non fictional

in honour of march being #trypod month, here’s everything you need to know about podcasts!

what the heck even are podcasts?

podcasts are audio shows that are either in episode or radio format, which you can download and listen to whenever you like, for free!! there are both fiction and non fictional podcasts, so there is something for everyone

why should i listen to these?

podcasts are similar to audiobooks and radio shows in that you can listen to them anywhere, on your phone or computer, and are ideal for commutes and journeys (i personally listen to most of mine on the bus to and from school). most podcasts are made by people as a hobby rather than their job, so you can support them by listening as well 

where can i find podcasts?

pretty much every podcast ever is available on itunes and spotify, and many apps for non apple devices

cool, can you give me some recommendations?

fiction

welcome to night vale [weird and spooky fantasy] is about a small town in america, where a lot of weird crap goes on, but here in night vale this is generally completely normal. this is pretty much how everyone gets into podcasts, and is a really good starting point for listening to fiction podcasts

the bright sessions [sci-fi] is about some folks with superpower in therapy trying to learn about themselves, their powers and how to control them. honest to god this is my most favourite fiction podcast ever, i love it with all of my heart and cannot recommend this enough. 

the orbiting human circus of the air [fantasy?] is about an old-timey radio show that broadcasts from the top of the eiffel tower. this is honestly such a joy to listen to, and has some wonderful stories with really interesting ways of telling them

wolf 359 [sci-fi and comedy] is about a small crew in a space station, orbiting the red dwarf star, wolf 359. it starts off pretty light hearted and gets pretty wild pretty quickly, so buckle in for a bumpy ride. (they did a live show and recorded it and put it on youtube and it is honestly such a gift seeing zach jump back and forth arguing with himself.)

the penumbra podcast [noir/fantasy/western/horror] is really queer. its great. the main stories follow a non-binary pi named juno steel, but there are other stories on the feed too that are well worth a listen (and season 2 premiers really soon!)

eos 10 [sci-fi and comedy] is about some doctors in space. its hilarious (the main plot arc starts with a boner that just will not go away) and the characters are super interesting. its been on break for a really long time, but is on its way back soon, so keep your eyes peeled!

the strange case of starship iris [sci-fi adventure] is new and really cleverly done. im still blown away by how cool the end credits are, everytime i hear them. its also about gays in space which is cool also ;)

the adventure zone [comedy and adventure] is barely a fiction podcast as it is 3 brothers and their dad playing d&d. if you have never played d&d, or think its boring, then dont let that deter you, because this podcast is the funniest one i have listened to. it starts a little slowly, so be prepared for that, but it really picks up a few episodes in, and griffin’s story telling gets SO good, i really recommend this one as well

non-fiction

spirits is 2 women chatting about really cool myths and legends, both old and new, from all of the world, whilst quite tipsy. this was the first podcast i listened to and i fell in love. i personally recommend the “japanese urban legend” episode its super creepy and super cool

dead pilots society is a table reading of tv pilots that are bought by companies but never made. they so far have all been comedies and include well known writers and actors, and are great for long journeys, as well as one time listening if you don’t want to get too emotionally involved in anything

my brother my brother and me  is a really bad advice show and really good comedy podcast run by 3 brothers (the same ones in the adventure zone minus their dad) who answer questions and give terrible advice that is hilarious to listen to. they also made a tv show on seeso recently, which you can also check out the first episode on yt!

international waters is a quiz show between british and american comedians which is interesting and hilarious, with different contestants each week to keep it fresh and interesting

i have a ton more i could talk about (including my own which premiers on april 1st) but these are some of my highlights. if you want any recommendations, feel free to message me or drop me an ask!

Non-Zootopia Fan fictions I'd like to someday write.

A Trollhunters AU, (haven’t decided what time line) where Barbara and a baby Jim are ‘taken in’ by a pack of changelings to be the property of changeling Strickler. 
A Sleepy Hollow (TV series) reverse AU. Abbie travels back to the colonial times to meet fellow witness Ichabod Crane to stop the apocalypse centuries before it occurs. 
Tons of cute one shots for 2017’s Beauty and the Beast. 

anonymous asked:

non-fiction recs, please?

I don’t read a lot of non-fic (I’m hoping to change that though) but here’s a few that I’ve read and really enjoyed:

Making My Pitch: A Woman’s Baseball Odyssey by Ila Jane Borders

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero

The Funny Thing Is… by Ellen DeGeneres

Wonder Women by Sam Maggs

The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy by Sam Maggs

Seriously… I’m Kidding by Ellen DeGeneres

We Should Hang Out Sometime by Josh Sundquist

Yes Please by Amy Poehler

Being Jazz: My Life as a (Transgender) Teen by Jazz Jennings

9

“Also reading, reading non-fiction… reading fiction kind of amps up my anxiety sometimes.” (SFCon 2016)

Some people ask: ‘Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?’ Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general—but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women.
—  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, We Should All Be Feminists

Women’s Work: The First 20,000 years by Elizabeth Wayland Barber, 1996

This is a great book, all about the work of spinning and weaving, how it developed, and how and why it was women’s work. It makes the great point that women’s work is ephemeral - food, cloth, it’s all things that don’t survive archaeologically, so that it’s something that gets overlooked. The author also knows how to weave herself, and has tried out weaving some ancient cloths, pointing out that it’s only by doing something like that that you can work out practical issues. 

One of the things that was really great was the author pointing out that the most plausible reconstruction for the Venus de Milo is of her spinning:

Even better, is that since the book has been written, an artist who makes 3D printed sculpture has made a 3D model of what she would have looked like - and you can buy one for yourself:

Cultivate an understanding that life is long, that people both change and remain the same, that every last one of us will need to fuck up and be forgiven, that we’re all just walking and walking and walking and trying to find our way, that all roads lead eventually to the mountaintop.
—  Cheryl Strayed, Brave Enough
I think that the power of art is the power to wake us up, strike us to our depths, change us. What are we searching for when we read a novel, see a film, listen to a piece of music? We are searching, through a work of art, for something that alters us, that we weren’t aware of before.
—  Jhumpa Lahiri, “The Metamorphosis,” In Other Words.

“When I was a child, when I was an adolescent, books saved me from despair: that convinced me that culture was the highest of values.”

—Simone de Beauvoir, The Woman Destroyed

npr.org
The Term 'Graphic Novel' Has Had A Good Run. We Don't Need It Anymore.
Coined in an era when comics were considered 'junk' culture, graphic novel is a hoary, meaningless, and often completely inaccurate term. Comics are comics; stop apologizing for them.

Hey Glen, did you hear? Last night, March: Book Three by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell — the final book in their graphic novel trilogy about young Lewis’ experiences in the civil rights movement — won the National Book Award for young people’s literature!

I heard! It’s fantastic! Both the fact that it won, and the comic itself, which is a deeply moving, eye-level, feet-on-the-ground account of the era that shows just how much hard, punishing work it took to change America. Lewis and co-writer Aydin take time to dig into the kind of small, human moments of pain, anguish, doubt and fear that history books tend to breeze past. And Artist Nate Powell makes sure you feel all those emotions — as well as moments of joy and soaring triumph.

It ends up offering far more than a how-to on civil disobedience — ultimately, it’s a why-to: a searingly hopeful testament to the power of protest, and a celebration of the young people who sacrificed their safety to make the country a more just place to live.

Yeah, I figured you’d be happy. I know you’re a graphic novel guy, so.

… It’s not a graphic novel.

What?

That’s the second time you called it a graphic novel. Stop calling it a graphic novel. It’s not a graphic novel. For one thing, it’s non-fiction.

2.1.16 Happy new year!! Feels weird to be in 2016. So this is my desk and my bookshelf! I thought I’d take a shelfie so that at the end of the year I can take another one and see how it’s changed. My reading goal for 2016 is 40 books so I’d better get cracking!
My old work is at the top with design books, the classics and notebooks are below, then cds and harry potter and graphic novels, then fiction at the bottom! 📚📖

To accept one’s past – one’s history – is not the same thing as drowning in it; it is learning how to use it. An invented past can never be used; it cracks and crumbles under the pressures of life like clay in a season of drought.
—  James Baldwin, from “Down at the Cross: Letter from a Region in My Mind,” The Fire Next Time
What does a word mean? And a life? In the end, it seems to me, the same thing. Just as a word can have many dimensions, many nuances, great complexity, so, too, can a person, a life. Language is the mirror, the principal metaphor. Because ultimately the meaning of a word, like that of a person, is boundless, ineffable.
—  Jhumpa Lahiri, “The Fragile Shelter,” In Other Words. 
literature genres

Gryffindor: Anything gripping and Nonsense; at least it shouldn’t get boring. Gryffindors are only enthusiastic about books with a fluent story; otherwise they’d stop reading in the middle of the book. About the half of the Gryffindors actually read a lot of books; the others aren’t really passionate about reading.

Slytherin: Nonsense and Horror. Just like the Gryffindors, they hate stories that flatten down in the middle. Slytherins usually read a lot and share their muggle books (after the war against Voldemort, they got more tolerable with muggles and mudbloods), so they’re all reading the same books and nobody’s alone in their fandom.

Ravenclaw: The most of the Ravenclaws are fond of either dramas and non-fiction or real stories. They don’t really like made-up, surreal stories and fiction, except old tales and myths; they also read and write a lot of poems. Only a few purebloods read muggle books because the Ravenclaws usually like to buy the books themselves.

Hufflepuff: They’re having a soft spot for Comedy and schmaltzy Romance. The Ravenclaws find it pretty tasteless of the Hufflepuffs for liking kitschy books, but they actually just read them for fun. Hufflepuffs never really take novels they read in their spare time serious; that’s why they avoid creepy or serious texts. They basically read for amusement.

the houses as literature genres requested by anon

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