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Photomicrography Competition | Nikon’s Small World

Concurso de Fotografía Microscopica de Nikon

“Nikon’s Small World is regarded as the leading forum for showcasing the beauty and complexity of life as seen through the light microscope. (…) The video competition, entitled Small World In Motion encompasses any movie or digital time-lapse photography taken through the microscope.” 

Annual Winners http://www.nikonsmallworld.com/galleries/photo


1975 

1ST PLACE
1975 PHOTOMICROGRAPHY COMPETITION
James Dvorak
USA

Subject Matter:
Oxalic acid crystals during Precipitation (100x)
Technique:
Transmitted Polarized Light with a Berek Quartz Wedge

1976

Eric V. Gravé
New York, USA

Subject Matter:
Encysted Parasitic round worm (trichinella spirals) (50x)
Technique:
Differential Interference Contrast

1977
James W. Smith
Independence, Ohio, USA

Subject Matter:
Crystals of rutile (titanium dioxide) and tridymite (a polymorph of quartz) in a cobalt-rich glass (350x)
Technique:
Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast
See also: Mineral

1978

David Gnizak
Independence, Ohio, USA

Subject Matter:
Gold, vaporized in a tungsten boat, in a vacuum evaporator (55x)
Technique:
Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast

1979

David Gnizak
Independence, Ohio, USA

Subject Matter:
Gold, vaporized in a tungsten boat, in a vacuum evaporator (55x)
Technique:
Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast

1980

James M. King
UC Santa Barbara
Marine Science Institute
Santa Barbara, California, USA

Subject Matter:
Larvacean within its feeding structure dyed with red organic carmine which the larvacean syphoned in while filter feeding (20x)
Technique:
Underwater camera with multiple extension tubes

1981

James M. King
UC Santa Barbara
Marine Science Institute
Santa Barbara, California, USA

Subject Matter:
Larvacean within its feeding structure dyed with red organic carmine which the larvacean syphoned in while filter feeding (20x)
Technique:
Underwater camera with multiple extension tubes

1982

James M. King
UC Santa Barbara
Marine Science Institute
Santa Barbara, California, USA

Subject Matter:
Larvacean within its feeding structure dyed with red organic carmine which the larvacean syphoned in while filter feeding (20x)
Technique:
Underwater camera with multiple extension tubes

1983

Elieen Roux
Bob Hope International Heart Research Institute
Seattle, Washington, USA

Subject Matter:
Suctorian attached to stalk of red algae, encircled by ring of diatoms (125x)
Technique:
Darkfield

1984

Elieen Roux
Bob Hope International Heart Research Institute
Seattle, Washington, USA

Subject Matter:
Suctorian attached to stalk of red algae, encircled by ring of diatoms (125x)
Technique:
Darkfield

1985

Elieen Roux
Bob Hope International Heart Research Institute
Seattle, Washington, USA

Subject Matter:
Suctorian attached to stalk of red algae, encircled by ring of diatoms (125x)
Technique:
Darkfield



1986

Dr. Stephen Lowry
University of Ulster
Department of Biology
Coleraine, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Subject Matter:
Live water mount of Hydra viridissima capturing Daphnia pulex (10x)
Technique:
Darkfield

1987

Julie Macklin & Dr. Graeme Laver
Australian National University
Canberra, Australia

Subject Matter:
Crystals of influenza virus neuraminidase isolated from terns (14x)
Technique:
Brightfield with Colored Filters

1988

David A. Smith
Victoria Point, Queensland, Australia

Subject Matter:
Gold residue and gold-coated bubbles in glassy matrix (20x)
Technique:
Brightfield

1989

David A. Smith
Victoria Point, Queensland, Australia

Subject Matter:
Gold residue and gold-coated bubbles in glassy matrix (20x)
Technique:
Brightfield

1990

Richard H. Lee
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Illinois, USA

Subject Matter:
Crystals evaporated from solution of magnesium sulfate and tartaric acid (50x)
Technique:
Polarized Light

1991

Marc van Hove
Centexbel
Merelbeke, Belgium

Subject Matter:
Polyurethane elastic fiber bundle (25x)
Technique:
Polarized Light

1992

Lars Bech
Deurne, The Netherlands

Subject Matter:
10-year old preparation of barbital, fenacetine, valium and acetic acid (35x)
Technique:
Polarized Light

1993

Ron Sturm
Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc.
Skokie, Illinois, USA

Subject Matter:
Fossil Fusulinids in limestone (8x)
Technique:
Polarized Light

1994

Jean Rüegger-Deschenaux
Mikroskopische Gesellschaft
Zurich, Switzerland

Subject Matter:
Cross-section of very young beech (40x)
Technique:
Brightfield

1995

Christian Gautier
JACANA Press Agency
Vanves, France

Subject Matter:
Larva of Pleuronectidae (20x)
Technique:
Rheinberg Illumination and Polarized Light

1996

Christian Gautier
JACANA Press Agency
Vanves, France

Subject Matter:
Larva of Pleuronectidae (20x)
Technique:
Rheinberg Illumination and Polarized Light

1997

Barbara Danowski
Union College
Schenectady, New York, USA

Subject Matter:
Mouse fibroblasts (160x)
Technique:
Fluorescence

1998 

Barbara Danowski
Union College
Schenectady, New York, USA

Subject Matter:
Mouse fibroblasts (160x)
Technique:
Fluorescence

1999

Barbara Danowski
Union College
Schenectady, New York, USA

Subject Matter:
Mouse fibroblasts (160x)
Technique:
Fluorescence

2000

Daphne Zbaeren-Colbourn
Bern, Switzerland

Subject Matter:
Avicennia marina (mangrove) leaf (40x)
Technique:
Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast

2001

Harold Taylor
Kensworth, United Kingdom

Subject Matter:
Fresh water rotifer feeding among debris (200x)
Technique:
Darkfield

2002

Thomas J. Deerinck
University of California, San Diego
National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research
La Jolla, California, USA

Subject Matter:
Sagittal section of rat cerebellum (40x)
Technique:
Fluorescence and Confocal

2003

Thomas J. Deerinck
University of California, San Diego
National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research
La Jolla, California, USA

Subject Matter:
Sagittal section of rat cerebellum (40x)
Technique:
Fluorescence and Confocal

2004

Seth A. Coe-Sullivan
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

Subject Matter:
Quantum dot nanocrystals deposited on a silicon substrate (200x)
Technique:
Polarized Reflected Light

2005

Charles B. Krebs
Charles Krebs Photography
Issaquah, Washington, USA

Subject Matter:
Muscoid fly (house fly) (6.25x)
Technique:
Reflected Light

2006

Dr. Paul Appleton
University of Dundee
Division of Cell and Developmental Biology
Dundee, Scotland, United Kingdom

Subject Matter:
Cell nuclei of the mouse colon (740x)
Technique:
2-Photon fluorescence

2007

Gloria Kwon
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Institute
New York City, New York, USA

Subject Matter:
Double transgenic mouse embryo, 18.5 days (17x)
Technique:
Brightfield, Darkfield, Fluorescence (GFP and RFP)

2008

Gloria Kwon
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Institute
New York City, New York, USA

Subject Matter:
Double transgenic mouse embryo, 18.5 days (17x)
Technique:
Brightfield, Darkfield, Fluorescence (GFP and RFP)

2009

Dr. Heiti Paves
Tallinn University of Technology
Tallinn, Estonia

Subject Matter:
Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) anther (20x)
Technique:
Confocal

2010

Jonas King
Vanderbilt University
Department of Biological Sciences
Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Subject Matter:
Anopheles gambiae (mosquito) heart (100x)
Technique:
Fluorescence

2011

Dr. Igor Siwanowicz
Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology
Martinsried, Germany

Subject Matter:
Portrait of a Chrysopa sp. (green lacewing) larva (20x)
Technique:
Confocal
In this stunning winning image, confocal microscopy offers an intimate perspective on the invertebrate’s inner architecture, including horn-like mandibles, powerful muscles, simple eyes and a small central nervous system. A collection of multiple images stitched together allows a large area to be visualized in great detail. While the image is aesthetically interesting, it also provides insight into the complex, intricate muscles required for the seemingly simple task of operating the insect’s mouth; thus demonstrating the power and applicability of confocal microscopy to invertebrate morphology studies.

2012

Dr. Jennifer L. Peters & Dr. Michael R. Taylor
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Subject Matter:
The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo (20x)
Technique:
Confocal

2013

Wim van Egmond
Micropolitan Museum
Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Subject Matter:
Chaetoceros debilis (marine diatom), a colonial plankton organism (250x)
Technique:
Differential Interference Contrast, Image Stacking
Wim van Egmond compared Nikon’s Small World competition to “a colorful stained-glass window that opens into a wonderful, unknown world.” His first-place winning image of Chaetoceros debilis, a colonial diatom, certainly represents that ideal while also finding the perfect convergence of science and art. Not only are diatoms one of the most important oxygen producers on earth, they are also a vital link in the food chain. The particular species documented in van Egmond’s winning photomicrograph was captured from marine plankton in the North Sea, and he wanted to show it in its full splendor. In order to showcase the various dimensions of the organism, van Egmond employed an image stacking technique. Combining many images, van Egmond used differential interference contrast, to obtain a dark blue background that provides a stunning contrast with the yellow and brown shades of the diatom. It’s a complicated technique, that when combined with van Egmond’s artistic eye, made him the clear winner of the 2013 competition. A freelance photographer who has held an interest in natural history since childhood, van Egmond has been practicing photomicrography for nearly two decades. While he enjoys studying and photographing of all types of microorganisms under the microscope, van Egmond believes that aquatic organisms in particular provide “a rich and inspiring source for photomicrography.”

2014

Rogelio Moreno Gill
Panama, Panama

Subject Matter:
Rotifer showing the mouth interior and heart shaped corona (40x)
Technique:
Differential Interference Contrast

2015

Ralph Claus Grimm
Jimboomba, Queensland, Australia

Subject Matter:
Eye of a honey bee (Apis mellifera) covered in dandelion pollen (120x)
Technique:
Reflected Light
Ralph Grimm brings the world eye-to-eye with a honey bee in this year’s powerful winning image, which features a close-up look at a bee eye covered in dandelion pollen grains. Magnified at 120x, the image is not only visually striking, but brings to light just how little is understood about how these incredible insects see the world through complex eyes.

Grimm employed impressive technique to capture this image stack, including over four hours of careful work to mount the eye, set the focus increments, properly illuminate the eye and avoid peripheral smudging during the stacking process. The resulting image is a testament to Grimm’s painstaking efforts.

As a high school teacher, self-taught photomicrographer and former beekeeper, the subject matter is near and dear to Grimm’s heart. While colonies continue to dwindle and bee populations disappear, Grimm hopes his image can serve as a voice for this endangered species that plays such a critical function in pollinating the world’s crops.

“In a way I feel as though this gives us a glimpse of the world through the eye of a bee,” says Grimm. “It’s a subject of great sculptural beauty, but also a warning- that we should stay connected to our planet, listen to the little creatures like bees, and find a way to protect the earth that we all call home.”