Massey Street Hospital in Lagos and a Senior Specialist for the Nigerian Ministry of Health.  Elizabeth was also president of the National Council of Women Societies, an important non-governmental organization in Nigeria.  

100 Acts of Resistance

The first 100 days of Trump regime is critical and where he has the best chances to push for his agenda in the next four years. In townhalls I’ve attended and questions i see people always ask online is wanting specific directions and what concrete things can we do to resist Trump and GOP.

Below are 100 basic action items you can take to resist the Trump and GOP agenda in his first 100 days and in the next four years. These generic action items can be applied to take action on any current issue or on any specific issue you’ve been passionate about for a long time. 

While it’s encouraged to do as many of these as you can, especially in Trump’s first 100 days, the point of the list is to give you different options on actions you can take that will fit within your time and abilities, and it is by no means exhaustive. The goal is to motivate you to take an action no matter how small, and hopefully provide a jumpstart to take bolder actions in resisting fascism: 

  1. Follow all your representatives on social media, esp on Twitter and Facebook
  2. Save all the numbers of your elected officials on your phone & designate a schedule within your day or week to call them
  3. Visit your elected officials’ website, subscribe to their newsletter/events calendar/follow their bills
  4. Call your Senator #1
  5. Call your Senator #2
  6. Call the Senate Leader (Mitch McConnell)
  7. Call your Congressperson
  8. Call the House Speaker (Paul Ryan)
  9. Call the VP office (Mike Pence)
  10. Call the White House Call Donald Trump Hotels
  11. Call your Governor
  12. Call your Mayor/County Executive
  13. Call your City/County Council Member
  14. Call your State Senator
  15. Call your State Representative
  16. Write* your Senator #1
  17. Write* your Senator #2
  18. Write* your Congressperson
  19. Write* your Governor
  20. Write* your Mayor/County Executive
  21. Write* your City/County Council Member
  22. Write* your State Senator
  23. Write* your State Representative
  24. Write the House Speaker
  25. Write the Senate Leader
  26. Write the VP office
  27. Write the White House
  28. After initial letter or call, follow up with your elected officials
  29. Write letters to editors of local newspapers
  30. Attend a protest in your area
  31. Plan/organize a protest in your area
  32. Attend a townhall (with your representatives)
  33. Attend a city/county council meeting
  34. Attend a legislative hearing
  35. Attend a school board meeting
  36. Attend your rep’s public event
  37. Attend a neighborhood community meeting (esp with law enforcement)
  38. Attend a community event (with community leaders & grassroots orgs)
  39. Participate in a community conference call/grassroots webinar
  40. Plan/Host a community event
  41. Sign a petition
  42. Get at least five other people to sign a petition
  43. Start a petition on a local issue
  44. Invite a friend to participate in a protest
  45. Invite a friend to attend a townhall
  46. Invite a friend to a community event
  47. Invite a friend to community call/grassroots webinar
  48. Get a friend to write a letter to the editor of a local paper
  49. Get at least one friend or family member to call/write their elected official, esp those with GOP reps
  50. Schedule a meeting with one of your elected officials
  51. Read and Share news articles (help spread facts, not propaganda news!)
  52. Follow reputable journalists on social media, esp on Twitter & FB
  53. Follow local, regional and national newspapers on social media
  54. Follow government agencies on social media
  55. Follow activists on social media
  56. Follow civil rights organizations on social media
  57. Subscribe to text alerts and newsletters from civil rights organizations
  58. Participate in an online campaign to spread public awareness or get attention of Congress
  59. Volunteer for local affiliates of nationwide civil rights organizations
  60. Volunteer for local democratic party
  61. Volunteer for a local progressive organization
  62. Volunteer in a political campaign
  63. Volunteer for a local community service project (serve.gov)
  64. Volunteer for a civil rights organization (local & national)
  65. Volunteer for an immigrant and refugee organization (local & international)
  66. Volunteer for an LGBT rights organization (local & national)
  67. Volunteer for reproductive rights organization (local & national)
  68. Volunteer for a healthcare/public health organization (local & national)
  69. Volunteer for an anti-poverty/hunger organization (domestic or international)
  70. Volunteer for an anti-homeless organization (local & national)
  71. Volunteer for an anti-trafficking/anti-slavery organization (domestic & int’l)
  72. Volunteer for an humanitarian organization (domestic or international)
  73. Volunteer for a voting rights organization (local & national)
  74. Volunteer for a veterans organization (local & national)
  75. Volunteer for a disabilities organization (local & national)
  76. Volunteer for a climate change organization (domestic & international)
  77. Volunteer for a non-partisan organization (local or international)
  78. Volunteer for a non-governmental organization of your choosing
  79. Donate to a civil rights organization (local & national)
  80. Donate to an immigrant and refugee organization (local & international)
  81. Donate to an LGBT rights organization (local & national)
  82. Donate to a reproductive rights organization (local & national)
  83. Donate to a healthcare/public health organization (local & national)
  84. Donate to an anti-poverty/hunger organization (domestic or international)
  85. Donate to an anti-homelessness organization (local & national)
  86. Donate to an anti-trafficking/anti-slavery organization (domestic & int’l)
  87. Donate to an humanitarian organization (domestic or international)
  88. Donate to a voting rights organization (local & national)
  89. Donate to a veterans organization (local & national)
  90. Donate to a disabilities organization (local & national)
  91. Donate to a climate change organization (domestic & international)
  92. Donate to a non-partisan organization (local or international)
  93. Donate to a non-governmental organization of your choosing
  94. Donate to a local democratic party
  95. Donate to a political campaign
  96. Register to Vote
  97. Get at least one friend or family member to register to vote
  98. Vote on municipal, state and national elections
  99. Get at least one friend or family member to vote
  100. Run for office

*letters, postcards, fax, email, open letters on newspapers

2

A day you won’t hear about from media or government in the U.S.

June 12th is World Day Against Child Labor.

Today there are at least 168 million working children, half of whom are engaged in harmful and hazardous work.

That’s probably the most vile phenomenon of today’s world, when millions of children, the most helpless and defenseless citizens of the world, are forced to work hard in order not to starve to death or because of forceful coercion (forced labor, essentially slavery). Some theorists believe that child labor is used by many multinational corporations which claim to have a policy of social responsibility, but in countries where their production capacity is actually located, widely use the most severe forms of exploitation, in particular forced and child labor.

Via Vitalina Butkalyuk

In countries where child labor is common (Southeast Asia, several countries in Latin America, Africa, the former Soviet republics of Central Asia), children are often subjected to prostitution, fall into the global trafficking system, and go without access to a decent education and medicine.

According to numerous studies by the United Nations and international non-governmental organizations, in countries where children are forced (by physical and economic coercion) to work, as well as into prostitution and early marriages, girls are increasingly deprived of the opportunity to learn and to get social security and hope for a better future.

Via Aurora

Eclipse Phase: Argonauts

We need science now more than ever, and Posthuman Studios has stepped up to provide it! This 25-page PDF covers the Argonauts. Who are the Argonauts, you ask?

Commonly known as the Argonauts, The Argonaut Council for Responsible Science is a non-governmental organization that advocates socially responsible use of science and technology.

This sourcebook is a product of the Transhuman Kickstater for Eclipse Phase, and will be available on DriveThru RPG later this month (Feb 2017).

3

Crown Princess Victoria and Prince Albert are both currently in New York to attend the Ocean Conference being held by the UN from June 5-9, 2017.  

The following is from the Conference website.

“The Conference aims to be the game changer that will reverse the decline in the health of our ocean for people, planet and prosperity. It will be solutions-focused with engagement from all.

The Conference shall:

  • Identify ways and means to support the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14;
  • Build on existing successful partnerships and stimulate innovative and concrete new partnerships to advance the implementation of Goal 14;
  • Involve all relevant stakeholders, bringing together Governments, the United Nations system, other intergovernmental organizations, international financial institutions, non-governmental organizations, civil society organizations, academic institutions the scientific community, the private sector, philanthropic organizations and other actors to assess challenges and opportunities relating to, as well as actions taken towards, the implementation of Goal 14;
  • Share the experiences gained at the national, regional and international levels in the implementation of Goal 14;
  • Contribute to the follow-up and review process of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development by providing an input to the high-level political forum on sustainable development, in accordance with resolutions 67/290 of 9 July 2013, 70/1 of 25 September 2015 and 70/299 of 29 July 2016, on the implementation of Goal 14, including on opportunities to strengthen progress in the future;

The Conference shall comprise plenary meetings, partnership dialogues and a special event commemorating World Oceans Day.

The Conference shall adopt by consensus a concise, focused, intergovernmentally agreed declaration in the form of a “Call for Action” to support the implementation of Goal 14 and a report containing the co-chairs’ summaries of the partnership dialogues, as well as a list of voluntary commitments for the implementation of Goal 14, to be announced at the Conference.”

I grew up in Baghdad in a middle-class family. My father served in the Iraqi Air Force and often travelled internationally; my mother was a math teacher; my siblings all attended college. I graduated from the most prestigious high school in Baghdad before getting my degree at pharmacy school.

I grew up reading Superman and Batman comics, playing with Lego’s and swimming at the pools of the fancy clubs where my parents were members. I was 12 during the first Gulf War in 1990. And until then, my childhood was uneventful: I was a happy kid.

Until 1990, I never heard a mosque call for prayer. I almost never saw a woman covering her hair with a hijab. My mom wore make-up, skirts, blouses with shoulder pads and Bermuda shorts. She never covered her hair.

Since moving to Los Angeles in 2009, I’ve realized that most Americans don’t understand that Iraq used to be a modern, westernised and secular country. From the 1930’s to the 1980’s, Iraq’s neighbours looked to it as the example. People from different Arab countries came to Iraq to attend university. The country had an excellent education system, great health care, and Iraq was rich — not the richest, but rich.

Of course, Iraq is not like this today.

After Iraq invaded Kuwait, 24 years ago, the United States destroyed most of Iraq’s infrastructure during the Persian Gulf War. Bridges were bombed, along with power stations, rail-roads, dams and oil refineries.

I remember that we would turn on the faucet, and barely any water would come out. It was worse during the summer. To take showers, we had to rely on water tanks on the roof, which supplied extra water to our home. To keep the tanks full, we had to fill containers with dripping water from a hose. Sometimes it would take hours for one container to fill because there was so little water. Then we would have to carry each container up and down the roof in many shifts. To make things worse, the water would come out boiling hot because it had been sitting in the sun. We also had limited electricity — which remains a problem, even 20 years later. Sleeping was difficult. You would wake up, sweating, in the middle of the night. You couldn’t open the windows because of mosquitoes. I would sleep in my underwear on the marble floor because it was cooler.

In 1990, an embargo was imposed, which prohibited Iraq from exporting oil. Iraqis suddenly found themselves poor.

Prices became inflated, and everything cost more. Before the war, you could buy a flat of eggs for two Iraqi dinars. By 2003, when the U.S. invaded Iraq again, those eggs cost several thousand dinars. (My monthly pay check after I graduated from pharmacy school was 50,000 dinars a month.)

People’s values changed after 1990, too. Robberies increased. Houses were even built differently. There used to be low fences separating one house from another. But after the war, people built high fences and covered their windows with bars. Our home was robbed three times over 10 years. If you parked your car by the street — even for just three minutes — you risked your hubcaps being stolen.

Gradually, people also began turning to religion as a result of all the hardships. Religion changed the country: more censorship, more rules, more rigidity. Alcohol, which was once widely accepted, was frowned upon. Mainstream TV shows and movies — even cartoons — were censored to remove kissing scenes, partial nudity and other elements viewed as immoral.

Neither of the United States’ wars changed life in Iraq the way the U.S. government had intended.

I think the United States wanted Iraqis to revolt against Saddam Hussein and depose him. If only it were that easy.

The notion of democracy is foreign to the Arab world. Although the West saw the “Arab Spring” protests as movements for democracy, they were really uprisings against various dictators, which are not the same thing. What we know is that for countless generations, we’ve lived in a hierarchical society. It’s not about individualism or personal freedoms. It’s about following your father, your family and your tribe. There’s no culture of respecting different opinions.

As a college student, I looked to the West in awe of the personal freedoms and human rights that let people follow their dreams. In the U.S., even animals had rights.

But many Iraqis I know don’t see freedom the way Americans do: a political right afforded to everyone who lives in the U.S. I’ve heard crazy comments that equate freedom with loose morals and women having sex without being married.

The very idea of freedom rocks the whole foundation of Iraqi culture. So, when Iraqis were given their freedom, instead of turning to democracy, they, like many others in the region, turned to religion and religious leaders for guidance and political advice.

Shiites voted for Shiite candidates. Sunnis voted for Sunnis. The Shiites came to power because they were the majority.

What’s happening in Iraq today is merely a continuation of the failure of democracy. And a failure of the United States to understand the psyche of Iraqis.

The people who might have been able to change Iraq — the educated, the artists, the moderates — began leaving in 1990, after the embargo was imposed and their comfortable lifestyles came to an end. People with connections fled to friends and family in other countries. Almost all of them left the country illegally.

In 2003, Saddam Hussein fell and the floodgates opened up, with even more people leaving the country for good at a time when they were most needed. Until that year, I was barred from travelling, along with other pharmacists, doctors and certain professionals.

I wanted to leave, but what would I do? Where would I go? Only a handful of countries even allowed travel on an Iraqi passport. My parents and siblings fled to Syria, and later to Jordan. I stayed in Baghdad, where I worked at the International Republican Institute, a non-governmental organization that promotes democracy in post-conflict countries. Later, I got a job as a translator at the Los Angeles Times.

With my friends and family gone, I felt very isolated and alone. It also became unsafe to move around, even to do simple things like go to a restaurant or the market.

In 2009, I managed to come to the U.S. as a refugee, and I was happy to leave Iraq behind. But even though I’d given up on my country, I had hope that things would not get as bad as they have today. It is my worst nightmare that an extremist group like the Islamic State has support in Iraq and, though it pains me to say this, the aftermath of the U.S. invasions has brought us to this point.

After the U.S. toppled Saddam Hussein in 2003, some even dared to dream that the country would become as rich as Gulf States like Kuwait. There was no Iraqi government in place for a long time and, for several months, life in Baghdad was free of bombings and attacks.

To make things worse, the U.S. dissolved the Iraqi army and started a process to remove those politically aligned with Saddam, which ended up taking jobs away from thousands of Sunnis and seemed like an unfair witch hunt. Add to these political actions poverty and a lack of basic services, and you end up with a deep, sectarian divide in Iraq that I believe led to the insurgency and the problems that exist today.

So as I read the news on CNN Arabic and the BBC while pacing around the house, I feel as if I’m experiencing a death in the family. I’m going through the stages of grief: denial, anger, sadness, depression. Lately, I’ve even tried to avoid reading the news at all.

Sometimes, I watch old YouTube videos that show the way Iraq used to be. But the Iraq I loved and was proud of — the country I lived in before 1990 — doesn’t exist any more. And I don’t see that changing in my lifetime

—  Saif Al-Azzawi

Who We Are

We are from Mumbai’s red-light area.

We are daughters of sex workers.

We are girls who were trafficked.

We are survivors.

We are young women with big plans and big dreams.

We are leaders.

We are agents of change.

Kranti means “Revolution” in Hindi – and we are the Revolutionaries!

What We Do

Kranti is a non-governmental organization (NGO) that empowers girls from Mumbai’s red-light areas to become agents of social change. Kranti believes that, when girls like us have access to the same education, training, and opportunities as people from privileged backgrounds, we can become exceptional leaders.

Our backgrounds give us added value as leaders and agents of social change because we’ve had to develop innovativeness, compassion, and resilience in the face of marginalization and discrimination. By combining our experiences with the support, opportunities, and confidence Kranti gives us, we can revolutionize not only our own lives, but also our community, the people around us, and all of India. Look out world – here come the Revolutionaries!

How We Get There

Therapy: Because change starts from within
At Kranti, we believe that the first and most important step of becoming a social change agent is learning to love oneself. All of the Revolutionaries have faced abuse, rape, and other types of violence, as well as the emotional and mental burden of coming from India’s most marginalized populations. To help us overcome society’s prejudice toward us, our mothers, and our community, Kranti offers many kinds of therapy, including art therapy, dance movement therapy, and cognitive based therapy.

Education: Because changing the world requires critical thinking as well as literacy
At Kranti, we believe the purpose of education is not to attain employment; it is to achieve empowerment and social change. We study in mainstream schools and open schools, and attend trainings with partner NGOs, including Swaraj, PWESCR, CREA, and Pravah. We are also free to design our own curriculum and measure our own progress.

Extracurricular: Because social change is led by well-rounded human beings
Each Revolutionary is required to take two extracurricular activities: one physical and one artistic. We’re learning everything from photography, drawing, singing, piano, and drums to karate and dance!

Social Justice: Because social change must be taught and learned
The Social Justice Curriculum covers 20 topics including caste, class, religion, environment, gender, sexuality, and women’s rights. Through a combination of workshops, documentaries, theatre, guest speakers, and field trips, we learn about the root causes of India’s biggest social justice problems, what the situation is today, and how we can help solve the problem. We even get to design and implement our own projects for each social justice unit.

Workshops and Theater: Because changing the world requires practice
We have led dozens of interactive workshops across India for over 15,000 people at schools, companies and NGOs; topics range from trafficking and sex work to gender equality and sexual abuse. We have also written a play about their lives, which we have performed in over 50 venues in India. By telling our stories, we’ve changed audiences’ mindsets about us, our moms, and our community.

Travel: Because you can’t change the world without seeing it first
Kranti takes between 3 and 5 trips each year, including an annual Himalayan trek in India, Nepal, or Bhutan. Traveling provides the opportunity to learn from various NGOs and to lead workshops around the country, as well as develop the confidence, grit, and resilience that can only come from traveling.

December 18, 2016

International Migrants Day is an international day observed on 18 December as International Migrants Day appointed by the General Assembly of United Nations on 4 December 2000 taking into account the large and increasing number of migrants in the world. 

This day is observed in many countries, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations through the dissemination of information on human rights and fundamental political freedoms of migrants, and through sharing of experiences and the design of actions to ensure the protection of migrants.

anonymous asked:

Ok so what did trump sign? Some people say it's an anti abortion bill and others are saying it's just a thing where people have to pay for abortions

“President Donald Trump signed an executive action on Monday reinstating the so-called Mexico City Policy, which bars international non-governmental organizations that perform or promote abortions from receiving US government funding.”

Here’s a biased cnn article-
http://edition.cnn.com/2017/01/23/politics/trump-mexico-city-policy/

Essentially the US taxpayers won’t be paying hundreds of millions of dollars towards foreign women’s family planning, birth control and abortions. I’m trying to understand why that was our responsibility in the first place, but I’m sure that’s just because I’m a evil patriarch.

“The United States spends about $600 million a year on international assistance for family planning and reproductive health programs, making it possible for 27 million women and couples to access contraceptive services and supplies.”

Another totally fair and balanced article from the Huffington post-
http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5886369be4b0e3a7356a7910

The good news is I’m sure that all of the people who are so pissed of about this can find a charity to donate to if they want to help women in 3rd world countries. I know it’s super xenophobic to say this but I personally don’t mind that more US tax payer money can be spent in the US. Crazy thought, I know.

A.G.R.A., graffitis, Polish trade unions and Thatcher

Anyone else notice this graffity? We know graffitis always hold some stong meaning or clue on this show. This particular one is seen when Mary is touring Europe while on the run. 

I don’t know exactly in which country Mary is at that time but going by the graffiti and it’s meaning it’s most likely Poland. In the 1980′s a non governmental trade union named ‘Solidanosc’ (engl. Solidarity) was brought to life at a shipyard. The Polish government went to great lenghts trying to destroy it, however it ended up having about 10 MILLION members by the end of the first year. The graffiti looks similar to this poster: 

But it gets better. High ranking members of the organization are known for praising Thatcher who in return was know to support them. (sources x and x)

A non-governmental organization with lots of members and supporters all over the world? Sherlock spending two years abroad trying (unsuccessfully) to dismantly Moriarty’s network? Finding out A.G.R.A. was in fact an acronym and also the name of a secret organization of assassins? Female members of the British government being known to support a foreign organization, allegedly using them for their benefits?

Tagging some people who I think enjoy a good conspiracy: @vaticancameo1895 @patheticmortal-wtchemicaldefects @teaplosh @221bangable @shelock @1895-doyle-and-bronte-obsessed @shag-me-senseless-watson @currently-in-my-mind-palace @gemini-traveler @teaandforeshadowing @legit-john-watson

5

23/7/2014: Crown Prince Hussein arrives at the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organization (JHCO) and volunteers in an initiative for people in Gaza. JHCO specializes and humanitarian assistance and is the official mandate assigned by the Jordanian Government to work with local communities and extend its efforts to offer regional and international aid.

(Source: JHCO/BridgesPrJo)

NGOs* are cages.

We really need to understand the methods used by NGOs to undermine radical political organizing efforts and divert us into political dead ends. The climate march is a good case study because it’s so blatant.

In South Florida, we saw the exact same process after the BP oil spill. Once the NGOs came in to the organizing meetings and were given the floor, all potential resistance was blocked, strangled, and left for dead. NGOs will descend on any organizing effort and try to take it over, dilute it, and bring it eventually to the Democratic Party. We can also see an identical set-up with the established labor unions and many other organizations.

If organizers are being paid, usually they are trapped in this dynamic, whether or not they want to be. While combining a job with organizing to challenge the system sounds very tempting and full of potential, it’s overwhelmingly not possible. They are two fundamentally incompatible aims, and those funding the job definitely do not have the aim of allowing its employees to undermine the system – the very system that allows the funders to exist, that they feed off of. Capitalists aren’t stupid, and they know how to keep their employees chained to a post, even if the leash feels long. With NGOs, capitalism has set up a great mechanism for itself both to generate revenue, and to pacify people who might otherwise be fighting to break the framework. “The unity of the chicken and the roach happens in the belly of the chicken.”

Another problem is that the rest of us attending an activity or a demonstration have to wonder: when organizers are being paid to say whatever it is they’re saying, how do we know whether or not they believe it? They follow a script, and can’t reveal their true feelings. They attempt to promote their cause in a convincing way, but if their funding was cut off, would they still be involved? Would their orientation still be the same? It’s hard to believe anything said by a paid spokespuppet – it’s like interacting with an embodied list of talking points. There can be no real trust, that the person could be relied upon when the money is no longer there.

Of course people need jobs, and NGOs provide them. I’m not blaming those who work for NGOs any more than who work for any other capitalist institution. We’re all trapped in the enemy’s economy. Instead, what I’m arguing for is to be aware of the nature of it, its severe limitations, and to do real political work outside the framework provided by the job.

We should attend demonstrations like the climate march, because a lot of sincere people will be there who want to make a difference. But we should remain autonomous within them, bringing our own message targeting capitalism as the root of the problem, exposing the uselessness of working within the political frameworks it sets up for us, and building our own organizations with the people we meet.

To challenge, weaken and ultimately destroy capitalism, we need to build a strong, organized, broad, combative mass movement outside the influence of capitalist interests.

* (NGO: Non-Governmental Organizations, or “non-profits,” usually in fact funded by governments and/or corporate foundations).

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess Of Cambridge arrive to meet children from Magic Bus, Childline and Doorstep, three non-governmental organizations, and watch a game of cricket at Mumbai’s iconic recreation ground, the Oval Maidan, during the royal visit to India and Bhutan in Mumbai, India | April 10, 2016