non epsilon

Roosterteehth Top 5 Favorite books

Neil Gaimen and Terry Pratchet. Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies by Agnes Nutter, Witch 

Armageddon is coming, the armies of good and evil are amassing, the four horsemen of the apocalypse have been assembled, Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, and the anti-Christ is about to rise. But an Angel and a Demon, both of whom who have lived on Earth with the mortals since the beginning and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle, are not looking forward to the coming Rapture. The fast-living demon Crowley who is described as, “An Angel who did not so much Fall as Saunter Vaguely Downwards,” and the sweet, bookish, and pretentious angel Aziraphale have developed a grudging fondness for Earth, humans, and even each other over the last couple millennia. After realizing that they have more in common with each other than their remote allies in the distant realms of Heaven and Hell, they form something of a friendship and work together to sabotage the upcoming apocalypse. The novel, which weaves together satire, cynicism, slapstick, and wacky unconventional humor is, to this day, the funniest book that Roosterteehth’s ever read.

Stephen Hunt. The Court of the Air

The streetwise Molly Templar finds herself to be the target of multiple trained mercenaries and must go on the run in order to survive. It seems like the whole world is after her, but she doesn’t know what has marked her as special. Concurrently, Oliver Brooks has led a sheltered existence in the home of his wealthy merchant uncle, but finds himself framed for his only relative’s murder and forced to flee for his life accompanied by an agent of the shadowy Court of the Air. They find themselves entangled in a grave threat to civilization that draws on an ancient power thought to have been quelled millennia ago. While it falls into the steam-punk genre, the world Hunt has created blends the typical steam-powered airships and quasi-Victorian culture with a race of intelligent crustaceans; parliamentarian, royalist, and populist political factions; sentient steam driven robots with their own country and religion, magical weapons, and countless other charms just over-the-top enough to be wildly immersive and enjoyable. The story also makes stunning parallels to our own global current including historical events, politics, societal structures, and ideological references. It is a brilliant mirror of our world mixed with stunning magic and adventure. There were very few, almost no, aspects of the story Roosterteehth did not like. Orphans are always good. So are flying ships. Underground cities. Assassins. Crab people. Mutants. Communism. Robot warriors with souls. The dilution of Good vs. Evil. Unique political systems. Mind control. Exploding tree sap. Dazzlingly fun and a wonderful read.

Aldous Huxley. Brave New World

Brave New World takes placed in an idealized society where everyone is happy, everyone has what they want, and everything is based on logical principals. The fundamental tenets on which this society is built on are a caste system ranging from the esteemed and admired Alphas to the obtuse Epsilons, a non-existent family structure where babies are mass-produced on a literal conveyor belt, an education system where everyone undergoes hypnopaedia (sleep conditioning) that conditions them to fit into the ideals and beliefs of society, the act of predestining your future career before you are born and modifying your environment from pre-birth to make you adept and even enthusiastic for it, and a drug named soma that will make you happy even when all other routes have failed. Everyone is happy, everyone accepts their role in society and the caste system, everyone loves their job, everyone is always comfortable, and no one has any need to question this happiness. The major theme of this book probes the cost of stability and whether it is really worth living a shallow life if it means being free of pain. A classic dystopian novel from the genre that birthed YA dystopias, and an insightful and imaginative take on human nature.

Mark Walden. H.I.V.E. : Higher Institute of Villainous Education 

Roosterteehth read this at a slightly younger age, but still heartily recommends the book nonetheless. H.I.V.E is a top-secret school of villainy, where children with a keen talent for wrongdoing and a cunning disposition are sent to develop their talents into villainous mastermind. The school has four streams depending on the branch of evil best suited to your strengths: the Alpha Stream, Henchmen Stream, Technical Stream, and Political Financial Stream. When Otto Malpanese crafts a clever plan to save his orphanage that just so happens to include tricking the Prime Minister of Britain, he catches the attention of H.I.V.E. and ends up being forcibly enrolled. He and his new friends Wing (a martial arts fighter) Shelby (a jewel thief), and Laura (a technological genius) have been handpicked to enter into the Alpha Stream and take classes such as Tactical Education, Stealth and Evasion, Code Breaking, History of Villainous leaders, and everything else a future super villain would need to know. But within the luxurious campus with its marble rooms, steel doors, and floodlit hangars, Otto realizes that this is a six-year program and leaving is not an option. Problem is, he has no intention of staying. Otto and his friends attempt to do what no H.I.V.E. student has done before – defy the wicked Headmaster Dr. Nero and escape from the only school in the world run by super villains. In Roosterteehth’s opinion, there are far to many books in the world featuring boring, flat antagonists with zero depth or development. What charmed her about H.I.V.E. is how it took a setting entirely consisting of villains and made them relatable and interesting while still including the protagonist/antagonist dynamic. This is not a story of Black vs. White, but rather Black vs. Slightly Darker Shade Of Black, which you may agree is way cooler. If you often relate to antagonists in stories and are looking for a new facet of the supervillain story, H.I.V.E is what you;re looking for. 

Lisa McMann. The Unwanteds

The first book, Roosterteehth’s unchallenged favorite (she didn’t like the rest of the series), takes place on the island of Quill, which is completely isolated from the rest of the world. Citizens aren’t even sure there is anything else out there. The society is built on a social hierarchy of Wanteds, Necessaries, and Unwanteds, and your status is determined at the age of thirteen. Wanteds get more schooling and the chance to join the Quillitary or receive a government position. Necessaries keep the farms and other labor industries running. Unwanteds are sentenced to elimination. In the stark, gritty land of Quill, being creative is a death sentence. Alex is condemned as an Unwanted after being caught drawing in the mud as a child, while his ambitious twin, Aaron, is chosen to be a Wanted. As Alex boards the bus with the rest of the Unwanteds he makes peace with his fate- until he discovers that the lake of boiling oil he had been promised is actually a magical place called Artimé. There, Alex and his new friends are encouraged to cultivate their creative abilities, combine them with magic, and live freely on the colorful school campus. But when Alex attempts to reach Aaron, he exposes a secret that places Artimé and the Unwanteds in mortal jeopardy, and pits brother against brother in an ultimate battle for survival. Again, Roosterteehth read this at a younger age but the concepts laid out in the book still make for an exciting read. The stale society of Quill was juxtaposed against a magical world of creativity and art, and she found herself adoring this sector of the story independently from the overall narrative. Additionally, it placed two twins against each other in a much larger context of warring societal ideals. Worth based on societal contribution vs. freedom to invent and create is vital to a society’s success. Control vs. Creativity, but not necessarily Good vs. Evil. This book is a fast-paced, action-packed story of colorful magic and dark mental/emotional manipulation.

thought to have been quelled millennia ago. While it falls into the steam-punk genre, the world Hunt has created blends the typical steam-powered airships and quasi-Victorian culture with a race of intelligent crustaceans; parliamentarian, royalist, and populist political factions; sentient steam driven robots with their own country and religion, magical weapons, and countless other charms just over-the-top enough to be wildly immersive and enjoyable. The story also makes stunning parallels to our own global current including historical events, politics, societal structures, and ideological references. It is a brilliant mirror of our world mixed with stunning magic and adventure. There were very few, almost no, aspects of the story Roosterteehth did not like. Orphans are always good. So are flying ships. Underground cities. Assassins. Crab people. Mutants. Communism. Robot warriors with souls. The dilution of Good vs. Evil. Unique political systems. Mind control. Exploding tree sap. Dazzlingly fun and a great read.

anonymous asked:

ok but rvb/homestuck headcanon where north and york are moirails and york is the oblivious mofo all "yes man so pale for you such pale much paleness" while north vacillates into the red SO HARD and refuses to say anything about it and just sits there petting york's hair all "this is fine this is fine this is fine"

fuck fucK FUCK FUCK!!!

edit: i just realized york and wyoming are kismeses i want to leave i want to burn my inbox